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Reviews by: Ishcabible

A good IEM with Bluetooth rather than a Bluetooth IEM

Posted

Pros: Comfortable, exciting sound

Cons: Thin mids, bass may be too strong, Bluetooth has some issues, but they will be fixed come launch

My full review is here: http://www.verumsonus.com/nowall-ch-1-vs-jaybird-x2-mini-review/ but I'll write a small snippet about the CH-1.   The CH-1 stands out in the market because they are a hybrid design with one balanced armature and a 10mm dynamic driver, so they really are an IEM that happens to have Bluetooth. They have a strong V-shaped sound with bright treble, emphasized bass, and thin midrange. But they have surprisingly decent technicalities compared to the Jaybird X2, which costs $50 more than the CH-1. While they do have a sound that may be hit or miss, the CH-1 is a step in the right direction in merging Bluetooth with good sound.

One of the top closed contenders under $500

Posted

Pros: Mids, bass ports allow for customization, wood options are pretty

Cons: Bass isn't the deepest or cleanest, kind of heavy, needs an amp, not the best at detail retrieval

The Fostex x Massdrop TH-X00 opened a door to the idea that spending $400 on a headphone, more than the $200-$300 “mid-fi trio” but less than $1,000+ “summit-fi” range, may legitimately be worth it rather than just an exercise in impatience between buying a mid-fi headphone and what one could consider their endgame headphone. But the TH-X00 is a polarizing headphone—not everyone can tolerate its bass heavy, mid-recessed, treble-happy sound. The Alpha Dog, released in 2013 for $599, occupied the price range before the X00, but its sharp treble and hollow midrange had the potential to also turn off listeners. The ZMF x Vibro, also released in 2014 presented itself as a fun-sounding foil to...
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Easy to drive, but doesn't measure up to others in its price range

Posted

Pros: Drivable out of a phone, decent sound stage, some may enjoy its frequency response

Cons: Midrange was weak, bass was muddy, treble was harsh

TL;DR: The X2 is a good V-shaped headphone. It’s not very good if you are looking for something neutral. This review was hard to write impartially because I don’t like V-shaped sound—I like an n-shaped sound, which emphasizes midrange. At around $200, I can’t really think of another headphone that outright beats it. At the current sub-$200 prices on Amazon Warehouse Deals, they’re a very good deal. They’re a relatively inoffensive-sounding headphone unless you’re especially sensitive to treble. I’d imagine they’re fantastic as gaming headphones if your situation allows for open headphones. But I’ve since sold them because to me, the HD600 is a step up to my preferences. Honestly, if it...
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A Fantastic Entry Into the IEM Scene

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Pros: Customizable sound, great bass timbre with the bassy filter, great value

Cons: Treble-heavy filter can be a bit too bright

RockJaw is an up and coming headphone company from Great Britain starting strong with a huge lineup. The Alfa Genus is one of their midrange offerings and offers a certain special something that is rarely seen in the IEM world other than a few OEM’s. …yeah so this is really late. Sorry to RockJaw for the delays! I’ve been busy with work and other projects (like a collab for a wooden T50RP mod [not ZMF] and trying to make a measurement system) and have another five or so reviews to write up which hasn’t given me much free time for these things.   Anyway, the Alfa Genus came in this really nice packaging, but I’m not sure whether or not it will be part of the retail packaging so I’ll...
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Great for bassheads or just relaxing

Posted

Pros: Smooth, usually unobjectable sound, great build

Cons: Timbre is kind of weird, some may want more midrange, don't love the cable

Late last year, Brainwavz released a number of great IEM’s in the R3, Delta, and S1. The S1 seems to be Brainwavz’s attempt at making a sporty IEM, and pits it to compete against the very competitive $60 bracket. As with the Delta, I reviewed these last year, but since I can’t find it, I’m guessing I never uploaded it before my computer crashed, so this is another short rewritten review. The packaging is a big step up from the Delta’s. The Brainwavz S1 comes with a plethora of accessories. Not only do they come with a nice ballistic nylon case, they come with five different kinds of tips. What’s interesting is that there are two different kinds of single flange tips. There is a grey one...
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Brainwavz Delta--My choice for beater workout IEMs

Posted

Pros: Great fit, decent mids, very durable

Cons: Bass could be more refined, treble peak gets annoying, no case--for $20 I don't expect too much

While the high end IEM market has more options than ever, the sub $20 market is largely full of mediocre products, save for a few gems like the Xiaomi Pistons and LG Quadbeats. Last year, before the Xiaomi fever, Brainwavz released their own contenders: the Deltas. I reviewed these a while ago, but I guess I never uploaded the review before my computer decided to crash, so this is my short rewritten review.   The packaging is basic, coming in a plastic box most sub-$20 big box IEMs come in, but don’t let that discourage their quality. Sadly, the Deltas don’t come with a case (not too surprising, but I wish they did), but they do come with three pairs of silicone tips and a pair of...
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The best IEM of its type under $50, but with a few issues

Posted

Pros: Good build, decent sound quality for the price, the best customizable IEM in its price range

Cons: Not very natural

Narmoo is yet another new contender in the crowded budget IEM world. To stand out in such a competitive field, one either has to get creative. What Narmoo has brought us is an improvement on a old, but interesting system.   The packaging of the Narmoo R1M is a great exercise in moderating excess. Instead of forcing the consumer to pay for fancy packaging, Narmoo has instead provided an excellent carrying case and added a cardboard slip over it to serve as packaging. Inside are some basic tips (I don't really like them; read more to see what I actually use with them) and the different filters (black is bassy, silver is heavily damped, and grey is in between). I did have a bit of a...
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DUNU Tai-Chi--A Balanced Act

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Pros: Very agreeable sound, great build

Cons: Treble issues, midrange could be better

  DUNU has been one of the IEM world’s rising stars as of late. In just two years, DUNU has released a lineup of great IEMs, ranging from the entry level Trident (my favorite budget IEM), to the mid-level Tai-Chi. In fact, the Tai-Chi is what’s to be reviewed today. The Tai-Chi’s packaging is similar to other IEMs in DUNU’s range. It’s a simple two-part packaging, with a sleeve covering a box with a magnetic flap, which opens to reveal the Tai-Chi’s in their full glory. Inside, there are a great number of accessories, including two (!) cases, an airplane adapter, a 6.3mm adapter, and a mysterious box. Inside this magical box are six pairs of tips, a microfiber cloth, an...
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Sennheiser CX985--Mid-Fi Done Right

Posted

Pros: Warm midrange, spacious, unoffensive sound sig

Cons: Treble can get harsh, a little bit of bass bleed, cable is a bit thin

  Sennheiser is the first “legit” headphone company most people hear of and are generally praised unabashedly by people that lack experience. Well at least that’s what I’ve gotten from in my years in the internet. I’d never been the biggest fan of Sennheiser, mostly because I’d never tried anything in their line above the HD25. Everything under the HD25, to me, performed a bit lackadaisical at retail price, so I thought these hardcore supporters were just uninformed. I was hoping the CX985 would cause a change of heart for my opinion of Sennheiser. Well to put to it simply, the HD600 is next on my ever-changing to-buy list.   The CX985’s packaging is quite nice, not only...
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Warm Armatures? You Don't Say...

Posted
  I have a proposition for you. I’ll tell you all about the first balanced armature MEElectronics has made if you agree to think about buying them. Deal? Deal.   The A151 is MEElectronics’ first balanced armature IEM, and I must say, it’s a valiant first try indeed in a market saturated with <$100 IEM’s, and we all know MEE’s specialty is dynamic IEM’s right? So are these A151’s subpar? Far from it! Read on! Packaging: The packaging of the SP51 is noticeably more upscale-looking than the previous line’s plastic box. Instead of the clear plastic boxes of yore, the current box is a dark and mysterious paper box with a mirrored inside. Inside, there is a “safety and...
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Head-Fi.org › Ishcabible › Reviews by Ishcabible