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Frequency Response for Classical and Acoustic Music

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
this might be slightly off topic, but what is the highest frequency ( i guess it will be in KhZ) that classical music gets to? I am wondering whether the 16 kHz in the ER6i I just ordered will be enough for a good reproduction of classical music.
In general, does acoustic music go over the 16 kHz range or is it only electronic that does it?
Many thanks
post #2 of 4
Acoutic instruments have harmonics that can extend far above the generally accepted human hearing threshold of 20kHz, so it is more likely that overall sound quality qould be limited by the frequency of redbook audio CD's. I will say that I can notice the lack of treble extension from canalphones to full-size cans, though I haven't notice it reduce my musical enjoyment.
post #3 of 4
(found this old post when doing a search on topic = classical)

A few comments:

(a) the interval from 16 kHz to 20 kHz is only two whole notes or four half-notes (B9 = 15804 Hz to D sharp 10 = 19912 Hz), which is a pretty small range. Especially since there are only "overtones", not fundamental notes of any common acoustic instrument, in this range.

(b) many audiophiles and music fans, depending on their age and gender, probably can't hear anything above 16 kHz. If that worries you, consider that many of the greatest performances of classical music are by artists or conductors who were presumably missing that range at the time of the performance. (And let's not even think about Beethoven's later compositions )

(c) Quoting Iron Dreamer "Acoustic instruments have harmonics that can extend far above the generally accepted human hearing threshold of 20kHz, so it is more likely that overall sound quality could be limited by the frequency of redbook audio CD's."
Following up on that thought, frequencies above 20kHz could affect perceived "sound quality" only if human hearing extends above the generally accepted human hearing threshold. I've read that there have been tests of human hearing where a tone of about 30kHz is played at 20 or 30 dB higher (100 to 1000 times the power) than typical SPLs for harmonics of acoustic instruments, with never a positive result, i.e. absolutely no recognition that the 30 kHz tone is "on" vs. "off".
post #4 of 4
But further ...

(d) in spite of all of the above, I would lean against ordering a headphone for classical music that was rated by the vendor as "cutting off at 16 kHz". First, if it cuts off at 16 kHz, then the frequency response is probably weak in at least the half-octave below that (11 kHz - 16 kHz). Further, vendor specifications are often optimistic. Poor response down to 8 or 10 kHz will affect harmonics that even I can hear.
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