Head-Fi.org › Forums › Help and Getting Started › Introductions, Help and Recommendations › Is hi-fi headphones not worth it if I dislike treble?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is hi-fi headphones not worth it if I dislike treble? - Page 2

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by coconutghost View Post
 

Wow Audeze headphones are expensive.. are they made of diamond or something lolol? I think I'll rather buy a new computer with that XD ... Or maybe my opinion will change if my ears become more adapted to hifi

 

Like all you said, my friend said hd650 will fit me better since I didn't like emphasized treble so I'm going to try that

 

Thanks for the help!

 

No, but these are:

 

 

People who purchase four-figure headphones generally feel that they are worth the trouble (if not worth the price) due to the sound quality benefits.

 

If Audeze shocks you, then you probably don't want to know about the STAX SR-009 ($4,450) or Abyss AB-1266 ($5,495) ...woops, I just told you! :p

 

The HD 650 is a fine choice. It's actually the highest-rated over-ear headphone on Head-Fi.

post #17 of 25

I think the previous posts pretty much explained everything well already, but I just wanted to add that I began this hobby about 4ish years ago with some beyerdynamic dt990 32 ohm headphones, just playing straight off the computer, and that was it for 2 years, and it took that long to get the feeling they needed a bit more bass, ( because I am slightly treble sensitive too) so then I got denon d5000 headphones when they were at their lowest price, and still have those today, and even though some badly recorded songs can sound sibilant on them, for the most part they have that strong full hard hitting sound that I prefer over those brighter sounding headphones like the akg lineup. and this is still just plugged into a computer straight, no dac, no amp. Only recently did I get audeze lcd 2's and a decent schiit dac, and am now looking at an end game amp for the long run, but that is simply because I love music and I love diving into the music and swimming in the flow and detail that exists in a good recording of a genre I like. Once you live with a pair of headphones that can give you a taste of such a thing, you start the journey to hear more, eventually you'll break or your wallet will lol. There is a combination to create any sound you like, if you really wanted to be in the polar opposite direction from bright and treble high, then you can always go with a tube amp, and warm headphones, and only copper cables (nothing with silver, since that adds air and sometimes brightness, since it is a better conductor of electricity), and a warm dac instead of neutral, and avoid all music that has low mastering quality/bit rate since anything recorded well (doesnt have to be super fancy, most music besides the super mainstream stuff has a good version out there) won't really have sibilance in it, and you would have a hi-fi audio set up that would be anti-sibilance lol. Just don't forget to fine tune your sound preference as you hear better stuff, because sometimes your ears will tell you something different than what your mind thinks you like.

post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by saxelrod92 View Post
 

I think the previous posts pretty much explained everything well already, but I just wanted to add that I began this hobby about 4ish years ago with some beyerdynamic dt990 32 ohm headphones, just playing straight off the computer, and that was it for 2 years, and it took that long to get the feeling they needed a bit more bass, ( because I am slightly treble sensitive too) so then I got denon d5000 headphones when they were at their lowest price, and still have those today, and even though some badly recorded songs can sound sibilant on them, for the most part they have that strong full hard hitting sound that I prefer over those brighter sounding headphones like the akg lineup. and this is still just plugged into a computer straight, no dac, no amp. Only recently did I get audeze lcd 2's and a decent schiit dac, and am now looking at an end game amp for the long run, but that is simply because I love music and I love diving into the music and swimming in the flow and detail that exists in a good recording of a genre I like. Once you live with a pair of headphones that can give you a taste of such a thing, you start the journey to hear more, eventually you'll break or your wallet will lol. There is a combination to create any sound you like, if you really wanted to be in the polar opposite direction from bright and treble high, then you can always go with a tube amp, and warm headphones, and only copper cables (nothing with silver, since that adds air and sometimes brightness, since it is a better conductor of electricity), and a warm dac instead of neutral, and avoid all music that has low mastering quality/bit rate since anything recorded well (doesnt have to be super fancy, most music besides the super mainstream stuff has a good version out there) won't really have sibilance in it, and you would have a hi-fi audio set up that would be anti-sibilance lol. Just don't forget to fine tune your sound preference as you hear better stuff, because sometimes your ears will tell you something different than what your mind thinks you like.

 

Anti-sibilance - I like that!

 

The problem with avoiding sibilance on the recording side of the spectrum is that so many releases (including "fancy" ones) have poor production. (I won't go into a rant about that here, though.)

 

About combinations to create any sound you like - that's so true, but can be a little tricky, especially with so many possibilities, each piece in the puzzle further complicating things. For example, adding too many of those "anti-sibilant" components could end up muffling the sound. It's all about balance, and that requires experimentation.

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Music Alchemist View Post
 

 

Anti-sibilance - I like that!

 

The problem with avoiding sibilance on the recording side of the spectrum is that so many releases (including "fancy" ones) have poor production. (I won't go into a rant about that here, though.)

 

About combinations to create any sound you like - that's so true, but can be a little tricky, especially with so many possibilities, each piece in the puzzle further complicating things. For example, adding too many of those "anti-sibilant" components could end up muffling the sound. It's all about balance, and that requires experimentation.


yea exactly, thats why I mentioned at the end to make sure you fine tune your sound preferences as you hear more stuff, because what you originally thought you would like (as in super anti-sibilant) might turn out to be too much in one direction. thats why I like solid state for my lcd 2, and don't really mess with tubes, and the bifrost uber is generally a neutral dac, and I'll probably stick with that route. One thing I did learn in recent months though is the idea to enhance certain sound signatures instead of compensating for them. like a great commonly used example is people like to pair the audeze headphones with colder/brighter sounding amps/dacs in an attempt to compensate the overall end result. but what you find out after trial and error (or just plain old personal preference) is that complimenting the headphones sometimes works out much better overall and doesn't always give you an end result of being too one sided, in this case that darker tone. and in general to really have a good understanding of what all these terms mean to you. bright, dark, warm, harsh, etc might not always mean the same thing to you as they do for someone else, on the same piece of gear, so it's important to put what people say into perspective if you can't listen before buying.

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by coconutghost View Post

Like all you said, my friend said hd650 will fit me better since I didn't like emphasized treble so I'm going to try that

Doubtful that's going to work for you unless you thought the HD650 had just a little bit too much treble.
post #21 of 25
I think that's the point he's making. The rolled-off treble of the 650 will help. It helps me a lot.
post #22 of 25

seems like you want warm and smooth, like other have said id guess that the HD650 is what your after.

post #23 of 25
Thread Starter 

just wanted to update

 

Got my hd650 on Thursday and I am loving it :)

 

Amazing comfort and no sibilance (can wear them for hours).

 

The only thing I dislike is that now I can hear the singer's lips separating on some tracks and noise and etc in bad recordings :p

 

Again, thanks for the help everyone!

post #24 of 25
Congrats! And welcome to the world of hearing all the details biggrin.gif
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by coconutghost View Post

just wanted to update

Got my hd650 on Thursday and I am loving it smily_headphones1.gif

Amazing comfort and no sibilance (can wear them for hours).

The only thing I dislike is that now I can hear the singer's lips separating on some tracks and noise and etc in bad recordings tongue.gif

Again, thanks for the help everyone!

Congratulations! Now for an amp...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Help and Getting Started › Introductions, Help and Recommendations › Is hi-fi headphones not worth it if I dislike treble?