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REVIEW: Ultimate Ears UE-10 Pro & Sensaphonics ProPhonic 2X-Soft - Page 7

post #91 of 271
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big D
You've completely missed Lindrone's point as the Sensa cable is replaceable too. Just half way down the cable, not at the earpiece.
Well, that's a different type of cable than the one I have now. The one I have now is fully integrated, and not replaceable unless I send it back to Sensaphonics.

I like the elegance of the integrated cable as opposed to the plug though. I'm still considering switching to the breakaway cable for my 2X-S, because 45" is just a tad too short for me. I don't know it's worth the trade-off. Probably will meet with my audiologist sometime this week to see what's up.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lojay
So, can you tell me the reason why you'd choose the canalphones over the CD3000 or vice versa?
I think you missed this earlier post...


Quote:
Originally Posted by lindrone
I think this review should give a good idea.. I'm too lazy to write another one comparing CD3000 against the UE-10 Pro, but you get the idea...

http://www5.head-fi.org/forums/showthread.php?t=70159

One addendum:

I think 2X-S does have one advantage, because its excellent microdynamic in its decay, and the extra richness and warmth, it gives it a characteristic that stands out apart from the CD3000. Whenever something is outstandingly different from one headphone to another, it really gives you that immediate impact value, and allow you to appreciate it much more easily.

UE-10 sounds more like CD3000 in its colder presentation, although the level of detail is higher and clarity is better. It doesn't have as much of a "differing" characteristic that makes it more special in comparison. However, even though it doesn't have a stand-out, differentiating characteristic, it is still an excellent headphone that I would rate above the CD3000 overall.
I hope the original review, plus the additional comments are enough to answer your question, lojay. If not, let me know if you have any other specific questions.

The reason why I'm still keeping the CD3000's... there are still times when I just don't want to put anything in my ear.
post #92 of 271
Thanks! I was quite surprised I couldn't find that in google's head-fi site search, oh well I'll read them throughly! Thanks a zillion!
post #93 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by lindrone
Well, that's a different type of cable than the one I have now. The one I have now is fully integrated, and not replaceable unless I send it back to Sensaphonics.

I like the elegance of the integrated cable as opposed to the plug though. I'm still considering switching to the breakaway cable for my 2X-S, because 45" is just a tad too short for me. I don't know it's worth the trade-off. Probably will meet with my audiologist sometime this week to see what's up.
Sorry my fault for not making myself clearer. I'd meant to say that it was an option with the Sensas.

See I'm not a UE fanboy entirely!!
post #94 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big D
You've completely missed Lindrone's point as the Sensa cable is replaceable too. Just half way down the cable, not at the earpiece.
I want the whole cord to be replaceable. What's wrong with that?
post #95 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJGeorgeT
I want the whole cord to be replaceable. What's wrong with that?
It wasn't clear from your original post that you wanted to replace the whole cable or just the jack end.

I have to say that it is easy to remove the cable from the UEs but they are held firm in normal use.
post #96 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big D
It wasn't clear from your original post that you wanted to replace the whole cable or just the jack end.

I have to say that it is easy to remove the cable from the UEs but they are held firm in normal use.
what part in 'replaceable cable/cord' don't you understand?
post #97 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJGeorgeT
what part in 'replaceable cable/cord' don't you understand?
Don't get upset. They were only trying to understand you fully before giving you the wrong answer...
post #98 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJGeorgeT
I want the whole cord to be replaceable. What's wrong with that?

Have you bothered to ask Sensa if they will replace a faulty cord at their expense? Ask them before you get worked up
post #99 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by gorman
There is some difference. Note how the UE-10 never go below -5db between 8KHz and 16KHz, while the UE-5c do.Keep us informed.
I spoke with Jerry this morning. I just got off the phone as a matter of fact. To summarize what we discussed on the phone:

1. The high frequency driver used in the UE-5C and 10 Pro is the exact same one. Same part number, same catalog number. They both provide extended frequency response to 16kHz with no EQing. They are both tuned to provide the same amount of detail to the music.

2. The UE-5C and UE-10 Pro use different low frequency drivers. The low frequency driver on the UE-5C provides a more modern bass signature of sound while the UE-10 Pro's low frequency driver provides a more natural and neutral sounding bass. Compared to the ER4, the UE-10 Pro adds about 4-5dB@100Hz of low frequency gain.

3. The primary difference between the UE-5C and the UE-5 Pro is the presence of a notch filter in the UE-5C, which is used to remove the mid frequency hump in the UE-5 Pro. At the request of UE, this notch filter can be removed from the UE-5C to make it sound like the UE-5 Pro. However, Jerry does not make the full soft option available for the UE-5C in the standard product offering. One of the things we discussed extensively is that a lot of ER4 listeners moving to UE-5C find that this lack of mid frequency hump is unacceptable. Such a lack of 'sweet' mids might be the reason why some feel that the UE-5C sounds muddy while in fact it does not. The ER4 has mid freq hump of about 5 to 7dB. He recommended that the notch filter be taken out if I decided to go with the UE-5C since I am an ER4 user.

4. The UE-10 Pro is significantly more expensive that the UE-5C because it provides 8 dB of additional headroom @ 100Hz. Because of this additional headroom, distortion is much lower in the UE-10 Pro. This additional headroom really shines when monitoring live drums. The UE-10 Pro does not use a notch filter. Instead, the crossover point is set much higher than that of the UE-5C and the dual lows and single high is mixed, creating that mild 2-4kHz mid frequency hump. Jerry's opinion of the 10 Pro's sound is that it is more accurate, whatever that means....and that for a ety head like myself this would be a better choice than the stock UE-5C.

5. The full soft material used by UE is actually a silicon-based material which hardens/cures by exposure to ultraviolet light.

6. Jerry prefers the hard material. One of the things he mentioned is that in all the years servicing his IEMs, he has noticed that there are more of the soft IEM than the hard ones he has had to repair. He explained that the hard material provides more protection to the electronic components.

7. I am glad to say that UE will charge only $10 to $20 to adjust my earpieces if 10 years down the road my ear canal changes shape and the earpieces need to be retouched.
post #100 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsferrari
Have you bothered to ask Sensa if they will replace a faulty cord at their expense? Ask them before you get worked up
It just seems to me that on the road, you can actually take a spare cord with you if you have an UE IEM. That's an advantage right there.
post #101 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJGeorgeT
I spoke with Jerry this morning. I just got off the phone as a matter of fact. To summarize what we discussed on the phone:

1. The high frequency driver used in the UE-5C and 10 Pro is the exact same one. Same part number, same catalog number. They both provide extended frequency response to 16kHz with no EQing. They are both tuned to provide the same amount of detail to the music.

2. The UE-5C and UE-10 Pro use different low frequency drivers. The low frequency driver on the UE-5C provides a more modern bass signature of sound while the UE-10 Pro's low frequency driver provides a more natural and neutral sounding bass. Compared to the ER4, the UE-10 Pro adds about 4-5dB@100Hz of low frequency gain.

3. The primary difference between the UE-5C and the UE-5 Pro is the presence of a notch filter in the UE-5C, which is used to remove the mid frequency hump in the UE-5 Pro. At the request of UE, this notch filter can be removed from the UE-5C to make it sound like the UE-5 Pro. However, Jerry does not make the full soft option available for the UE-5C in the standard product offering. One of the things we discussed extensively is that a lot of ER4 listeners moving to UE-5C find that this lack of mid frequency hump is unacceptable. Such a lack of 'sweet' mids might be why some feel the UE-5C sounds muddy while in fact it does not. The ER4 has mid freq hump of about 7 to 10dB. He recommended that the notch filter be taken out if I decided to go with the UE-5C since I am an ER4 user.

4. The UE-10 Pro is significantly more expensive that the UE-5C because it provides 8dB additional headroom at 100Hz. Because of this additional headroom, distortion is much lower in the UE-10 Pro. This additional headroom really shines when monitoring live drums. The UE-10 Pro does not use a notch filter. Instead, the crossover point is set much higher than that of the UE-5C and the dual lows and single high is mixed, creating that mild 2-3kHz mid frequency hump. Jerry's opinion of the 10 Pro is that it is more accurate, whatever that means....and that for a ety head like myself this would be a better choice than the stock UE-5C.

5. The full soft material used by UE is actually a silicon-based material which hardens by using ultraviolet light.

6. Jerry prefers the hard material. One of the things he mentioned is that in all the years servicing his IEMs, he has noticed that there are more of the soft IEM than the hard ones he has had to repair. He explained that the hard material provides more protection to the electronic components.

7. I am glad to say that UE will charge only $10 to $20 to adjust my earpieces if 10 years down the road my ear canal changes shape and the earpieces need to be retouched.
Thanks that expands my knowledge of the issues but i am still not sure what is best for me (UE-5C or UE-10). I would be using the UE with an Ipod most often with a Portable amp (Superdual). I listen mainly to rock music. I have been using a Shure E5 for the last 9 months so that is where i am coming from. The UE website suggest that either would be OK with the Ipod.
post #102 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJGeorgeT
1. The high frequency driver used in the UE-5C and 10 Pro is the exact same one. Same part number, same catalog number. They both provide extended frequency response to 16kHz with no EQing. They are both tuned to provide the same amount of detail to the music.
They need to update their website, then! And this still does not explain the difference in the frequency response chart (that is there, you can check what I stated). Anyway, I'm listening now to them and... wouldn't want anything else in my ears!
post #103 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJGeorgeT
5. The full soft material used by UE is actually a silicon-based material which hardens by using ultraviolet light.
Interesting news. So it's not acrylic, after all...
post #104 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by gorman
They need to update their website, then! And this still does not explain the difference in the frequency response chart (that is there, you can check what I stated). Anyway, I'm listening now to them and... wouldn't want anything else in my ears!
No two transducers (receivers, drivers) are ever the same even if they have the same catalog number. This is why many manufacturers like etymotics will do a frequency response check for the left and right ear and pair the ones with the closest frequency response.
post #105 of 271
Quote:
Originally Posted by DJGeorgeT
No two transducers (receivers, drivers) are ever the same even if they have the same catalog number. This is why many manufacturers like etymotics will do a frequency response check for the left and right ear and pair the ones with the closest frequency response.
I stand lectured. Thanks for making me a little bit more headphone-savy.
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