Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Beethoven Symphonies
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Beethoven Symphonies - Page 40

post #586 of 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottder
Was slipping through HD channels last night and turned on WGBH to find MTT conducting the Eroica on a new series called Keeping Score. Was an excellent performance, I'd call it pretty balanced overall, just enjoyed the HD picture and 5.1 surround on this. Well filmed and the sound was pretty good (didn't seem like there was much going to my sub, lows were a tad attenuated). Looks like it will be an interesting series.

Scott

PS - It will be available on DVD soon as well. (Website)
I tivo'd that! Hope I'll have time to listen soon; then I can compare that with the BBC movie, Eroica (J.E. Gardiner and ORR do the actual music making) and Lenny's Eroica lecture.

Btw, for all Beethoven Fans, Copying Beethoven is opening in a theater near you very soon. Ed Harris IS Beethoven, etc. Anyway, it's a fictionalized account of how LvB composed the 9th, with the help of his beautiful, blonde amanuensis (Diane Kruger of National Treasure -- another history-fantasy). From what I've heard, they use Haitinck's Concertgebouw 9th rather than a more HIP recording for the soundtrack. Will wonders never cease?


Ed Harris as Beethoven leading some orchestra in Hungary. I'm told that he conducts on the beat.
post #587 of 944
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears
I tivo'd that! Hope I'll have time to listen soon; then I can compare that with the BBC movie, Eroica (J.E. Gardiner and ORR do the actual music making) and Lenny's Eroica lecture.
Excellent, let me know what you think of it.
post #588 of 944
Quote:
Copying Beethoven
Gee, I thought we were finally past the era of "[verbing][proper noun]" movie titles...
post #589 of 944

For a change

I still hold out for Herbert Bloomstedt
Dresden State Orchestra
post #590 of 944
I have just spent an afternoon with all of Vänskä's Beethoven! I started with the Eroica/B8, then progressed to the Chorale and finally finished with the B4/5. Listening to all three together is incredibly impressive, especially in SACD multichannel sound. For sound quality alone, this set is certainly "da bomb!" Add to that first rate interpretations and performances on a level equal to the sound quality and so far, this is probably the Beethoven cycle that will be setting the standard for modern orchestra/scaled down performance. It's just an incredibly achievement that has me waiting and drooling in anticipation of the last two cds (B1, B2, B6, B7 not yet out). I'm hoping I don't have to wait too long for them. Vänskä and the Minnesota O. are going to be in NYC at Carnegie Hall sometime in the spring of '07, so I guess I'll be picking up tickets very soon.

Meanwhile, I'm still sitting on the fence about ordering more of the Dausgaard. DA, you were so correct about the ruinous price point! I'd be in wounded wallet shock if I actually bought all the the cds in the basket at arkiv.

I finally watched the MTT Eroica lecture/performance that I tivoed. I understand that the Stravinsky (or Copland?) is next. It was very good. I suppose I should listen to Lenny's lecture again but truth to tell, I'd rather spend the time with the music and forget the lectures.
post #591 of 944
Does anyone own or has anyone listened to Paul Kletzki's recordings with the Czech Philharmonic? It's on the Supraphon label. I've read some good things about it, and they come pretty cheap in three volumes. Not too much of a risk involved, but just curious if others had an opinion.
post #592 of 944

Agreeing belatedly

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyson View Post
Not at all, I'm a Dohnanyi fan, I think he follows in the Szell/Toscanini mould very well, and its a style that I think is extremely fruitful in a lot of music. I really like the more subtle, less heavy handed interpretations that result.
I just commented on his 9th symphony a few hours ago. While he himself said "We play well, and George Szell gets a great review" he did some wonderful things during his tenure.
post #593 of 944
While I agree that the conductors that followed Szell in Cleveland got somewhat lost in his shadow, it did happen for a reason. Szell made the orchestra what it was/is. Before he took over, it was not considered one of the premier American orchestras. By the time he left, there was not a more precise, well-oiled orchestral machine anywhere in the world. And that legacy lived on long after he left. So while the conducters that followed him deserve recognition for their own personal interpretations and their own influence, a lot of the credit for the wonderful talents of the orchestra as a whole still belonged to Szell.

-Jay
post #594 of 944
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears View Post
I have just spent an afternoon with all of Vänskä's Beethoven! I started with the Eroica/B8, then progressed to the Chorale and finally finished with the B4/5. Listening to all three together is incredibly impressive, especially in SACD multichannel sound. For sound quality alone, this set is certainly "da bomb!" Add to that first rate interpretations and performances on a level equal to the sound quality and so far, this is probably the Beethoven cycle that will be setting the standard for modern orchestra/scaled down performance. It's just an incredibly achievement that has me waiting and drooling in anticipation of the last two cds (B1, B2, B6, B7 not yet out). I'm hoping I don't have to wait too long for them. Vänskä and the Minnesota O. are going to be in NYC at Carnegie Hall sometime in the spring of '07, so I guess I'll be picking up tickets very soon.
I've been sitting on the fence on picking these up, I have yet to hear anything bad about this cycle, just when I look around at how many cycles, not to mention individual CD and SACDs I have, hard to justify to my wallet and my wife

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bunnyears View Post
I finally watched the MTT Eroica lecture/performance that I tivoed. I understand that the Stravinsky (or Copland?) is next. It was very good. I suppose I should listen to Lenny's lecture again but truth to tell, I'd rather spend the time with the music and forget the lectures.
I've caught all of them and highly recommend them to the classical newcomer and old timer alike. They have a Tchaikovsky one on DVD at Netflix, I have it in queue and the others should be out in DVD form in short order. I wish they had done more in the series. But it looks like they pack a lot into the program.

Scott
post #595 of 944
HMV Japan to the rescue...........

Intsead of quickly draining my wallet by getting new Vanska or even quicker by getting new Dausgaard Cds I found some lost oldies.

Jochum/LSO/Disky 1977-78
This is the OOP late 1970s stereo EMI set that Jochum made in addition to the DG mono/stereo set from the 1950s. Currently only sold on Dutch label Disky in very generic graphic packaging, just started listening but sounds great in a style similar to his EMI Brahms set made also during this time, amazing that this great set is OOP so I had to put it in the buy basket.

Mravinsky/Venezia 1,3,4,5,6,7 1958-82
Collection of live Beethoven recordings made in Moscow and Lenningrad played in the style you expect after hearing Mravinsky's famous Tchaikovsky 4,5,6 set.......strap in for a wild ride here.
post #596 of 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundsGood View Post
Does anyone own or has anyone listened to Paul Kletzki's recordings with the Czech Philharmonic? It's on the Supraphon label. I've read some good things about it, and they come pretty cheap in three volumes. Not too much of a risk involved, but just curious if others had an opinion.
SG I have the Kletzki set, comes in three 2CD volumes.
I have kept it in my permanent collection but don't listen to it much, and it is good but nothing outstanding or unique for me, if I could only keep 5 sets Kletzki would not be one of them. For collectors with many sets worth getting.
post #597 of 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkAngel View Post
Mravinsky/Venezia 1,3,4,5,6,7 1958-82
Collection of live Beethoven recordings made in Moscow and Lenningrad played in the style you expect after hearing Mravinsky's famous Tchaikovsky 4,5,6 set.......strap in for a wild ride here.
I'm pretty sure Beethoven in the style of Mravinsky's Tchaik 4,5,6 wouldn't rub me the right way. Do you like it, or do you see it more as a novelty?

-Jay
post #598 of 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayG View Post
I'm pretty sure Beethoven in the style of Mravinsky's Tchaik 4,5,6 wouldn't rub me the right way. Do you like it, or do you see it more as a novelty?

-Jay
I guess you could say it is a novelty, I look at it as pushing the envelope and perhaps making you rethink what can be done differently with Beethoven after hearing so many similar sounding sets. After hearing Mravinsky's Tchaikovsky 4,5,6 made me rethink things compared to more typical Karajan, Jansons, Markevitch, Muti etc

Same as Celi EMI Bruckner set, very different sounding and pushes the envelope even if you would never want it as your only set.

If you are fan of Barenboim, Walter etc old style LVB then Mravinsky will not be your cup of tea......
post #599 of 944
I am sure that, in some quarters, Savall's interpretation of the Eroica is still considered a novelty, and its current unavailability would seem to support the assumption that it is merely a novelty, except that many lovers of Beethoven's music think it has got the status of a classic. More than any other performance using period instruments I have heard, this actually convinces me that part of the music's "spirit" actually resides in the way it sounds i.e. bold bits of orchestration for peculiar effects and/or emotional purposes.

post #600 of 944
Quote:
Originally Posted by Masolino View Post
I am sure that, in some quarters, Savall's interpretation of the Eroica is still considered a novelty, and its current unavailability would seem to support the assumption that it is merely a novelty, except that many lovers of Beethoven's music think it has got the status of a classic. More than any other performance using period instruments I have heard, this actually convinces me that part of the music's "spirit" actually resides in the way it sounds i.e. bold bits of orchestration for peculiar effects and/or emotional purposes.

I've heard some interesting (and conflicting) things about that recording.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Music
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Music › Beethoven Symphonies