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Introduction

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Greetings from Jacksonville, Florida. I am new to the audiophile world and have been perusing the Head-fi website since January. I bought a pair of Sennheiser HD 598's. I used to own a Hifiman EF2A but the source selector crapped out on me and I had to return it. I got my refund and ordered a first generation Schiit Modi and Vali along with the Pyst Cables. I won't be able to enjoy those until I return from my TDY. Pink Floyd is probably my most listened to band. I also enjoy Zeppelin, Steely Dan, Dire Straits, and just about all of the MTV Unplugged albums. I just got Beach Boys Pet Sounds album and I was blown away by the recording. Wow is all I can say. I like many different genres of music. As long as I feel something (other than boredom) while listening then I am game!! I have finally talked the wife into letting me collect/build a vintage (late 70's early80's) stereo system which I am pretty psyched about. There's something about a stereo system that is silver with wood grain that drives me nuts (in a good way). It will have a tape deck and a turn table. That's about it. I look forward to reading tons of posts and learning all I can about great sounding music. Cheers and enjoy.

post #2 of 11
Why a tape deck? There is simply nothing good about tape compared to digital audio.

And yes, I actually owned a 1970s stereo (amp, tuner, cassette deck, turntable) *in* the 1970s. smily_headphones1.gif
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

I was under the impression that cassette tapes were recorded in analog. I assumed that a tape would sound really good if it were played through a very good tape deck (I still have quite a few of my old cassettes from when I was a kid). I know tape decks were very good in the early to mid 80's. They got pretty cheaply made once compact disks started being sold. I can get very good tape decks from Ebay for almost nothing. Are they really that bad? Would reel to reel be just as bad? My wife's step dad has a big reel to reel player that I am hoping to get my hands on.  Maybe it will be left to us in his will!!!! :confused: The more feedback I get, the merrier. Keep it coming.

post #4 of 11

Compared  to digital sound tape is never going to come close. That doesn't mean you can't get quality sound with good tapes and a good player. It's apples and oranges. I do miss the day of my favorite tape getting eaten.

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

Sounds like my stereo system will have a turn table and cd player then. LOL @ your favorite tape being eaten. That only happened to me in car stereo tape decks. 

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tfotos77 View Post
 

Sounds like my stereo system will have a turn table and cd player then. LOL @ your favorite tape being eaten. That only happened to me in car stereo tape decks. 


Them also melting in the car LOL

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

is reel to reel worth it? As I stated earlier, my wife's stepdad has a reel to reel that he doesn't use. It is rather large. I don't know much else about it, but I sure am curious.

post #8 of 11
Reel to reel can be worth it if you are looking for a high-quality source for vintage material. There's a lot of junk out there, though and really high-quality reel-to-reel decks have not dropped in price as cassette decks have.

Expect to do a lot of tinkering and investment in keeping the heads aligned. At 7-1/2 ips, you'll get great response and dynamics, but you'll still have a higher noise floor than digital. Still, similar to tubes, it can give a nice analog feel to vintage music.

It's a pretty expensive alternative, though and one that requires a lot fuss compared to digital. For me personally, if you want a distraction from digital, you're better off fooling with a turntable or even a vintage FM tuner with a good outdoor antenna.
post #9 of 11
I think you lose a lot more than you gain when you go back to cassettes. We used cassettes in the 70s because they were much more convenient than 8-tracks and we didn't have any other choices for cars and portable. Yes, they're analog, but the variances & distortion caused by inconsistent tape speed, tape stretching, noise, etc, etc FAR outweigh any digital vs analog argument. Plus, you only like the 3rd song on the second side of the album? Too bad. Your choices are listening to the whole album, or hitting the fast forward button and then playing hide & seek with the start of the song for the next 5-10 minutes.

There is a reason the entire market for cassettes disappeared when CDs appeared...
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

I think you lose a lot more than you gain when you go back to cassettes. We used cassettes in the 70s because they were much more convenient than 8-tracks and we didn't have any other choices for cars and portable. Yes, they're analog, but the variances & distortion caused by inconsistent tape speed, tape stretching, noise, etc, etc FAR outweigh any digital vs analog argument. Plus, you only like the 3rd song on the second side of the album? Too bad. Your choices are listening to the whole album, or hitting the fast forward button and then playing hide & seek with the start of the song for the next 5-10 minutes.

There is a reason the entire market for cassettes disappeared when CDs appeared...


Do you really think you should take any advice from someone with Al Bundy as an avatar.

post #11 of 11
Reel to reel tape is the Best source there is. Most recordings were done on tape. Most cd's were made from those tapes. Look at the hi-fi shows. Reel to reel wins best of show over and over again. I have the cd, vinyl and tape for the same music and the tape blows everything away. I do blind listening tests with driends and neighbors. They all choose the tape version. Jack White and a lot of musicians who care about sound use analog only. Do some more research. Check out The Tape Project and Unted Home Audio to see where high end audio is going.
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