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"TANGERINE DREAM" Who are they? &; what influence have they had in Electronic music?

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 
From time to time; Electronic Music is mentioned here. Many consider Edgar Froese responsible for really getting it started when he formed his group; TANGERINE DREAM. It's quite a story, and it goes back to the mid 60s. Although; in the beginning, there was no percussion perse, later it evolved, and now with over 100 albums (including countless soundtracks), TD is still going strong. Their use of synthesizers is unheralded.

Some of their music is so laid back, it really is meditational. But some; is incredibly upbeat, and fantastic for motoring, or just plain Cranking Up!

Some of my favorite 'newer' releases are...

Melrose
Goblin's Club
Lily on the Beach
Rockoon
Tyranny of Beauty
Turn of the Tides
220 Volt Live


Here's more >>>>

http://www.tangerinedream.org/mod.p...1004&page_id=11

http://www.tangerinedream.org/mod.p...nu=11&page_id=4
post #2 of 30
Is this thread intended to be a question or a statement?... I can't really tell.

Either way, I do agree that Froese & crew were extremely influential in the formation of electronic music. I don't know if they can be credited with "creating" it (if any one band can singlehandedly be credited that, 'twould probably be Kraftwerk) but they were certainly very important. Tangerine Dream themselves traced their roots from the minimalist and avant-garde music movements of the '50s and '60s.

Their newer stuff has been pretty much new-age junk, in my opinion. To me, their early period is their best.

Klaus Schulze and his Moog synthesizers especially have had a great effect on modern electronic music: see Pete Namlook, owner, operator, and recording artist for Fax Records, probably the biggest "ambient" music label in the world. See his "Dark Side of the Moog" (great title...) collaborations with Schulze for modern-day Tangerine worship.

Their German Krautrock contemporaries (Can, Faust, Neu!, Kluster, Cluster, Popol Vuh, Amon Düül II, etc.) were also critical progenitors of the electronic music movement.

- Chris
post #3 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by minya
Is this thread intended to be a question or a statement?... I can't really tell.

Either way, I do agree that Froese & crew were extremely influential in the formation of electronic music. I don't know if they can be credited with "creating" it (if any one band can singlehandedly be credited that, 'twould probably be Kraftwerk) but they were certainly very important. Tangerine Dream themselves traced their roots from the minimalist and avant-garde music movements of the '50s and '60s.

Their newer stuff has been pretty much new-age junk, in my opinion. To me, their early period is their best.

Klaus Schulze and his Moog synthesizers especially have had a great effect on modern electronic music: see Pete Namlook, owner, operator, and recording artist for Fax Records, probably the biggest "ambient" music label in the world. See his "Dark Side of the Moog" (great title...) collaborations with Schulze for modern-day Tangerine worship.

Their German Krautrock contemporaries (Can, Faust, Neu!, Kluster, Cluster, Popol Vuh, Amon Düül II, etc.) were also critical progenitors of the electronic music movement.

- Chris
Hey Chris! It's meant more as a statement than anything. I dig TD. And yes; I agree; there is a lot of wasted material too, over the years. But; the good stuff is Great!
post #4 of 30
The true TD classics are "Phaedra" and "Rubycon;" they've got moments of sublime beauty as well as stuff that can really freak you out, particularly if you're in a significantly suggestive state.

I really like "Encore" as well; it was a 2-lp set when it came out, now it's on one CD. It's four 20-minute live pieces, each with great flow, pretty laid back and very beautiful.

I was fortunate to see TD in 1982 at Radio City Music Hall; Andy Summers, guitarist with The Police, was the opener. Just Andy and his guitars, pedals and some tape loops. Both performances were excellent.
post #5 of 30
Yes, obviously a highly influential group. Edgar's a pretty decent guitar player too. Wasn't his son featured on some of the early album covers & later became a group member?

My favourite tune is "The Journey" from "Sorcerer" only short but classic nevertheless. I know they toured the UK in the 1970's & played a lot of cathedrals, imagine the sound!
post #6 of 30
One of my favourite bands, ever. (I have a three-way tie for first, of which they are one.)

Yeah, they had a golden period -- starting right around Phaedra and drifting off somewhere around White Eagle and Hyperborea. L, my favourite albums (of theirs) are from this period: Force Majeure and Tangram. "Cloudburst Flight" is still single-worthy material, albeit a bit long.

But after listening to their more recent material, going back to their "silver" and "bronze" periods (my terms, not the popular terms -- I believe the popular terms are "pink" and "blue", but I have no idea what that means) weren't too bad, neither. Listen to tracks like "Alchemy of the Heart" from Tyger and you can see that they haven't yet lost it during their stint with Zomba/Jive Electro. (I also enjoyed Le Parc and Underwater Sunlight.)

But even later, during the Private Music period, they accomplished some absolute gems. See if you can spot the traditional melody in "Marakesh" from Optical Race; admire the Glassian minimalism of Miracle Mile.

Sure, starting about Rockoon, they really started to deteriorate -- introducing a way-too-busy "rock" mix to the proceedings -- but that's only compared with their earlier glories. Compared to most contemporary smooth neo-jazz pap, they still are better than most crap on the radio.
post #7 of 30
My first experience with TD was after the movie "Sorceror". I wanted to find out who did the soundtrack. Turns out, after auditioning some of their material, I was like "hey, I've heard that before!" My guess is that alot of folks have been exposed to TD, but don't know it.
post #8 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Budley007
My first experience with TD was after the movie "Sorceror". I wanted to find out who did the soundtrack. Turns out, after auditioning some of their material, I was like "hey, I've heard that before!" My guess is that alot of folks have been exposed to TD, but don't know it.

"Sorcerer" was a fantastic Movie! It was a remake of the foreign film "The Wages of Fear" (1954) with Yves Montand. It's still comes on occasionally. It's sub-titled. "Sorcerer" was TD's first soundtrack, too!

William Freidkin (the director of "Sorcerer"), said; had he known of TD when he directed "The Exorcist", he would have asked them to do the soundtrack to that movie.

What was really amazing is; they wrote the entire score to "Sorcerer" by only reading the screenplay! Apparently; no film clips were involved.

I will never forget when I first heard "Phaedra" (1974 or 1975). The Rolling Stone ad for the album called it 'music that melts'. Nothing quite like it. I was hooked. I had already been listening to ELP, so I loved synthesizers already. But; TD was truly unique.

Kraftwerk offered "Autobahn", and lots of my buddys and I got into it. But really' not too much else of theirs, I really remember. Although; I do remember "Trans Europe Express", a little.

I have never seen TD in concert, but I have always wanted to. It seems; they always played cities like L.A. or N.Y. Places, I never were, at the time.

Most of the music of TD's that I have now; are more later releases. I have Rubycon, Force Majeure, and Stratosfear on LP; along with a few others.
post #9 of 30
Awesome group! I was at a "happening" many moons ago and the hippies were spacing out to Rubycon..... beam me up scotty.

I love Zeit...... Birth of liquid plejades is great! I also have Rubycon, Phaedra, encore, Green desert, sorcerer, stratosfear, tangram and lily on the beach.

They've produced something like 200 albums so it's really hard to keep track of them and would be very expensive to buy all of their work!! http://perso.club-internet.fr/pfello...albumlist.html

Superb band :-)
post #10 of 30
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkFloyd
Awesome group! I was at a "happening" many moons ago and the hippies were spacing out to Rubycon..... beam me up scotty.

I love Zeit...... Birth of liquid plejades is great! I also have Rubycon, Phaedra, encore, Green desert, sorcerer, stratosfear, tangram and lily on the beach.

They've produced something like 200 albums so it's really hard to keep track of them and would be very expensive to buy all of their work!! http://perso.club-internet.fr/pfello...albumlist.html

Superb band :-)
good post.....good link!
post #11 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave-the-rave
The true TD classics are "Phaedra" and "Rubycon;" they've got moments of sublime beauty as well as stuff that can really freak you out, particularly if you're in a significantly suggestive state.
Gee, you bring me back some 30 years ago...

These two albums plus "Stratosfear" and "Force Majeure" - I still have them in vinyl... Haven't listened to them for a long time but they were great then - though I didn't care much for their change of style to the newer stuff...
post #12 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by minya
Klaus Schulze and his Moog synthesizers especially have had a great effect on modern electronic music: see Pete Namlook, owner, operator, and recording artist for Fax Records, probably the biggest "ambient" music label in the world. See his "Dark Side of the Moog" (great title...) collaborations with Schulze for modern-day Tangerine worship.
- Chris
Hi Chris,

Good suggestions.
One of the few realy good compilations: The Evolution of the Dark Side of the Moon (Pete Namlook & Klaus Schulze) AW 023.

Amicalement
post #13 of 30
anyone remember Terry Riley and his Rainbow in curved air? He used to play all night raves back in the 60's so he could be classed pretty influentual too?

have a listen here: http://www.groove.nl/cd/2/21140.html
post #14 of 30
"Poland" the title (15-20 minute?) track off their live album "Poland: The Warsaw Concert is a magnificent piece of work. Hear it at all costs! It's kind of TD in a nutshell, amazing track!
post #15 of 30

.

Kraftwerks "ralf und florian" album was also very influential. recorded in the 70's, it's more experimental then electronica, but you can detect obvious similarities between "ralf und florian" and anything by the orb or orbital. I highly highly recommend this album.
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