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That analog sound - Page 3

post #31 of 40
Not that I've compared the two, but I suspect my dac is less euphonic than most tubed cdps including the nuvista and the unico cdp (although the unico helps in that dept!). What it is though, is liquid! Its not something that grabs you at first (like the phenomenal soundstaging does) , but something that creeps up on you slowly, and when you try to listen to a lesser system, you suddenly know what the term 'grainy' means! It also is eminently listenable, separating out music that's otherwise congested and cluttered, turning music that's almost unlistenable listenable, and rendering well recorded music so beautifully. I also love the sense of timing tubes give you..nothing compares to the sound of fast jazz drumming through tubes!

I've heard the mullards can be a little too 'syrupy' for some - sound great but lose on the timing (or PRaT) factor! As I said though, can't confirm that one yet. I've been told the amperex holland bugle boys are a good bet in 12AU7 form!

cheers!
post #32 of 40
Too many manufacturer's seem to try and make their digital products more "analogue" like by adding tubes and/or softening up the sound. But that's not how decent vinyl sounds at all.

I have as much or more detail out of my vinyl than and digital I've heard in my system. It's just that the vinyl has more palpability to it and does not suffer from those hi-fi symptoms that makes things sound too clinical and antiseptic.

Yes, a $500 turntable & cartridge will give you sound that those very good $3000 CD players and DAC's can match. But a $1500 analogue setup will crush most any digital - even SACD and DVD-A. Now, find something in the $4000-5000 category for a used price (like a Well Tempered mated with a decent Dynavector MC cartridge and a tubed phono stage, like an EAR) and you'll never want to go back to digital at all, except to keep trying to make it sound more like my vinyl does - which is where I'm at these days.

Enjoy,
Bob
post #33 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobM

Yes, a $500 turntable & cartridge will give you sound that those very good $3000 CD players and DAC's can match. But a $1500 analogue setup will crush most any digital - even SACD and DVD-A. Now, find something in the $4000-5000 category for a used price (like a Well Tempered mated with a decent Dynavector MC cartridge and a tubed phono stage, like an EAR) and you'll never want to go back to digital at all, except to keep trying to make it sound more like my vinyl does - which is where I'm at these days.

Enjoy,
Bob
I couldn't disagree wth that statement more than I already do. I have listened to a number of fairly expensive turntables ranging from $2400 and up and I had gotten more detail, greater dynamic range, greater frequency extension and less compression out of $1000 CD players. You REALLY have to go up the vinyl food chain to approach the sound quality of a decent CD player. If you want to play vinyl, then play vinyl, but as far as I'm concerned, you'll have to spend 3-4x as much to get the same sound fidelity.
post #34 of 40
Thread Starter 
Let me clarify some things. I like vinyl a lot, I will probably get something used for $300-$400. But I am only 17, and I'm trying to save up for a system for college next year by working 20 hours a week for 7.25 an hour. That's a $290 paycheck every two weeks in case you're wondering. The only thing I have right now is an old pioneer reciever with a headphone jack to hook my speakers up to. It makes me cringe to think about getting a turntable and a cartridge for $500, a phono box for $130, not to mention interconnects for $150, and I wouldn't even have a library to listen to. The cd system I was going to set up would be a total of $375, a voodoochile tushi 3960 and audiogeek nitrogens, with a ppx3-6sn7 soon to follow. I was trying to find it's vinyl equivelent or something near there. Under some of the reasoning in this thread, A $500 vinyl system can beat a $1500 dollar cd system in most cases. So surely a $300 turntable and cartridge can sound better than a $500 cd player.

How does this sound: a TD180 from ebay for $200, A Grado Red cartridge for $110, audiogeek nitrogens $140? If vinyl has such a high bang for the buck factor at higher levels, there should be a budget turntable/cartridge combo that beats the sox off of any cd system in the same price range.
post #35 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobM
Too many manufacturer's seem to try and make their digital products more "analogue" like by adding tubes and/or softening up the sound. But that's not how decent vinyl sounds at all.

I have as much or more detail out of my vinyl than and digital I've heard in my system. It's just that the vinyl has more palpability to it and does not suffer from those hi-fi symptoms that makes things sound too clinical and antiseptic.

Yes, a $500 turntable & cartridge will give you sound that those very good $3000 CD players and DAC's can match. But a $1500 analogue setup will crush most any digital - even SACD and DVD-A. Now, find something in the $4000-5000 category for a used price (like a Well Tempered mated with a decent Dynavector MC cartridge and a tubed phono stage, like an EAR) and you'll never want to go back to digital at all, except to keep trying to make it sound more like my vinyl does - which is where I'm at these days.

Enjoy,
Bob
Each to their own, Bob.

You seem to miss the point when it comes to organisations such as Unison Research, who are a traditional high-end valve-amp manufacturer in the first place. The sound of my CDP isn't by any stretch of the imagination 'softened up'. In fact, its one of the most dynamic-sounding CDP's in the $2000 ball-park (and it is Unison Research's only digital product).

http://www.unisonresearch.com

I know how the more expensive Michell Gyrodecs and Rega P9's sound. I've heard SME and Nottingham Analogue decks so I have a very good idea of what they sound like - which is very good indeed. But detail? Only the SME comes near CD when it comes to resolution, and especially, bass depth for instance. The Michell on the other hand has a very tight, clinical, almost cd like, sound.

As I said, I'm going to be upgrading my vinyl at some point... if only because it isn't up to scratch with the rest of my 'analogue sounding' rig.
post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Puddleglum
How does this sound: a TD180 from ebay for $200, A Grado Red cartridge for $110, audiogeek nitrogens $140? If vinyl has such a high bang for the buck factor at higher levels, there should be a budget turntable/cartridge combo that beats the sox off of any cd system in the same price range.
Great budget set-up. The Thorens TD180 is a decent deck. Will destroy similarly priced NAD, Marantz and Rotel CDPs.
post #37 of 40
i think Aman is right, ok, i've never heard good TT, but after reading different message-boards: the high-end TT's are late 60's-70's. micro seiki's are very good ones. before i bought my cdp i was thinking to buy a micro seiki..now, i havne't got a budget to buy a good micro seiki, let alone the EMT's
post #38 of 40
Puddleglum, all good on your idea. Ditch the grado red tho, and go for a AT440ML for like $80 you can't beat it

cheers
post #39 of 40

Subgenius. !!

post #40 of 40

This thread was very interesting!  I too am on the path to find that sweet analog sound.

 

My friend and I recently observed that really great analog recordings from the 70's sounded better on CD (or even .mp3) than any of the newer all-digital recordings. So, we set started a research project to determine why. Our theory was that whatever is special about good analog recordings, to some extent, is preserved when it's converted to digital. The logical implication here is that maybe it's possible to alter digital recordings to sound "analog".  After a series of tests, we found something...something that is outside of the normal "why analog sounds better than digital" arguments. (eq, gain, compression, saturation, etc)

To test the clue, we developed a software application to make alterations to the sound of some digital recordings.  We ran some tests and....wow! In just a few shorts months we have developed a sophisticated set of algorithms that pull the mask off of all-digital recordings.  To us, this is potentially a game changer....which brings me to the reason for this post!

We have something that sounds really good to our ears and the ears of our pro-audio and musician friends. But we are interested in your opinion.  We are hoping to find some volunteers that are willing to send us files for processing and give us feedback on the results.  This is purely research - and totally free.

If you are interested, please contact me at fideliquest@gmail.com.  We would love to get your opinion and see what you think!

 

Cheers,

 

Jayson Tomlin

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