Head-Fi.org › HeretixAevum › Reviews by HeretixAevum

Reviews by: HeretixAevum

I can see why it's considered a classic, but not quite what I'm after

Posted

Pros: Quality Bass, Neutral mids, Articulate and extended treble, Solid build quality, All day comfort, Serviceable, Fairly priced

Cons: Bass and treble quantities not optimal, Lack of warmth / Analytical, Earpad wearing, Headband adjustment very prone to wearing out

Sound Quality There are a few negative conceptions floating around about the DT880s and their sound signature. The most common is that it’s an analytical headphone, which was the most interesting aspect for me as I’d never heard a headphone that had earned that moniker before. Generally this is said to mean that the headphone does not have a ‘musical’ tone and that it sounds cold, clinical and dry.  Other items of discussion about the DT880 is that they are too bright, recessed in the mids, and weak (and even muddy!) in the bass. Here is what I found:   Bass is the thing I think is most disagreed upon with headphones, since it seems to be what  most people out there...
(read more)

Unfortunately a bit lacking where it matters most...

Posted

Pros: Great looks, Solid build, Nice accessories, Folding design, Pleasurable lower midrange, Textured bass, Great isolation

Cons: Sluggish bass, Glazed over upper midrange, Under-represented treble, Crappy noise cancelling mode, Poor comfort, Non-replaceable earpads

Revenge Of The Ner- err, Audiophiles...   If I were to sum up what types of headphone demographics there are, in an overly simplified way, it would be that there is the average consumers and the audiophiles & professionals. Saying "Consumer headphone" around head-fi has become synonymous with things like Beats By Dre, headphones known for putting image and marketing before audio performance. This is because the audience these headphones are appealing to are not going to be particularly difficult to please in the performance department. As long as the bass is significantly boosted, and the level of clarity is a coat of paint above pure mud; they'll be happy....
(read more)

Better than it's predecessor and priced accordingly

Posted

Pros: Sounds fantastic, Very comfortable, Sturdy build quality, Attractive aesthetic design, Super portable, Serviceable

Cons: Doesn't isolate, A hair less comfortable than before

This will be a very brief comparison review with the PX100, my review of which can be found here: http://www.head-fi.org/products/sennheiser-px-100-collapsible-headphones/reviews/8181 Aesthetics   This is the most striking difference between the PX100 and PX100ii, with the latter being the far better off. The PX100 has aged noticeably, and the updated version really does look far nicer. Sennheiser have updated the aesthetics of a classic without resorting to gaudy, flashy design choices. The PX100ii is sleek, modern, dark and stylish. I think it's a really great looking headphone. I especially like the little Sennheiser logo on the arms, as well as the new cup design....
(read more)

Had to grow on me a little, but actually damn good headphones for under $100!

Posted

Pros: Genuinely impressive sound quality for under $100, Cozy comfy, Lightweight & secure fit, Nice looks, Includes accessories

Cons: Earpads would benefit from being more spacious, Build quality could be improved, Isolation is similar to Denon D2000

  A legendary value performer   The Creative Aurvana Live! (CAL! for short) has a strong reputation for being an excellent choice for beginning headphone hobbyists and an amazingly good sounding headphone for under $100. I found myself with some spare cash, and was after some new headphones after selling my Denon D2000, and thought it would be fun to try the CALs, since they are a reincarnation of the Denon D1000. People have described them as a little brother of the D2000, and I think they are to some extent. Certainly for the better in the sound department, for the worse in other areas. So, I bought a pair directly from Creative, and 4 days later they arrived...
(read more)

Well built, great looking and excellent sounding headphone hindered by comfort and ergonomic issues

Posted

Pros: Sound quality, good isolation, great modern looks, sturdy build quality, good value performance

Cons: Ergonomic niggles, uncomfortable for me

Onkyo's entry into the headphone game   After selling my V-Moda M80s due to discomfort and trading my Shure se215s due to finding ergonomic issues with IEMs in general, my search for a portable headphone continued. As a subscriber to Innerfidelity, I opened youtube one day to see Tyll's new review of the ES-FC300 and ES-HF300 headphones from Onkyo. Portables! I knew Tyll typically only reviews things he likes, so I gave it a watch. He sure seemed impressed with them! And they looked like they were much closer to circumaural headphones, maybe they'd be much more comfortable for me than the past on ears I've tried? I bought the HF version that day and waited for delivery. Here is...
(read more)

The best sealed headphones I've heard for sure, but ergonomically lacking

Posted

Pros: Fantastic sound, Mature aesthetic design, Versatile, Solid build quality, Ideal compromise between open and sealed traits, Modding potential

Cons: Uncomfortable and slightly unwieldy feeling, Isolation is lacking for sealed headphone, Discontinued / Price gauging, Requires care to avoid damage

A sadly rare classic   The Denon D2/5/7000 line of headphones are quite legendary. Many considering them to be some of, if not the, best full sized sealed headphones to be produced. Their discontinuing was, understandably, much mourned with many feeling that there were few truly great sealed headphone options available. I was quite happy with my HFI-2400, but was after the next level in my desktop headphones. I was lucky enough to stumble across some D2000s in the trade forum for $300, and in good as new condition (and in my own country!). I grabbed them and eagerly awaited my arrival of this well renowned headgear.   Hands on Right off the bat, it's quite clear that...
(read more)

My first IEMs, and I'm quite impressed

Posted

Pros: Basshead sound that's actually articulate!, Well built, Secure fit, Awesome colour, Removable cable, Great isolation, Accessories

Cons: Tips are annoying to fit and remove, Fit is finicky until you get used to it

As an upgrade to my portable setup, I decided that I would buy my first pair of proper IEMs. My only prior experience with IEMs were with freebies that came with phones and the like, which were needless to say, awful. I honestly wasn't quite shure (Sorry about that, had to get the obligatory Shure pun out the way) what to expect in terms of performance level, but I was very pleased indeed!   The SE215 Special Editions come well accessorised. Included is a small zip-up carry pouch with room for the IEMS and spare ear tips to fit nice and snug. 6 pairs of tips are included, 3 foam (the famous shure 'olive' tips) and 3 silicone in S, M and L sizes, as well as a wax...
(read more)

A pleasurable sounding, solidly built, comfortable, versatile headphone under $200... Can you say "bargain"?

Posted

Pros: Great comfort, solid build, removable cable, genre versatility, rich, lush & full sound, kickass imaging, natural soundstage, scales with amping, FUN!

Cons: Stock cables, rollercoaster treble, fragile paint job, overpriced at RRP but a great deal heavily discounted or used

After my disappointing experience with the HFI-580 that left me thinking I would never, ever buy another Ultrasone headphone ever again, I continued on my search for a similarly "full" sounding headphone. I really liked the way the HFI-580 did bass, and it's mids were fine (not amazing, but fine). But the incredibly fatiguing treble response and the bad comfort made it simply unacceptable overall. One day I was perusing some frequency response charts, and came across the HFI-2400s. I was actually quite intrigued by what I saw, and a little bit excited, thinking that I may have found what I was after. It had the moderate midbass emphasis of the 580, but with even more in the upper bass,...
(read more)

A godly headphone with so much going for it, and mostly deserved hype... But unfortunately...

Posted

Pros: Sound quality, build quality,aesthetics, service / warranty, packaging, accessories, features, value, it's actually portable!

Cons: Deal-breakingly bad comfort, incompatible cables, wind & cable noise

After become reacquainted with portable audio with the PX100, I decided that I wanted to invest more in my portable headphones in order to bridge the gap between my pleasurable, but humble, portable rig and my much more capable full sized desktop rig. The V-moda M80 looked like a pretty prime candidate, generating quite a bit of hype on Head-fi, and having a glowing recommendation from the well respected Tyl Hertsens of Innerfidelity. I happened to be browsing on Amazon, and they were priced down to $148, so I decided to pounce. 2 weeks later, my headphones arrived and here is what I found; Normally, I wouldn't mention or even think about the packaging of a headphone. Packaging really...
(read more)

Respectable for the price, but too flawed to recommend.

Posted

Pros: Looks, High Quality Mids, Non-Fatiguing, Comfort, Efficient

Cons: "Portable", Bass Quality, Bass Quantity, Hollow Headband, Non-removeable pads

  The HD448 were my first headphones that I could call my own, and my first foray into high quality sound. I bought these in late 2010 for use with my iPod Classic. Like most people entering the headphone game, I was after "more bass, please"  (keep in mind that I was coming from the PX100, which little did I know at the time, was actually somewhat bassy). I was also after headphones that were portable, seeing as I wanted to use them primarily with my iPod.   When they arrived, I opened them up, plonked them on my head, and gave them a whirl. To my immediate disappointment, I discovered that they were less bassy than the PX100! (and as we all know, bass quantity = sound...
(read more)
Head-Fi.org › HeretixAevum › Reviews by HeretixAevum