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A newbie question !

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

For fast electronic music what is important

 

 

what is the difference with this maximum hz if its 20,000 or 32000 for an example is it important, what this hz stands for ?

also if i want to heer deep bass on fast beats per minute is it important my headphones to have high hz or only db ?

post #2 of 4

Your ears can't hear frequencies past 20000 Hz, anything over that is not important for any type of music. Don't worry about what headphone specs say about frequency response because those numbers are not useful.

 

Bass is in the lower frequencies. If you want to hear deep bass, look for a headphone that is described as having clean, emphasized and/or extended bass. Impressions, comparisons, and recommendations of headphones will be more useful than spec sheets. I don't listen to electronic music or have much experience with a variety of headphones so I can't really give a recommendation there. Perhaps someone else will.

post #3 of 4

While some headphones with extended frequency response are able to handle audible frequencies better than headphones that don't (due to technical mechanical stuff), it's not a rule. So yeah, don't worry about the frequency range specs.

 

What you want to look at are measurements, like the type published here:

 

http://www.innerfidelity.com/headphone-data-sheet-downloads

 

(Of course, you'll need to learn how to interpret them. That is beyond the scope of this thread.)

post #4 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by betudontbet View Post
 

For fast electronic music what is important

 

 

what is the difference with this maximum hz if its 20,000 or 32000 for an example is it important, what this hz stands for ?

also if i want to heer deep bass on fast beats per minute is it important my headphones to have high hz or only db ?


Hertz (Hz) is a measure of frequency, in this case, it's the frequency of the sound wave per second.  A wave, but definition is from one peak to the next peak.  Therefore, 1 Hz would be 1 wave (measured from peak to peak) per second.  You can't hear a 1 Hz signal.  dB on the other hand is a measure of amplitude, this is the size of the wave in question.  Definition-wise, this tells you nothing.  

 

Some more facts before we continue.  The average human hearing range is 20 Hz - 20 kHz (1 kHz = 1000 Hz).  Though some people may be able to hear beyond that, most don't.  Even if you can, music is rarely recorded with microphones that go above that range.  Additionally, as you get older, than 20 kHz figure drops significantly due to hearing loss.  Though it's possible to feel something below 20 Hz, you physically can't hear it.  As you go down lower, it's felt more.  

 

Now, a 20 Hz - 20 kHz range is the standard, but it's split up logarithmically.  So the split isn't as even as you'd like.  The actual cuts are grey area, but bass generally goes from 20 Hz up to 250 - 500 Hz.  The midrange starts where the bass ends and goes up to about 4 kHz (this is even greater grey area, some feel it ends earlier, some later).  After that, you get the treble regions.  The ranges below 20 Hz are known as infrasonic (below our hearing) while anything above your hearing range is known as ultrasonic (above our hearing).  

 

With that said, you'll want bass that can go down low if you want a strong bass.  However, lots of percussion and drums also utilize the lower treble regions (like the snare drums) which add to your punch and a lot of the time, speed (though speed can also be controlled by taming the mid bass regions (say, the area around 125-200 Hz, note, these numbers are not concrete!).  The world of audio as it pertains specifically to frequency response is still not fully known or understood.  The correlation is there, but the actual relationship really hasn't been uncovered 100%.  

 

On some final notes.  Just because a headphone says it gets response between 20 Hz and 20 kHz doesn't mean it does.  Here on Head-Fi, we have a term called roll-off (can also be written roll off) which is a number (or area/section) where the amplitude (dB) begins to drop to zero.  This happens for both ends of the spectrum.  So even if a headphone does get 20 Hz - 20 kHz response, it could very well begin rolling off (as many do) at 100 Hz and 10 kHz.  You can also get dips and valleys throughout the frequency response.  As stated above, there are 3rd parties that measure headphones, and they give good measurements.  But keep in mind what I have said above about the correlation and relationship.  

 

For fast electronic music, I would suggest good, deep bass with a controlled mid bass and good treble response to get the instrumentals in.  This will help out much with the percussion and many instruments that are replaced with electronics.  The controlled mid bass will help with speed.  

 

The final thing I will say is if you are looking for headphone suggestions, please ask.  Specs only tell you so much, and at times, it's very little that it gives you.  

 

Welcome to Head-Fi BTW.  


Edited by tinyman392 - 8/11/15 at 7:10pm
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