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Is it possible to combine Headphones and a Subwoofer?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello Head-Fi Community!

 

I have a somewhat weird question!

 

I would like to know if its possible to combine the intimate sound quality of headphones with a dedicated subwoofer to have crystal clear sound and bass that you can feel!

 

Can some one possibly test and see what its like if they have the equipment?

 

I would like to experience this song with bass that you can feel!

 

Would a BIC America F12 sub work for this?

 

If this is possible, how should it be done correctly for best effect?

 

If its not possible, can you describe a little about why its not a good idea.

 

Thank you very much!

 

My Current Setup

DAC:  Shiit Audio Modi
AMP: Shiit Audio Magni

Headphones: Sony MDR XB-1000

post #2 of 7

I guess you could just split the signal from your DAC, one to the headphone amp, one to a sub.

 

I've heard of other people doing this with headphones like AKG K1000 with reportedly 'more than satisfactory' results.

post #3 of 7
You might hear a sound delay from the distance between the subwoofer and headphone drivers. Maybe you'd be better off buying a bass shaker and attaching it to where you sit when you listen.
post #4 of 7
True bass and sub-bass is about pressure. The room must be pressurized by the subwoofer. Only then will you get that visceral feel of bass that you get in a theater or club. Some of that can be approximated by fooling your senses with bass shakers or exaggerated response at higher bass frequencies - but it's still not the same experience as true low-frequency SPL.

So - why are you using headphones instead of speakers? Is it purely because of cost, or is it also because speakers would bother others around you? If you fire-up a subwoofer with enough output to pressurize an average-sized room, your neighbors will not be happy.
post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddTheMetalGod View Post

You might hear a sound delay from the distance between the subwoofer and headphone drivers. Maybe you'd be better off buying a bass shaker and attaching it to where you sit when you listen.

+1

If you don't own the subwoofer already, attaching a bass shaker to your chair might be the better approach for providing the tactile feel. Maybe something like the Buttkicker Gamer: http://www.buttkickergear.com/ButtKicker_Gamer2_p/bk-gr.htm

Otherwise, the BIC F12 will not work for what you want. As GREQ pointed out, you would want to split the signal coming from your DAC and connect it to your sub and headphone amp. However, the BIC F12 only has a single RCA input. You would need a sub with dual RCA inputs.
post #6 of 7

Maybe this is what you want mate?

 

http://thesubpac.com/

 

A wearable silent subwoofer. I'd be inclined to think of it as a novelty item but the endorsement list is impressive and it has got a lot of traction already. Worldwide distribution too.

 

This is a cheap but effective widget to convert stereo to mono in hardware.

 

http://www.switchcraft.com/productsummary.aspx?Parent=1062

 

OP would need to source the appropriate cables but that shouldn't be difficult.

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 

Thank you every one!

 

After I posted that question I also did some research online and here is what I found out!

 

It seem that people in the virtual reality, car simulators, and home theaters use this type of thing the most.

 

They claim their is 5 ways to perceive sound, and hearing is just only one of them.

 

From my current limited understanding, for best effect you need to use a combination of both subs and tactile transducers like a bass shaker.

 

Most people that do this seem to have a few sub running in parallel to create the air pressure effect, they are usually turned up past what would be normally comfortably to listen to, but because you don't have speakers, all your getting is the sub and the passive isolation from the headphones balances it out!

 

The other part to this is tactile transducers, they create the motion or impact effect, and you have to be sitting or attached to something that moves to feel it.


I found out that their are low frequency only and full frequency tactile transducers ( bass shakers ), and that are some are better then others, and that you can build your own out of a speaker.

 

To answer the question above, I do have good speakers, but I specifically want to listen to the SONY MDR XB-1000's and also feel bass.

 

I will have to do more research before I buy anything, but it seems now I know what I want.

 

Thank you every one for helping out, and if you have anything else to add, please do post, for me and for other in the future who read this.


Edited by vokus - 3/16/15 at 12:49pm
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