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DIY Planar magnetic heapdhones in details - Page 2

post #16 of 44

Hi Garuspik,

 

Your headphones look very well made.  How thick is your diaphragm and where do you buy it from?  How do you mask the copper on your diaphragm and how do you etch it?

 

Seeing your pictures making me want to build them too.

 

Wachara C.

post #17 of 44
Thread Starter 

You haven't seen my headphones yet. Those are only prototypes ;)

I've used Pyralux from dupont. It's 12 um of polyimide and 7 um of copper. I order mask to company that makes pcb's for microelectronics.

post #18 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garuspik View Post
 

You haven't seen my headphones yet. Those are only prototypes ;)

I've used Pyralux from dupont. It's 12 um of polyimide and 7 um of copper. I order mask to company that makes pcb's for microelectronics.

 

Thanks for the info.  :bigsmile_face:

 

Looking forward to seeing your headphones.  :beerchug:

post #19 of 44
Thread Starter 

First I've assembled headphones with some noname chinese headband. Cups I've made from aluminium. And with all that things I came into very friendly (at least to me ;) ) audiophile store that specializes in  headphones.

 

 

 

 

 

Several people made listening tests of almost all available planar top headphones (oppo pm-1, Hifiman he-1000, audeze he-4) and dynamic top - Hifiman Hd-800.

 

That's me with my odd-job on head

 

That's again me, with perplexity on face why Aydeze he-4 costs so much?

 

I was encouraged with achieved and what is more important I was encouraged with reviews of other people.

 

What were the major bonuses in my headphones in comparison with planar top:

 

1. Overwhelming dynamics. It was like a big speaker with 15'' woofer vs bookshelf. Both can have 40 hz -3 db but you always clearly hear what is effortless reproduction of musiс and what is not.

2. Higher detailing in comparison to audeze, same level with He-1000.

 

Major minuses

Crooked tonal balance (headphones were almost without damping). That's a lot work to do.

 

After that test I relized that I NEED to build good headphones cause I'm absolutely not impressed by top headphones (especially when I read price tag).

 

p.s. I'm new to head-fi, yet not new in hi-fi. Never owned good portative system, but have an expereince in speaker building. Why not to build smth new?

post #20 of 44

amazing, well done :)

post #21 of 44
Very nice!
post #22 of 44

Awesome work!

I hope you'll be updating this thread with the newer revision.

 

Also you should start thinking about giving them a name :)

post #23 of 44
Thread Starter 

I want to make my own headband. What are main goals?

 

1. Comfortable

2. Lighweight

3. Reliable

4. Easy to make

 

What I have: cnc router, laser cutting machine, plastic injection machine (but don't want to make moulds for prototypes). That's what I designed:

 

And that's what I achieved (not final look! Joints are temporary and that's still a draft)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leather band cutted with laser

 

And with stitching. That part is final.

 

That's how I made cow leather earpads:

 

As you see they are angled and have big opening (75 mm).During my experiments I achieved best sound with such shape.

With all those parts soon I'll make first 'alpha' version that should look closer to final unit.

post #24 of 44

I think using diametrically magnetized cylindrical magnets would be better than using bar magnets. It would be like the Ether flows but without the complex 3D printed wave guides. I found a place to order them but they will have to be custom made.https://www.kjmagnetics.com/custom.asp

post #25 of 44

WOW awesome. Great work :beerchug:

 

I am definitely interested in making a pair of planars at some point. Probably after I have a few pairs of electrostatics up and running. Is this the same stuff you use for diaphragms? Would you mind providing the details of the company that makes your masks?

 

@mitchell2001 brings up an interesting point, although a properly designed waveguide or "fazors" should produce even less turbulence than cylindrical magnets.

 

Also, that's an awesome hifi store.


Edited by 100VoltTube - 4/19/17 at 1:00pm
post #26 of 44

is this post still alive? very good looking traces can you write about your etching process a little bit more much appropriated 

post #27 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garuspik View Post
 

For membrane I use Dupont Pyralux. It's some sort of kapton + copper. I've achieved 0.15 width of trace.

Here photos of my first headphone prototype.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nice work, but I think you can increase the trace area.

post #28 of 44
What's the technical reason behind the snake-like shape of the foil in planar magnetic designs? Increased resistance? Less mass? Ignoring the drive requirements for a moment, would an unetched piece of foil work just the same? I would think the larger conductive surface area and wider magnetic field would give it more uniform control.
post #29 of 44

It's similar to increasing the number of turns in a regular coil, it helps increase the magnetic field. The more turns you can squeeze in the stronger the field will be.

 

The trade off being as you increase the turn density the tracks have to get thinner, increasing their resistance, so there's an optimum limit for each design based on the available space or volume.

 

A single sheet would have little magnetic field (half a turn worth), but could have a large surface area, which would be good for electric field, so would be better run as an electrostatic.

post #30 of 44
Ah, now I see, it's a flat coil.
What is the average current requirement to get a planar magnetic driver to perform at comfortably loud levels?
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