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Review: Sennheiser IE 800 earphones - Page 3

post #31 of 44

I like using IEMs while walking, making cable microphonic characteristics critical to my enjoyment of an IEM.  I wear glasses, so any behind ear cable that isn't the most supple generates scads of microphonic noise.  Memory wire cables accentuate microphonics when glasses are worn, with some worse than others.  I clip the memory wires under my glass temples to reduce clacking, but it's an imperfect solution.   Cables that work great for me are the non-memory twisted wire Westones and EarSonics.  Also, low modulus insulator cables such as those on the UE700 and X10s (X10s worse than UE700).  My IE8 cables are okay, though the texturing on the cable relief generates tons of wind turbulence while outside.  The Shure e500 and SE530 cables, though non-memory wire, were are the limit of what I consider acceptable from microphonics.  The Shure SE215s with memory wire are beyond that limit.  The stock SE846 cables are so microphonic during movement that there's just no point using them unless it's for a sit down session.  Oddly, the Triple.Fi 10 memory wire cables work okay.

 

The worst ever cables were the Klipsch C3s.

 

I wish each IEM offered a twisted wire no memory wire option, especially those with removable cables.  Needless to say, I'll be getting a non-memory wire cable for my SE846 soon.

post #32 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by IpodHappy View Post

I like using IEMs while walking, making cable microphonic characteristics critical to my enjoyment of an IEM.  I wear glasses, so any behind ear cable that isn't the most supple generates scads of microphonic noise.  Memory wire cables accentuate microphonics when glasses are worn, with some worse than others.  I clip the memory wires under my glass temples to reduce clacking, but it's an imperfect solution.   Cables that work great for me are the non-memory twisted wire Westones and EarSonics.  Also, low modulus insulator cables such as those on the UE700 and X10s (X10s worse than UE700).  My IE8 cables are okay, though the texturing on the cable relief generates tons of wind turbulence while outside.  The Shure e500 and SE530 cables, though non-memory wire, were are the limit of what I consider acceptable from microphonics.  The Shure SE215s with memory wire are beyond that limit.  The stock SE846 cables are so microphonic during movement that there's just no point using them unless it's for a sit down session.  Oddly, the Triple.Fi 10 memory wire cables work okay.

The worst ever cables were the Klipsch C3s.

I wish each IEM offered a twisted wire no memory wire option, especially those with removable cables.  Needless to say, I'll be getting a non-memory wire cable for my SE846 soon.

Yeah wearing glasses sometimes interferes with IEM's that use around-the-ear cable systems. My glasses don't interfere too much as long as I keep the cable below the frame, so that it rests on top of the cable. Those extra "sleeves" over the ear can be removed for SE535/SE846 tho, not sure if that would help...
post #33 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by IpodHappy View Post
 

I like using IEMs while walking, making cable microphonic characteristics critical to my enjoyment of an IEM.  I wear glasses, so any behind ear cable that isn't the most supple generates scads of microphonic noise.  Memory wire cables accentuate microphonics when glasses are worn, with some worse than others.  I clip the memory wires under my glass temples to reduce clacking, but it's an imperfect solution.   Cables that work great for me are the non-memory twisted wire Westones and EarSonics.  Also, low modulus insulator cables such as those on the UE700 and X10s (X10s worse than UE700).  My IE8 cables are okay, though the texturing on the cable relief generates tons of wind turbulence while outside.  The Shure e500 and SE530 cables, though non-memory wire, were are the limit of what I consider acceptable from microphonics.  The Shure SE215s with memory wire are beyond that limit.  The stock SE846 cables are so microphonic during movement that there's just no point using them unless it's for a sit down session.  Oddly, the Triple.Fi 10 memory wire cables work okay.

 

The worst ever cables were the Klipsch C3s.

 

I wish each IEM offered a twisted wire no memory wire option, especially those with removable cables.  Needless to say, I'll be getting a non-memory wire cable for my SE846 soon.


Maybe it's just semantics but I don't think "clacking on your glasses" is the thing most people think about when talking microphonics - usually it's any cable movement (even lightly) over clothing - although the glasses thing is annoying - As before- I also wear glasses and I still don't have any microphonics issues with stock 846 cables although if the glasses move around, it can loosen the seal sometimes. I make sure the memory wire is firmly curved around my ear and put my glasses over the top. Could depend on the weight of your glasses and size of the arms, etc. One thing you can get from some iem's is footfall causing bone conduction which is different than cable microphonics. I find this occurs more often with iem's with the best isolation


Edited by hockey_magnet - 8/30/14 at 12:12pm
post #34 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by IpodHappy View Post
 

I like using IEMs while walking, making cable microphonic characteristics critical to my enjoyment of an IEM.  I wear glasses, so any behind ear cable that isn't the most supple generates scads of microphonic noise.  Memory wire cables accentuate microphonics when glasses are worn, with some worse than others.  I clip the memory wires under my glass temples to reduce clacking, but it's an imperfect solution.   Cables that work great for me are the non-memory twisted wire Westones and EarSonics.  Also, low modulus insulator cables such as those on the UE700 and X10s (X10s worse than UE700).  My IE8 cables are okay, though the texturing on the cable relief generates tons of wind turbulence while outside.  The Shure e500 and SE530 cables, though non-memory wire, were are the limit of what I consider acceptable from microphonics.  The Shure SE215s with memory wire are beyond that limit.  The stock SE846 cables are so microphonic during movement that there's just no point using them unless it's for a sit down session.  Oddly, the Triple.Fi 10 memory wire cables work okay.

 

The worst ever cables were the Klipsch C3s.

 

I wish each IEM offered a twisted wire no memory wire option, especially those with removable cables.  Needless to say, I'll be getting a non-memory wire cable for my SE846 soon.

 

Why don't you try removing the memory wire from the 846 cable? - it's a pretty simple process

post #35 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by hockey_magnet View Post


Maybe it's just semantics but I don't think "clacking on your glasses" is the thing most people think about when talking microphonics - As before- I also wear glasses and I still don't have any microphonics issues with stock 846 cables although if the glasses move around, it can loosen the seal sometimes. One thing you can get from some iem's is footfall causing bone conduction which is different than cable microphonics. I find this occurs more often with iem's with the best isolation

Yeah, but you'll get that even if you remove the cable on SE535/SE846. Can hardly call that cable-microphonics.
Or ofc, if you yank hard on the cable, but again, not what I would call cable microphonics.
post #36 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by CybDev View Post


Yeah, but you'll get that even if you remove the cable on SE535/SE846. Can hardly call that cable-microphonics.
Or ofc, if you yank hard on the cable, but again, not what I would call cable microphonics.

I agree

post #37 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Y View Post
 

I wish to get an iem for my AK240 soon and would you say the ie800 will do fine with the AK240s?

Mine sound great out of my AK120. I wouldn't worry about balanced.

 

To those with microphonics issues, I agree totally, but I have found a shirt clip helps a lot. Mind you I only use mine at my desk at work which means I'm still when wearing them. If i was moving around and wanting to wear IEMs, i wouldn't get these. My B&W C5s are great for walking around with their in ear cable loop.

 

To the original poster, where did you get the 16ohm spec from? There seems to be conflicting information out there. Some say 16, others say 22.


Edited by tate6969 - 9/6/14 at 5:33am
post #38 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by tate6969 View Post

Mine sound great out of my AK120. I wouldn't worry about balanced.

To those with microphonics issues, I agree totally, but I have found a shirt clip helps a lot. Mind you I only use mine at my desk at work which means I'm still when wearing them. If i was moving around and wanting to wear IEMs, i wouldn't get these. My B&W C5s are great for walking around with their in ear cable loop.

To the original poster, where did you get the 16ohm spec from? There seems to be conflicting information out there. Some say 16, others say 22.
The Sennheiser website says Impedance 16 Ohms
post #39 of 44

Thanks for your good review.I liked it.

 

Did you ask to Axell Grell ''will upper model release after IE800'' ?

post #40 of 44

Sigh... wouldn't you know, I finally snag a good deal on IE800s, and between ordering and receiving them I get too much of a head cold to hear anything properly! Oh well, at least it meant I was actually home to sign for them. Lovely little things, looking forward to giving them a proper listen when my head clears up...

post #41 of 44

Well, yesterday my ears felt like they were at least operating at 95%, so I gave the IE800s a nice listen during my commute home. This is really the only time I use IEMs: a 1.5 hour train ride, during which I will almost certainly fall asleep. I've been using RE-600s, but no matter what tips I use, I have trouble with maintaining a seal, maintaining proper angle, maintaining... everything to keep the sound quality up to its standards as well as consistent between the two channels. I think the angled nozzle approach works better with my ears - I had no fidgeting, no popping out, no trouble whatsoever, fit/comfort/ergonomics are spot on for me.

 

The sound... is spectacular. Very immersive, tall... I can see why people say these are the closest thing to full-size headphones. I felt like vocals were a bit recessed, but so far that's the only thing about them that might take some getting used to - and it may have been due to my head still being a bit stuffy. All in all, these sound phenomenal. Listened to the Turovskys' take on Pärt's Tabula Rasa; the second and third movement of Gershon's recording of Glass's Itaipu, and the opening to Glassworks while I was browsing Glass; Skempton's Lento as performed by the BBC SO under Wigglesworth. Everything just sounded so... full. All pieces that (to me, at least) are incredibly moving, and with the IE800s, I was fully immersed, and as deeply moved as I could be by the music. Nothing really seemed lacking - again, save for vocals. In Itaipu, this was rather a non-issue, but listening to Tormis's Kust Tunnen Kodu as performed by Gerretz-Traksmann, Härma, and Ratt, I just felt I was getting a bit more piano than voice, which is really not the goal of this piece. 

 

I have a lot more listening to do. But these are spectacular IEMs. Time to dump the RE-600s, I think...

post #42 of 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by brhfl View Post
 

Well, yesterday my ears felt like they were at least operating at 95%, so I gave the IE800s a nice listen during my commute home. This is really the only time I use IEMs: a 1.5 hour train ride, during which I will almost certainly fall asleep. I've been using RE-600s, but no matter what tips I use, I have trouble with maintaining a seal, maintaining proper angle, maintaining... everything to keep the sound quality up to its standards as well as consistent between the two channels. I think the angled nozzle approach works better with my ears - I had no fidgeting, no popping out, no trouble whatsoever, fit/comfort/ergonomics are spot on for me.

 

The sound... is spectacular. Very immersive, tall... I can see why people say these are the closest thing to full-size headphones. I felt like vocals were a bit recessed, but so far that's the only thing about them that might take some getting used to - and it may have been due to my head still being a bit stuffy. All in all, these sound phenomenal. Listened to the Turovskys' take on Pärt's Tabula Rasa; the second and third movement of Gershon's recording of Glass's Itaipu, and the opening to Glassworks while I was browsing Glass; Skempton's Lento as performed by the BBC SO under Wigglesworth. Everything just sounded so... full. All pieces that (to me, at least) are incredibly moving, and with the IE800s, I was fully immersed, and as deeply moved as I could be by the music. Nothing really seemed lacking - again, save for vocals. In Itaipu, this was rather a non-issue, but listening to Tormis's Kust Tunnen Kodu as performed by Gerretz-Traksmann, Härma, and Ratt, I just felt I was getting a bit more piano than voice, which is really not the goal of this piece. 

 

I have a lot more listening to do. But these are spectacular IEMs. Time to dump the RE-600s, I think...

What were you using to drive the IE800s? I'm sure IE800 is superior but they're not closed iems like RE-600s so I would keep them lol.

post #43 of 44
I have no need/use/burning desire for closed, so… I doubt I will. They sound good but just don't work well for me. And the IE800s sound much better. Source is just an iPhone 5. Not adding anything else to the mix.


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post #44 of 44

Compared to Klipsch x10`s the microphonics are barely noticeable but compared to silent over-ear models it can get obtrusive, a shirt clip and a shallower fit will prevent this, really anything that stops the cable from touching your face. Sennheiser should have made the cable longer above the y-split and removed the stupid 2.5mm plug which is the main reason the iem`s keep falling out of people`s ears. Luckily over-ear works well for me but they don`t sound the same and it destroys the soundstage. Apart from that amazing sound and uncanny resistance to hiss/distortion, makes it worth it, they were an absolute bargain at $550 aud new!, I would take them over any high end westone, shure or phonak model any day.

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