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Sony 25s Wal-Wart

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Anyone have the Radio Shack part # for a wall-wart for this player?

Thanks!
post #2 of 14
originally posted by JML:


"In case anyone goes shopping, here are the Radio Shack numbers (the "M" Adaptaplug comes free with these -- connect with tip negative per careful reading of the instructions, not per your intuition -- the molded "tip" wording is negative, not the side of the plug with the actual tip!). All are off-white, by the way:

#273-1771: 9V, 1500 mA, $22.99 (International series, smaller than the others, regulated, 120/240 VAC, folding plug)

#273-1770: 9V, 800 mA, $13.99 (regulated and filtered)

#273-1612: 9V, 1200 mA, $15.99 (regulated, marked for Sega Genesis)

#273-1611: 9V, 1300 mA, $15.99 (regulated, marked for Nintendo)

#273-1680: 3 to 12V (user switchable), 1000 mA, $34.99 (with seven Adaptaplugs)

#273-1667: 3 to 12V (user switchable), 800 mA, $14.99 (regulated)

#273-1900: 3 to 9V output (user switchable), total mA rating depends on batteries used, NiCad & NiMH 4AA Battery charger and portable powerpack, $39.99 (I'm very curious about this one, because with 4x1800 mA NiMH AAs, this might be a nice option)

#273-1681: 3 to 12V, 1000 mA, $39.99 (AC pass-through socket, i.e., you can plug in a normal AC cord on top of this one, in series)

(No warranties from me, express or implied. I'm just copying what the catalog says. Remember, the switchable voltage units may be more economical, but a mistake with a higher voltage can fry your equipment. All listed adapters exceed the 600 mA rating of the much more expensive Sony adapter.)"
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
great thank you!
post #4 of 14
Quote:
#273-1900: 3 to 9V output (user switchable), total mA rating depends on batteries
used, NiCad & NiMH 4AA Battery charger and portable powerpack, $39.99 (I'm very curious about this one, because with 4x1800 mA NiMH AAs, this might be a nice option)
dcg:

I went to RadioShack immediately after work and purchased the RS #273-1900 charger. I'm blaming it on you. I'm charging 4 NiMh 1600 Mah batteries now. This thing seems to do it all:

1. It's a charger for NiMh batteries. The manual has sticker placed over text that previously mentioned NiCad. It can charge either 2 or 4 AAs.

2. It's an AC to DC Adapter. So it can run via wall-wart.

3. It's a DC to DC converter. So, it can run the D25s either with the rechargeables, or, with alkalines.

Here's the maximum Output Voltage Current (mA) for each output voltage per the booklet:

3,0V + or - 5%=1000mA
4,5V + or - 5%=1000mA
6,0v + or - 5%=1000mA
7.5V + or - 5%=800mA
9.0V + or - 5%=660mA

Charging Current=600mA
Safety Timer=4 hours
Trickle Charge Current=40mA
Battery Leakage Current=<0.5mA
Input Voltage of AC/DC Adapter=AC 90-240V, 50/60Hz
Input Voltage of DC/DC Converter=DC 4-7V

I had my Sony D25s with me. The RS guy didn't have a clue it would run as a battery pack, so I had to argue with him about it. He finally put four alkalines in and I listened to it through some RS headphones. Didn't learn much from that, soundwise.

I'll let you know what I find when I listen here at home. Probably late tonight or tomorrow. If you see any 'red flags' here let me know. I'd hate to hurt my CD!!
post #5 of 14
I'm glad that long Radio Shack catalog listing I prepared was helpful!

ChenaynayC, does the manual say anything about it being a smart charger with circuitry to monitor the state of the batteries, or is it just a fast charger working on a timer? I found one locally, but the box was taped shut and I couldn't look inside.

If it is just a timer, the battery life will suffer. I got an Alltek charger for another unit, http://www.thomasdistributing.com/at-1268.htm, and the info says:

Quote:
Unlike most other "dumb fast chargers", you can safely rapid charge your AA, AAA, Nickel Metal Hydride and NiCD rechargeable batteries regardless of capacity! The microprocessor checks the voltage (-V and +V ), and terminates the charging process and then switches to trickle charge automatically. This is denoted when the charge LED turns from Red to Green. With the ALLTEKā„¢ AT-1268 PRO's intelligent microprocessor design, your batteries will be at their peak performance at all times. The AT-1268 PRO charger uses a pulse charging technique, which will provide a PWM constant pulse current during the various charging stages. Charge time varies with the size, capacity, and charge state of the batteries when put into the charger. However as an example 1600 mAh batteries will charge in about 130 minutes when fully discharged.
post #6 of 14
ChenaynayC - quick, stop what you're doing and blame JML! It's his list, not mine.



JML, hope you don't mind my copying your list here.

Dave
post #7 of 14
Mind? Heck, no. It's all out there.

dcg, I was going to tell you that the next time you get back to KOP and Philadelphia headphone wasteland, we should compare your HD600 and my ATH-W100.
post #8 of 14
JML - Yes we should, except I have the 580. close enoughh?

Where exactly are you in Philly?

(BTW, I'll be home this weekend, but probably won't have a lot of free time. I think I'm home March 2-10 though, so maybe then?)
post #9 of 14
March is better. I have too many student papers to grade this weekend. Contact me via my profile page when you know your schedule (spring break?).

I hope I have my Corda HA-1 by then...
post #10 of 14
Quote:
ChenaynayC, does the manual say anything about it being a smart charger with circuitry to monitor the state of the batteries, or is it just a fast charger working on a timer? I found one locally, but the box was taped shut and I couldn't look inside.
Hey! I'm blaming both of you then. But so far so good. I've started the test this am to see how long it takes for the 'DC Output' light to flash, which means the batteries are low. I don't know what kind of circuitry it has, but I believe the answer to your question is yes. The manual says:

Charging Protection: detects battery charge status and stops charging when the batteries are fully charged.

Safety Guard Timer: automatically stops charging after 4 hoursto prevent battery overcharging.

Alkaline Battery Sensor - detects presence of alkaline batteries and projects the power bank by preventing charging of alkaline batteries.
post #11 of 14
Well, here's the results of test #1:

I began with my unit at work which has no Sony battery in it. I noticed that the display was lit during the entire test. Started her at up at 8:36 a.m and at 11:22 a.m she died. The power pack was still lit - but evidently there wasn't enough power for the D25-S to continue to work.

That's 2 hours and 46 minutes. I don't think that's long enough. The Sony battery alone will last that and maybe longer. I'll try another test tonight on the unit I have at home. I'm curious to see how it works when there is a battery in the Sony. I noticed briefly last night that even though I had the power pack plugged in (didn't notice if the light was lit), when I plugged her in to AC the battery began recharging. So I'm not sure if it was using the Sony battery or the power pack. It would be nice if they worked in succession, wouldn't it?

Well, I guess I should work today! More info on test #2 later. . .
post #12 of 14
If the Sony battery is in the unit, it will show the charge cycle routine, no matter its condition, once you plug in the AC adapter.

Apparently NiMH batteries need to be charged and discharged a couple of times to reach their potential. They don't have the memory effect, but all the info says to do this when new. Try three or four cycles before you start timing, and make sure they came right out of the charge cycle (any storage period means they'll lose power).

The higher the bateries' capacity, the longer they'll run. I am using 4x 1800 mA AA Nexcells in my WM-D6C, and they're great so far. They're supposedly even higher in mA than their rating, and Maha has some 1800 mA out now, too. The output of the NiMH batteries is consistent until they're depleted, and then WHAM, you're shut down all of a sudden. Not much warning at all, and my unit has a battery level monitor.
post #13 of 14
Okay, I'll give them another chance. I clock 'em again after a couple of discharges. Hey wait! I'm anal. I'll clock 'em until they obtain a consistent range! Oh boy . . . .
post #14 of 14

Wow! New adapter makes the diference.

Switched from an older universal AC Adapter that was only rated for 300mA to the RS 273-1667 which is rated at 800 mA. Wow! What a difference. Details, dynamic range, everything. Well worth the $15 or so. btw, a previous post listed this universal AC adapter as being regulated. The box claims that it is regulated AND filtered.
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