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Mul-T-Lock vs. Medeco

post #1 of 55
Thread Starter 
I'm looking into either getting the cylinder replaced, or the whole d@mn door.

Seems that almost no one has a 5" Backset. Argh! I HATE QUIK SET LOCKS!

Anyways, I'm wondering how Mul-T-Lock Hercular Deadbolt compares to Medeco Deadbolts.
http://www.mul-t-lock.com/

http://www.medeco.com/

I like the Mul-T-Lock keys better. No jagged edges and the key works in either orientation.

-Ed
post #2 of 55
They're both really good locks. Highly recommended.

Qwikset is good... for showing elementary school kids how to pick locks.

(no really! That's how I learned!)
post #3 of 55
Thread Starter 
I just can't stand the fact that every Quikset lock I've used wears out, and it becomes difficult to actually insert the key. Argh.

The door I have has a lock with a 5" backset. Can I just remove the deadbolt lock cylinder and replace it with the Mul-T-Set or Medeco? I know the deadbolt itself will be the weaker Quickset, but I don't have a steel reinforced door frame, so It really won't make a difference.

-Ed
post #4 of 55
You'll have to ask a locksmith for that, I'm afraid...
post #5 of 55
Geez...
before i actually read what it was all about, on my mind, i thought Mul-T-Lock versus Medeco is some sort of Godzilla Versus Mothzilla movie thread...
post #6 of 55
Not quite...

Mul-T-Locks are rather interesting. A friend of mine took some excellent pictures of the vital bits: http://www.crypto.com/photos/misc/mul-t-lock/
post #7 of 55
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by eric343
Not quite...

Mul-T-Locks are rather interesting. A friend of mine took some excellent pictures of the vital bits: http://www.crypto.com/photos/misc/mul-t-lock/
Heheh, funny thing, is that was the last page I looked at before posting this thread here.

-Ed
post #8 of 55
Having spent a lot of time hanging out at a hardware store and then hanging out later with a SF guy who has a store front locksmith store.
I would get the medeco. Both guys state in their opinion the multi locks can be picked with a screwdriver. Do you have any Medeco's?
I switched out the cylinder from my segal lock with a medeco cylinder and it was easy.
post #9 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlindTiger
Having spent a lot of time hanging out at a hardware store and then hanging out later with a SF guy who has a store front locksmith store.
I would get the medeco. Both guys state in their opinion the multi locks can be picked with a screwdriver.
Not the one in the pictures I linked to... maybe a really big screwdriver attached to a hydraulic cylinder capable of physically shearing off the locking components, but there's no way you'll pick that lock just with a screwdriver.
post #10 of 55
Thread Starter 
Any way I could modify Mul-T-Lock or Medeco to have a 5" Backset? THey're all too short. Or more correctly, the moron that used to live here put a knob and lock with a 5" back set.

Would it be possible for me to swap out the cylinder from the QuikSet deadbolt? I really don't want to have to replace the entire door.

Of course that would be like putting a Laddered Attenuator on a Cmoy.

-Ed
post #11 of 55
Thread Starter 
Ah, what the hell.

I placed an order for the Mul-T-Lock Hercular Deadbolt.

I'm hoping to be able to retrofit it, but if I have to replace the door, I think I will go nuts and go all the way, and refit the entire doorway to be more reinforced to protect against those Reebok lock picks.

Heheh, I know you guys wil have fun consulting me on making the ultimate door.

At the very least, using the Mul-T-Lock will prevent drunken confusion, because I don't think there is a single person in the complex that uses Mul-T-Lock, and I know a few use Medeco, and I know for sure everyone carries Medeco keys, because the common pool and complex entry keys are Medeco.

That is the main reason, I chose not to go with Medeco.

-Ed
post #12 of 55
I have multilocks, and I have not found any locksmith in NYC who feels that the locks are easily picked. The most interesting thing about the multilock is that it can't be copied from another key. This means that if you let a guest have a key while they visit, you know that no one can copy the key secretly. It just can't be done. If you need new keys made up for your lock, you have to use the card with the program for the lock on its magnetic strip that you are given when you buy the lock. If, however, you lose the card, you've got to get a new "combination" for your lock which requires a locksmith to visit your house. Also, there are two types of multilock. One with 5 factors and the other with 7 factors. The locks are very secure, and we have had no problems with security since putting them in (around 5 years ago).
post #13 of 55
Thread Starter 
Are hollow metal doors better than solid core wooden ones?

Anyone ever used RediFit Door Prehung Split Frame Steel Door System?
http://www.dunbarton.com/lit/rpd-201.pdf

-Ed
post #14 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
I have multilocks, and I have not found any locksmith in NYC who feels that the locks are easily picked. The most interesting thing about the multilock is that it can't be copied from another key. This means that if you let a guest have a key while they visit, you know that no one can copy the key secretly. It just can't be done. If you need new keys made up for your lock, you have to use the card with the program for the lock on its magnetic strip that you are given when you buy the lock. If, however, you lose the card, you've got to get a new "combination" for your lock which requires a locksmith to visit your house. Also, there are two types of multilock. One with 5 factors and the other with 7 factors. The locks are very secure, and we have had no problems with security since putting them in (around 5 years ago).
Well, no locksmith might do it for you, but someone with access to a CNC milling machine and a probe?
post #15 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Edwood
Are hollow metal doors better than solid core wooden ones?
Yes. There's a reason schools, commercial buildings, college dorms, and countless other buildings use metal doors instead of wood. Even the best wooden door is no match against a chainsaw or even an axe. Cut or chop around the lock area, open sesame. A metal door can be defeated the same way with an oxy-acetylene torch, a plasma cutter, or a hollow magnesium burning bar hooked up to an O2 bottle, which are things that few people have.

Quote:
Anyone ever used RediFit Door Prehung Split Frame Steel Door System?
http://www.dunbarton.com/lit/rpd-201.pdf
Unless this frame's being bolted into a poured concrete wall, it doesn't look much better than a well designed wooden frame. If it's being bolted into wooden studs, it will distribute the forces a bit better than a conventional wooden frame, but it's still awfully vulnerable in the lock/strikeplate area, there's just not enough metal there. 18 gauge steel ain't that strong, it's only about as thick as a credit card. I'd be a lot more comfortable if they made the lock side of the frame out of at least 1/8" thick steel, and preferable 1/4" thick hardened high-strength steel.
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