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Post pics of your builds.... - Page 603

post #9031 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

Read the bloody post, I HAVE GOOGLED IT!!!

 

If you spent more than 5 ADD-riddled seconds on a problem, or bothered to click the damn link I gave you, you would have come across the exact product page that says:

 

This is a circuit for boosting small AC signals for measurement with an oscilloscope, voltmeter, spectrum analyzer, etc. It was specifically designed for testing linear regulator noise, but it’s a fairly generic circuit, so you can probably find other uses for it.

post #9032 of 9594

Hello,

I put here some pictures with Havana, which has fully-upgraded with:

(I enumerate the most important components and which are currently in)

 

V-Cap CuTF - Copper Foil and Teflon Film (0,01uF - 2 pcs. for input; 0,22 uF - 1 pcs. that feeds the Cirrus Logic 8414 digital receiver; 0,01uF for "characteristic" of the sound - 1 pcs;  0,47uF x 2 pcs. for output instead V-Cap OIMP;

Auricap film capacitors by Audience 0,1uF/400V - 7 pcs;

Black Gate electrolytic capacitors; they were installed instead Elna Silmic-I capacitors; ..so, BG FK series 2.200uF/35V - 1 pcs.; F series 100uF/25V - 8 pcs, 220uF/50V - 2 pcs., N series (non-polars) 47uF/50V - 4 pcs.

Elna Silmic-II (470uF/16V - 3 pcs; 100uF/50V - 2 pcs); Elna Rob Tonerex (3.300uF) power filter capacitors -  4 pcs. (Elna ROB Tonerex replaced Elna ROD Starget)

Sanyo Oscons (4,7uF/10V), 10 pcs. Six were implemented on digital section and four on analog section of the dac. Usually they are excellent on digital section only!

Shinkoh Tantalum resistors, near the tube 6 pcs.

K - grade japanese BB PCM-56P chips, 2 pcs.  They were recovered into a Technics cd-player (mod. SL-P 1300);

Bendix 6385 (from 1964) which has replaced with AEG5670 (by Telefunken)

Conectors: WBT 0210-Ag (Ms metal nut "pure silver"), bnc connector;

R-Core transformer;

Skhottky diodes;

Hi-fi tunning fuse (slow)

 

total price $2.500,

 

post #9033 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy View Post

 

If you spent more than 5 ADD-riddled seconds on a problem, or bothered to click the damn link I gave you, you would have come across the exact product page that says:

 

This is a circuit for boosting small AC signals for measurement with an oscilloscope, voltmeter, spectrum analyzer, etc. It was specifically designed for testing linear regulator noise, but it’s a fairly generic circuit, so you can probably find other uses for it.


Sigh~

 

Well... what can I say?

Thanks for telling me this again 7 hours after miceblue told me how to find the product page by adding "amp" at the end.

I already knew what the amp was for before you posted that LMGTFY link, all I said was that it didn't help at all.

post #9034 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

Well... what can I say?

Thanks for telling me this again 7 hours after miceblue told me how to find the product page by adding "amp" at the end.

I already knew what the amp was for before you posted that LMGTFY link, all I said was that it didn't help at all.

 

What can you say? Well, you could try showing some humility when your laziness and inattentiveness is highlighted, instead of getting angry with everybody over your own failings.

 

And what part of......

 

This is a circuit for boosting small AC signals for measurement with an oscilloscope, voltmeter, spectrum analyzer, etc. It was specifically designed for testing linear regulator noise, but it’s a fairly generic circuit, so you can probably find other uses for it.

 

...... do you not understand? The LNMP is a measurement tool.

post #9035 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beefy View Post
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

I already knew what the amp was for before you posted that LMGTFY link

 

Seriously.... read before you start posting?

post #9036 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

so It's a mono amp? what for?

ok, I guess I kinda started this silly argument by posting this before I finished reading the whole product page.

I apologize for that.

I got what it was for shortly afterwards.


but I was seriously offended by LMGTFY due to my past experiences with it.

I don't see what's wrong with making people's life easier by answering a simple questions.

If you don't know the answer simply say so.

If someone asked you what's the date today, would you go and tell him/her to look it up on his/her phone in an insulting manner?

That's just being mean IMO.

post #9037 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by samsquanch View Post

 

BWI!  That's about 10 minutes from where I work, very familiar with the unpleasantness that is that pit...  

 

About 10 years ago when I flew all the time for work, I would use these trips as an excuse to hit up small used music instrument shops and buy weird/rare effects pedals, which I would then have to shove into a tool bag that was already full of electrical tools and scrap bits of wire.  When I got to the airport I would toss my bag on the conveyor along with everything else, wander through the metal detector, then get pulled aside to explain "what the hell is in this bag???"  Mind you I probably looked like a crazed terrorist to them, huge beard, dreaded hair, punk band shirts with anti-american/government/everything slogans on them.  The method I found to work best for getting right through the line was to get overly nerdy about the pedals themselves, go into way too much detail about what this delay pedal did, or how weird this distortion pedal was.  I'd just bore them to tears, SUCCESS!

Haha, great story, luckily for the TSA I don't  fly, almost ever.

post #9038 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

If someone asked you what's the date today, would you go and tell him/her to look it up on his/her phone in an insulting manner?

That's just being mean IMO.

 

If they were sitting in front of a calendar, and asked me today's date...... well yes, I would insult them. It isn't mean, it is anti-stupidity.

post #9039 of 9594

Thats a really nice DAC loserica!

post #9040 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post


*Facepalm*

 

Read the bloody post, I HAVE GOOGLED IT!!!

 

Googleing "LNMP" alone returns nothing reverent, I have no idea it was an amp back then because of the BNC connectors.

 

And that doesn't even answer my question of "what you'd use a monophonic audio amplifier for?"

FEED ME ...

 

No - maybe that's piling on after Beefy's posts, but based on your previous posts, it might be deserved.  Seriously - besides google, all you had to do was look at the user who posted it and could've easily found the current thread right here in the DIY section.

 

If you're really interested in the real-world applicability, understand that any commercial DMM - no matter how good - is not going to discriminate between 0 and 1 mV when attempting to read AC.  Even the very best RMS-AC measuring Flukes can't do better than that.  What's needed is something specifically designed to amplify the AC by 10 or 100 fold so that a DMM can measure the resulting AC (in a DC power supply) in three significant digits precision.

 

Why do we want to do this?  Well, based a lot on Tangent's research as much as anyone else, a linear-regulated power supply for audio has a desired ripple of somewhere between 0 and 1mVAC.  In my experience, something in the range of about 0.075mVAC or less is inaudible.  I believe AMB's Sigma power supplies may perform around 0.006mVAC.  Whether you can hear that difference from 0.075mVAC or not, I might question.  Tangent's early STEPS power supply was the headphone world's ultimate power supply before the Sigma series and provided 0.058mVAC (RMS).  His inexpensive, compact TREAD power supply was capable of 0.060mVAC of ripple.

 

If you want to read a real-world, blow-by-blow account of removing noise from an amplifer power supply using the LNMP, you can refer to this Millett Hybrid MiniMAX page: http://www.diyforums.org/MiniMAX/MiniMAXhistory3.php  The LNMP allowed cetoole and I to try a multitude of different configurations and parts to finally come up with a very respectable performing ~0.045mVAC for the onboard power supply on the MiniMAX.  This was no small problem as we found out, because the very small resistance in any lead length and connectors used to connect a separate power supply to an amp was completely bypassed in the MiniMAX.  This was due to the power supply's location on the same PCB as the rest of the amp circuit.  The only output resistance in the power supply to the amplifier circuit was a small ground plane trace on the PCB.  This upset the conventional wisdom of parts selection at the output of a linear-regulated power supply, because the resistance was much lower than even the connecting leads in a conventional design.  We used a lot of trial-and-error and empirical measurement with the LNMP to come up with a solution.

 

Anyway, the link gives you a real-world account of the value in using the LNMP in actual practice.


Edited by tomb - 2/26/13 at 7:10pm
post #9041 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post

FEED ME ...

 

No - maybe that's piling on after Beefy's posts, but based on your previous posts, it might be deserved.  Seriously - besides google, all you had to do was look at the user who posted it and could've easily found the current thread right here in the DIY section.

 

Hm... would you have thought of that if you knew absolutely nothing about the device and goggling "LNMP" returns nothing useful?

If so, then fair enough, my bad.

It didn't occur to me that I could do that.

 

If you're really interested in the real-world applicability, understand that any commercial DMM - no matter how good - is not going to discriminate between 0 and 1 mV when attempting to read AC.  Even the very best RMS-AC measuring Flukes can't do better than that.  What's needed is something specifically designed to amplify the AC by 10 or 100 fold so that a DMM can measure the resulting AC (in a DC power supply) in three significant digits precision.

 

That's not true.

Take the Tektronix DMM4020 for example.

 

Why do we want to do this?  Well, based a lot on Tangent's research as much as anyone else, a linear-regulated power supply for audio has a desired ripple of somewhere between 0 and 1mVAC.  In my experience, something in the range of about 0.075mVAC or less is inaudible.  I believe AMB's Sigma power supplies may perform around 0.006mVAC.  Whether you can hear that difference from 0.075mVAC or not, I might question.  Tangent's early STEPS power supply was the headphone world's ultimate power supply before the Sigma series and provided 0.058mVAC (RMS).  His inexpensive, compact TREAD power supply was capable of 0.060mVAC of ripple.

 

I've never had to use such a device because I have a desktop DMM that measures down to 1µV and a digital oscilloscope with built-in input scaling features.

(well... ok, they're not really mine, but I have access to them.)

 

If you want to read a real-world, blow-by-blow account of removing noise from an amplifer power supply using the LNMP, you can refer to this Millett Hybrid MiniMAX page: http://www.diyforums.org/MiniMAX/MiniMAXhistory3.php  The LNMP allowed cetoole and I to try a multitude of different configurations and parts to finally come up with a very respectable performing ~0.045mVAC for the onboard power supply on the MiniMAX.  This was no small problem as we found out, because the very small resistance in any lead length and connectors used to connect a separate power supply to an amp was completely bypassed in the MiniMAX.  This was due to the power supply's location on the same PCB as the rest of the amp circuit.  The only output resistance in the power supply to the amplifier circuit was a small ground plane trace on the PCB.  This upset the conventional wisdom of parts selection at the output of a linear-regulated power supply, because the resistance was much lower than even the connecting leads in a conventional design.  We used a lot of trial-and-error and empirical measurement with the LNMP to come up with a solution.

 

Anyway, the link gives you a real-world account of the value in using the LNMP in actual practice.

 

I guess the amp circuit has a pretty low PSRR, I've never encountered this problem before but good job! biggrin.gif


Edited by b1o2r3i4s5 - 2/26/13 at 10:40pm
post #9042 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by b1o2r3i4s5 View Post

 

If you're really interested in the real-world applicability, understand that any commercial DMM - no matter how good - is not going to discriminate between 0 and 1 mV when attempting to read AC.  Even the very best RMS-AC measuring Flukes can't do better than that.  What's needed is something specifically designed to amplify the AC by 10 or 100 fold so that a DMM can measure the resulting AC (in a DC power supply) in three significant digits precision.

That's not true.

Take the Tektronix DMM4020 for example.

http://www.tek.com/datasheet/digital-multimeter/dmm4020-digital-multimeters

 

Under AC Input Characteristics, using the 200mV range and set to slow, the minimum resolution of the DMM4020 is 1mV. It's not rated for sub 1mV measurements.

 

edit: Read the spec sheet wrong, disregard. On the flip side I do believe that tomb was referring to hand held meters...


Edited by Nebby - 2/27/13 at 3:20pm
post #9043 of 9594

Way too much hating going on, everyone should just take a step back and try... chill vibes!

 

anyway, as to give me a reason to post here, I've got a pic of a work in progress. No longer will I be carrying around an eclipse can that looks like unexploded ordinance. Bought myself a really tiny little case that will just squeeze in the 9v and amp, with a little persuasion.

 

so far I've just wired up the power supply end and sorted out the layout in the case so that I can etch and make the main pcb tomorrow. I also have a few high grade panasonic caps I'm using this time, will be interested to see if I can notice a difference. 

 

going to have to experient with volume and gain resistor ratios on this, i'm using a 2 way high/low volume switch to save space. the case is slightly smaller than an altoids can and a fair bit thinner too. over all maybe 5-15 mm in all dimensions smaller, so ti's a pretty tight fit.

 

here's a pic of the work in progress

 

btw, i'm making a new board for it, that's the one I've been using up until now in the bomb shaped case

 

peace

chris


Edited by crispchicken - 2/27/13 at 6:42am
post #9044 of 9594
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nebby View Post

http://www.tek.com/datasheet/digital-multimeter/dmm4020-digital-multimeters

 

Under AC Input Characteristics, using the 200mV range and set to slow, the minimum resolution of the DMM4020 is 1mV. It's not rated for sub 1mV measurements.

Wut? I'm pretty sure that says 1µV on slow at the 200mV row......

 


Edited by b1o2r3i4s5 - 2/27/13 at 7:11am
post #9045 of 9594

If there's a high-quality bench meter that can get down that low ... fine.  Some of us don't consider bench meters in our repertoire - might as well get a scope, IMHO.  The small investment in an RMS-quality handheld and an LNMP don't come close to the expense of the bench.

 

Regardless, I agree with crispchicken.  This is supposed to be a pics of your builds thread, not the lengthy discussions and arguments you've started, b102r3i4s5.  Yeah, I agree the rest of us deserve some blame, too.

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