or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Best setup for a trucker?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Best setup for a trucker?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
As the title mentions I am a truck driver. I drive over the road and I am home maybe once to twice a year. I need some suggestions for some headphones that sound great but are very durable and if possible have folding ear cups like on my sennheiser hd8 djs. Having wireless or bluetooth capabilities don't hurt either.

I currently have sennheiser hd8 djs and 428s and a set of sony mdrx10 my friend gave me. The only amp I have so far is a fiio e12. I usually play my music out of my Samsung note 2 with the gain mod while driving and use my laptop while I am in the bunk.

Budget wise is about 3k at the moment for a set up but if I find something that will be worthwhile I can save up more towards audio, currently I am only putting away about 2k a week for a car and house and giving myself about 500 a week to play with but I have been saving a bit of it for a bigger purchase.


Thanks in advance guys I have been lurking here for the last couple days and it seems like you guys are helpful
post #2 of 16
Thread Starter 
No suggestions at all?
post #3 of 16
Do you need isolation from outside noise?

What are your musical preferences?
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Sound quality mostly. I mostly listen to edm, rap, rock, techno, trance, classical, metal, dubstep, and power metal... and stuff like Lindsey sterling and nightwish. I would like to be able to hear my surroundings if possible and listen at a decent volume without disturbing my codriver. Bluetooth and wireless is a plus but not needed
post #5 of 16
Openness and leakage go together so I think you need to decide whether it's more important to be able to hear your surroundings or not disturb the other driver. It's also not completely clear to me where you'll be listening.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Well the folding ear cups on my hd8 dj allow me to hear out of one ear while driving. Most of my listening will be while driving but I also enjoy listening to music for an hour or so before sleeping. The bunk is about 3 ft behind the seats. Maybe a high quality bluetooth earbud would be better? I am not too sure what would be viable for my situation. The hd8 dj is great for a lot of my music but a little too bass heavy for some, even when I mess with my eq on my phone
post #7 of 16

Btd31, here are some headphones to consider, that should be durable and also fold flat or collapse. As you listen to a variety of genres, maybe these will be neutral enough.

 

Focal Spirit Professional

 

AKG K550/K551 or K545 (detachable cable and a bit bassier than the 550). The K550 is lean in the bass for some folks, but it is tight and has good extension.

 

Shure SRH840, SRH940 (not sure about the durability on these)

 

With your budget, there are quite a few headphones available, but most are not really designed for portable use, so they might not hold up as well, and they do not fold or collapse down for storage.

 

There are quite a few DJ-style headphones (like your Sennheiser HD8s) that would work for you, but I am not sure if they would be a sonic upgrade over what you already have.

 

The Yamaha PRO 500 sounds very good and collapses, but I am not sure about its durability (I just picked up a pair).

 

The V-Moda M-100 is very popular and is built very well, and probably is bassier than the others I listed. Not sure how well they would fare with classical.

 

A higher end model, the Oppo PM-1, is probably a good general purpose headphone, but it is semi-open, so it will leak out some sound.

post #8 of 16

I forgot to mention, welcome to Head-Fi! Also, not sure if you already did, but if you post your question in the Introductions, Help and Recommendations forum, you should get more responses there.

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
The oppo pm1 looks decent, might give those a shot. Would a fiio e12 be enough to drive them or would I also have to upgrade my amp?
post #10 of 16

The PM-1 is an efficient headphone, and doesn't need a powerful amp. Your E12 is plenty powerful for it. There is a less fancy version, the PM-2, which will be less expensive, but sound very similar, coming out in July.

 

If you're thinking about a new portable amp, there are tons of options. People may be able to make some recommendations over on the Oppo PM-1 thread. I suspect that other amps may allow you to hear some details and a more layered presentation with the PM-1, but that is just a guess on my part. You would be able to get an amp, or a combination DAC/amp. I'd recommend just trying out the headphone first, and get used to the sound, before looking into an amp. Just a few amp possibilities for you that I enjoy: Leckerton Audio UHA-6S MkII a(can be used as an amp or DAC/amp) and CEntrance HiFi M8 (DAC/amp), Just Audio AHA-120 (amp). ALO Audio has a wide variety of portable amps.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Btd31 View Post

Sound quality mostly. I mostly listen to edm, rap, rock, techno, trance, classical, metal, dubstep, and power metal... and stuff like Lindsey sterling and nightwish. I would like to be able to hear my surroundings if possible and listen at a decent volume without disturbing my codriver. Bluetooth and wireless is a plus but not needed

 

That's a wide variety of music...  Do you have any sound preferences as well (do you want a bassy phone vs a brighter one, etc.)?  In terms of isolation, I've never found any headphone that could allow me to hear my surroundings without leaking noise...  Well, actually, the only model that I've had do that was the MEElectronics Atlas (earpad design allows this).  Semi-open helps with this, but may not be as good as allowing you to hear your surroundings.  A fully open model will leak (it's inevitable), but will keep you fully aware of all of your surroundings.  I would not recommend an IEM as they isolate too much while earbuds tend to be not as strong sonically (though there are exceptions).  Some suggestions:

  1. NAD VISO HP50 - This is a closed back phone, so it does isolate, but is a very well-received model.  The sound signature is warm and lush, it's an easy headphone to listen to without any issues.  It doesn't require an amp to run properly either.  This comes in around 300 dollars.
  2. Bowers & Wilkins P7 - Another warm phone, the bass is a little more focused on the low/mid-bass in contrast to the HP50.  The mids and highs are a little more energetic, but also a little more refined as well.  These scale up very well with better amps.  The P7 is closed back as well.  This will set you back around 400... 
  3. AKG K545/K845BT - Another warm phone, good depth and big bass body.  Treble is similar to that of the P7, slightly less refined but a middle-ground between the P7 and HP50.  Again, another easy phone to listen to, but it's not as laid back as the HP50 is.  Having a BT model available may be a plus as well.  This is also closed back.  This will run you 250-350 dollars (depending on whether or not you get the BT model)
  4. Harman Kardon BT - This is a sound that had to grow on me...  It's a closer-to-neutral sound signature but also quite unforgiving, so you'll have to feed it good files (mastered well).  This model runs over BT which may prove to be an advantage.  The main downside of these is that the earpads aren't as thick (leads to discomfort after about 1-1.5 hours of use :/  They run around 250 dollars. 
  5. V-Moda M-100 - This is a v-shaped model, focuses on the lows and highs mainly, good for everything you listen to except classical.  Again, this is a closed back model (if I'm not mistaken, the vents are just for show).  Very well-received model, and should hold up to whatever you throw at it.  This will run you around 300 dollars.
  6. MEElectronics Atlas - This is another V-shaped model, sonically speaking, it's quite inferior to the majority of the other headphones, it's still offers quality that is respectable...  The reason why I suggest it is because it does exactly what you want it to do in terms of isolation and leak...  It leaks very little, but allows you to hear your surroundings almost as well as an open headphone (better than most semi-open-backs I've used).  It's an on-ear model though.  It'll run you about 100 dollars. 
  7. Oppo PM-1 - Another warmer, slightly aggressive phone when it comes to the midrange.  Should work for the majority of the genres you listen to.  This is a semi-open-back planar, exquisite feel and look as well, should hold up well overall.  The sound signature is similar to that of the AKG K845BT.  This can be driven from something like an iPhone, but will improve with a better amp (like anything else).  It's been said that they don't scale up as well as other planars (but will scale).  This makes them a good choice for a portable-like setup.  This is the most expensive of the bunch, it'll run you 1100.
  8. Oppo PM-2* - A sweet, mid-focused headphone.  They share the same driver as the PM-1, but do have a different signature.  Treble is a little stronger, but does roll off earlier.  Bass depth is OK, though not the best (it's bested by both of HiFiMan's new models as well as Oppo's top model).  Like the PM-1, it's semi-open-back and feels just as exquisite and should hold up well.  Materials are cheaper with this model (some of them), but still very high quality.  Like the PM-1, it can be driven from an iPhone alone...  I'd assume they scale similar to that of the PM-1.  They will also improve with a warmer source IMO.  This will run you about 700 bucks at release time.
  9. HiFiMan HE-400i* - Warm, bassy phone.  Has good thickness and is quite musical and easy to listen to.  Take the midrange of the PM-2 and the bass and treble of the PM-1 and you get the signature of the 400i.  This is a fully open phone though, so depending on how loud you listen, this may leak.  It won't isolate well either.  The 400i can be run directly from an iPod/iPhone, but scale up with better sources.  This cost around 500.
  10. HiFiMan HE-560 - Neutral sound signature that is nearly flat, though the edge is taken off of the upper midrange.  It's quite a musical phone, but also has a tendency to be less forgiving in nature, so if your source is good (song source that is), it'll treat you very well.  Like the 400i, this is a fully open phone.  This one costs around 900.  The 560 are made to be run with a portable amp (yours can drive them), they scale up well too.  I am able to run them to a good level with my iPhone, but I am a quiet listener.

 

The first 5 are the cheaper models (if you can call them that), the last 4 are planars.  Historically speaking, planars have never been recommended for on the go use due to their weight and low sensitivity.  Both Oppo and HiFiMan have worked to fix this issue and did a great job with it.  With that said, consider a few things when choosing one out:

  1. Signature...  Find a signature that you feel you'll enjoy.  Some signatures will correspond directly to a specific genre of music you listen to.  Signatures also color and flavor music differently, though a v-shaped signature may be weaker with classical, some may prefer that signature as it thickens up instruments and focuses on specific instruments better...  With that said, choose your preferred signature over something that fits your genres.
  2. Open-ness...  The more open a headphone is, the more it allows you to hear your surroundings, but the more it leaks as well.  Keep in mind that if you do listen at lower volumes, it may not be audible (or barely audible) to your neighbor...  If you're inside of a loud truck, it may not be at all.  The more closed, however, the less it leaks, but will isolate more.  There may be exceptions to this...  Keep in mind that different pads can also alter the way they isolate and sound.
  3. Price...  This doesn't seem to be an issue for you IMO. 

 

I would say that if money is no issue, the PM-1 may prove to be a very good selection for you, but it is pricey (in terms of of setup, it should fare quite well)...  It actually isolated quite well for me when I auditioned them...  The second in line recommendation would be the 400i.  Both hold a similar signature that are easier to listen to.  If you're looking for neutrality, then the signature of choice would be the 560.  If you want a v-shaped sound, the M-100 might suite you very well.  If you want to ditch the amp, I'd say use the NAD, AKG, V-Moda, or B&W.

 

One last note, the 400i and PM-2 are not fully finalized yet (denoted by the '*').  Their signatures, moreso the PM-2 can change with time.  I don't see the 400i changing personally, HiFiMan seems to be waiting on a smooth and completed release of the 560 before they officially start on the 400i final models.  The specs, drivers, sound, etc. of that model seem to be finalized though. 


Edited by tinyman392 - 6/23/14 at 9:45pm
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Btd31 View Post

The oppo pm1 looks decent, might give those a shot. Would a fiio e12 be enough to drive them or would I also have to upgrade my amp?

 

Your Note 2 can drive them...  The E12 definitely will be able to as well.  As with most planars, better DAC/AMP, better sound. 

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Looks like maybe I will have to get a couple headphones and switch them out depending on what I feel like listening to at the time. Most of my music is 320kbs mp3 or from pandora/Google play/youtube. I only have a 64gb sd card in my note and its mostly movies or pictures I have taken in my travels only about 10gb is reserved for music. Also would running a non portable amp off an inverter in a truck thats prone to under volting electronics effect sound quality very much? Feels like a stupid question but it my microwave runs weird on the inverter vs at home along with my coffee maker
post #14 of 16
I definitely would stick with a battery powered amp for your situation. If you can't provide clean reliable power, most likely a non portable amp will not work well.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Btd31 View Post

Looks like maybe I will have to get a couple headphones and switch them out depending on what I feel like listening to at the time. Most of my music is 320kbs mp3 or from pandora/Google play/youtube. I only have a 64gb sd card in my note and its mostly movies or pictures I have taken in my travels only about 10gb is reserved for music. Also would running a non portable amp off an inverter in a truck thats prone to under volting electronics effect sound quality very much? Feels like a stupid question but it my microwave runs weird on the inverter vs at home along with my coffee maker

 

When I referred to a good source (file/song), I wasn't referring to the file type or even it's "numerical" quality (320kbs, 256, etc.).  I was talking about something that isn't in your control really, how it's mastered.  That said, 320 kbs is more than enough, even 256 is fine.  I personally run my stuff with 256 aac.  I do not recommend using a non-portable amp, all of the suggestions above run fine with a portable amp. 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Best setup for a trucker?