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Reviews by: Argyris

A criminally overlooked option for semi-portable, closed back neutrality

Posted

Pros: Neutral balance, detailed, nice texture overall, nice tight, punchy bass, well extended treble for a closed set, good imaging, commendably transparent

Cons: Uncomfortable without slight modification, underwhelming bass extension, can seem somewhat bright, only average soundstage, isolation not stellar

Introduction   Like my DT880, and for almost as long, the SRH440 has been a trusty companion, in its case pulling double duty as my portable headphone and as my "plug-it-in-real-quick" set. Therefore it's only fair it gets a proper review as well.   Back in 2009, Shure released a new line of closed-back, full-sized headphones, which included the SRH240, SRH440, and SRH840. The latter two received a lot of interest, though the flagship (at the time) got the lion's share of that. Essentially, Shure had managed to achieve the impossible, which was to make a closed back headphone that actually sounded good and whose name didn't contain the letter M or the number 5. And...
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Smooth, sweet, and soft-spoken: an armature for the midrange lover

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Pros: Lovely, lush midrange, quite comfortable, solid build, excellent accessory kit

Cons: Treble quite subdued, midrange tends to dominate signature, timbre not quite natural, difficult (for me) to get a proper fit

Note: this is more of an impression-style review, since I ultimately did not keep this set. I listened to it intensively, however, and feel confident enough to put together a few thoughts. At the end I mention some things I'd like to see from MEElec's next flagship.   Introduction   The A161P by MEElectronics (hereafter referred to as MEElec) is the company's second single balanced armature-based IEM and the first to include a microphone for use as a smartphone/PC headset. The previous model, the A151, used the Knowles SR (Siren) series armature, whereas the A161 uses the ED series armature. MEElec mentioned on Facebook that they felt that the ED armature would produce...
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Tight fit, loose bass, and cracked plastic: Bustin' a groove or just busting?

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Pros: Non-fatiguing, stylish (if you like the look), comfortable headband

Cons: Loose bass (initially), laid back, grainy treble; forward, shouty mids, durability, comfort

Introduction   This isn't going to be my usual sort of review because just the existence of a write-up for the V700 on my usual scale is somewhat tongue-in-cheek, given the reputation these have. However, I did own not one but two pairs of them before I discovered proper hi-fi, and you could say that I technically still have two pairs of them. We'll get to that in a moment, but as a general statement the V700DJ isn't counted among the great triumphs of hi-fi. However, it was a very successful DJ headphone, and in that context its sonic signature makes some sense. I'm not exactly sure when it was first offered, but I know that in early 2012 it was discontinued. Perhaps its...
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A neutral, airy, comfortable all-rounder

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Pros: Neutral, balanced, detailed, airy, comfortable, well-built

Cons: Some might find the treble too peaky or the bass not present enough

Introduction   I've had my DT880 for over two years now, and I figured it's finally time to give it a proper write-up. Of course the DT880 is nothing new. It was introduced into Beyer's Premium lineup in 2003 and got an aesthetic makeover, along with the entire Premium lineup, in 2005. This is the version I have (the 250 ohm variant). It competed with the HD6x0, and later the K70x, as one of the three top dynamic headphones in the world. The DT880 was the bright, airy one out of the bunch. Lots of headphones have come and gone since then, and Beyer itself has released a new (much more expensive) flagship, the T1. What kind of value does the DT880 offer today? Let's find out. ...
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