or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Home speaker setup

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Excuse me for my bad english pls !

So basically I have a pair of active speakers which are connected with RCA to a "source switch".

At the switch are my TV, PC and a bluetooth transmitter hooked up - all with 3.5mm > RCA  ( I could also connect them via RCA > RCA)

Im pretty sure that this isnt the ideal setup - so could you help me make it better ? 

Is it possible - or - does it make sense to get a DAC ? 

 

 

 

I added a link to a drawing to make even more clear!    (paint skills)

 

http://puu.sh/9Ayo8/418b312ceb.png

 

 

 

Thanks in advance  :)

post #2 of 18

It will depend on whether the DAC can take all those inputs, but a DAC being a Digital to Analogue Converter, I am not positive if you can find one that has an analog input from the BT transmitter; even if it has a headphone amp built in and analog inputs for that, it may not necessarily be routed out of its preamp output. If you really need the BT, then just check if your speakers have another set of analogue inputs, that way you can hook up the BT receiver to them that way while the HDTV and PC are connected to the DAC.

If so, or you can forego the BT, then next thing you should do is check if your HDTV has an SPDIF output, then check if your motherboard outputs a full 5v on all USB ports (just in case, since some DACs still need that much out of USB) or if it has SPDIF output. You must then choose a DAC that will work with both of them, since DACs usually have just one of each type of SPDIF input, which means that if both your motherboard and HDTV use toslink/optical, then you can't hook them up to the DAC, or at least you'll have to use USB, but make sure it's compatible. At this point the limitation will be that the DAC is only 2.0, so any surround sound programs that can pass from your digital cable or other video sources, and your PC, will not be decoded.

Honestly though the easiest way to integrate a TV and PC into one sound system is to just scrap the active speakers and set it up as a home theater. A modern HD receiver would have an HDMI1.4b system where the HDMI will not only carry digital audio, but also have a return channel on the same cable. So the set-up will be (pay attention to the arrows):

 

PC GPU >>HDMI*>> HT receiver <Audio return channel/Video>HDMI>Video> HDTV <<HDMI*<< Digital cable receiver

................L> 5.1 speakers + sub

 

Done this way you can play games on the huge screen, and audio goes out all around you.

 


*Audio+Video

post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

PC & TV do indeed have a SPDIF output but how will I be able to switch between the different sources then ?

Is there even a DAC with 2 SPDIF inputs ?

And yes - the speakers also have a  6.3mm input -so should i connect that to BT transmitter with 6.3mm to RCA or to 3.5mm?
 

post #4 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post
 

PC & TV do indeed have a SPDIF output but how will I be able to switch between the different sources then ?

Is there even a DAC with 2 SPDIF inputs ?

 

There are LOTS of DACs with two SPDIF inputs, with a switch out front that lets you choose which on to use. The question is whether your PC and TV have the same kind of SPDIF output, because even if a DAC has two or more SPDIF inputs, it will have only one of each type of SPDIF input. If for example your DAC has no USB to accommodate the PC, or if there's a reason why you don't want to or can't use USB (like if high-res or DSD doesn't go through that particular DAC's USB input, or if your motherboard doesn't output the full 5v the DAC needs, you have to pay extra for the USB input, etc), and both your TV and motherboard have an optical/toslink SPDIF output, then where do you hook them up?

 

Look at the Schiit Bifrost - it has two SPDIF inputs, but one each coaxial and optical/toslink. USB input is $99 on top of the Bifrost.

And here's the front panel - not sure how the input selection works as that might be the power button, but it might be able to auto detect which one is active.

 

 

 

 

This is the AudioGD NFB-12, and it also has two SPDIF inputs - one each coaxial and optical/toslink. And also USB.

Heres' the front panel - that button on the left has three positions for selecting the input.

 

 

 

 

Here's the Burson Conductor, which has two SPDIF inputs - one each coaxial and toslink - plus USB, and two sets of analog inputs that go straight to its amp section.

Here's the front panel, with a button under the marked input LED indicators, each press cycling through each input.

 

 

 

Here's the Musical Fidelity M1DAC, which has four digital audio inputs - USB, AES/EBU (single XLR), coaxial, and optical/toslink

Here's the front panel, with a button that says, "input select," each press cycling through each input, the active one gets its red light lit up.

 

 

Here's the Meier Audio StageDAC, which has two coaxial inputs, one optical input, and one USB input - the left switch looks like it's a three-position type that autodetects between the USB and one of the coax inputs.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post

 

And yes - the speakers also have a  6.3mm input -so should i connect that to BT transmitter with 6.3mm to RCA or to 3.5mm?

 

Yes, if that's an input then you can use any 6.3mm to 3.5mm converter with the 3.5mm to 3.5mm from your BT receiver.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 6/19/14 at 8:26pm
post #5 of 18
What make/model active speakers do you have?
post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

What make/model active speakers do you have?

 

I have the Fostex PM05.d

post #7 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your recommendations !

But those DACs are all kinda expensive - would they noticeably change the sound ? 

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post
 

Thanks for your recommendations !

But those DACs are all kinda expensive - would they noticeably change the sound ? 

 

If what you are using now is that bad and you get one that's good, or what you're using now is flat (if a bit 2D, maybe) then you go for a more expensive one with deliberately colored sound, yeah you'll very likely notice that immediately. If you have a decent DAC now and then you get a slightly better DAC, most likely you won't hear any difference. Either way the DACs are only one variable, the other is the listener, who can be at or anywhere between two extremes of "tone deaf" or "delusional audiophool."

 

For your case however you obviously need the DAC upgrade for one more reason besides (an as of now debatable gains for you in terms of) SQ, which is basically to act as a receiver for all digital sources in your system. Note that all those DACs above are around $350 at least, so if you live in the right areas, a network A/V receiver would be a better choice. In N.America for example you can get one online or in stores for around $250 (if not less when there's a discount), which works well with your system since you'll be using HDMI for the HDTV and probably for the computer's graphics card (and you'll probably have enough HDMI inputs left to hook up an XBOne and a PS4 in the future), every source goes through it, if you get surround speakers then that receiver can decode most modern surround formats (usually you'd have to buy special ed BluRays to get some sound formats that won't work with all receivers, but they have several in each disk, so that's not really a problem), and if it's a network receiver you can hook it up to your router or at the very least it will have a USB port to access your NAS (so no need to cram HDDs inside the computer that will likely just block the front fans and slow down the intake air that should go to your CPU and GPU coolers with minimal heat picked up from the HDDs).

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post

Thanks for your recommendations !
But those DACs are all kinda expensive - would they noticeably change the sound ? 

Not significantly, IMO, to make it worthwhile spending more on a DAC than the value of your speakers. For the price of one of those DACs, you could get an audio video receiver, then sell your Fostex, and get some passive speakers. Some AVRs have networking capability to connect to some devices via wifi, plenty of inputs for other devices, and flexibility for future upgrades smily_headphones1.gif
post #10 of 18

What about http://www.amazon.com/Behringer-SRC2496-24-Bit-Sample-Converter/dp/B0002E50J0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1403377911&sr=8-1&keywords=behringer+src+2496 , it has coax and optical inputs and xlr ouputs so you can go balanced and use xlr to xlr cables with your monitors , I use this dac myself its great value for money.

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 

well - if I buy a amplifier for 300 bucks - I might aswell buy some new speakers (klipsch look sexy) ,and use my monitors only for my pc ? 
hm I also have the fear that I dont get "real" stereo sound: because my speakers  are 1,25 m (4 feet) away from each other and I sit about 2,5 meters (8.2 feet) away from my tv. 

post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post
 

well - if I buy a amplifier for 300 bucks - I might aswell buy some new speakers (klipsch look sexy) ,and use my monitors only for my pc ? 
hm I also have the fear that I dont get "real" stereo sound: because my speakers  are 1,25 m (4 feet) away from each other and I sit about 2,5 meters (8.2 feet) away from my tv. 

 

At that distance from the speakers that are that close to each other you won't appreciate nor even allow for enough width in the soundstage. Not that most set-ups can actually create the same size of soundstage as any conceivable stage in the recordings they own, but at 1.25m apart that's still around the territory of nearfield.

post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 

so I should use them at the pc ?
- and how how far should they be apart ?

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post
 

so I should use them at the pc ?

 

At 1m or a bit more apart, yes.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post


- and how how far should they be apart ?

 

As wide as your room will go without reflections on the back and side walls becoming a problem, then adjust the distance of your listening seat accordingly. Personally if you can't at least get your speakers out with at least 1.75m-ish between them and your chair roughly 1.75m or more from the center of those speakers, you might as well save the space and go with nearfield monitors. 


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 6/21/14 at 11:01pm
post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHummingbird View Post

well - if I buy a amplifier for 300 bucks - I might aswell buy some new speakers (klipsch look sexy) ,and use my monitors only for my pc ? 

hm I also have the fear that I dont get "real" stereo sound: because my speakers  are 1,25 m (4 feet away from each other and I sit about 2,5 meters (8.2 feet) away from my tv. 

Generally, the recommended setup is the speakers in an equilateral triangle with the listening position: same distance apart from each other as they are from you. Then toe them in toward the listening position.

But even with your setup, you are still getting stereo separation. You just won't get the larger soundstage and imaging benefits of a better distance setup. But it still can sound good. Only people with dedicated listening rooms and a lot of money can have a truly optimal setup in a room. The rest of us just make the best of the room/space that we have smily_headphones1.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home