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Need affordable amp/receiver for Polk Audio Monitor 30's

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I've got a pair of Polk Audio Monitor 30's collecting dust and I'd like to be able to use them.

 

I'm looking for an amp/receiver under 50$ that could power them well enough.

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post
 

I've got a pair of Polk Audio Monitor 30's collecting dust and I'd like to be able to use them.

 

I'm looking for an amp/receiver under 50$ that could power them well enough.

 

Thanks!

 

Check the website Parts Express.

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post
 

 

Check the website Parts Express.

I know Parts Express. I'm asking for advice, not to be told to go to a store.

post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 

Really? No one can tell me the wattage I need to run my Monitor 30's and/or can recommend a decent amp?

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PurpleAngel View Post
 

 

Check the website Parts Express.

I know Parts Express. I'm asking for advice, not to be told to go to a store.


1. This is a headphone forum, not a speaker forum.

2. When you get advice, a little effort is required on your part.

 

They're your speakers, you should know the wattage limits.  If not, a little googling results in a wattage range of 20 - 100W from an old listing on Crutchfield (Polk does not have wattages on their site for the Monitor 30).

 

Parts Express does have many cheap amplifiers.  However, you must determine whether you need just an amp, a pre-amp to go along with it, or a receiver.  Chances are, you're not going to find a receiver for less than $50 unless it's a used one on ebay.  T-amps are good choices, but only if you have a pre-amp to go along with it.  Most headphone amps can operate as pre-amps, so maybe you have one of those?

 

As maybe you can see, the answer is not simple or cut and dry.  It takes some effort on your part.

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post
 


1. This is a headphone forum, not a speaker forum.

2. When you get advice, a little effort is required on your part.

 

They're your speakers, you should know the wattage limits.  If not, a little googling results in a wattage range of 20 - 100W from an old listing on Crutchfield (Polk does not have wattages on their site for the Monitor 30).

 

Parts Express does have many cheap amplifiers.  However, you must determine whether you need just an amp, a pre-amp to go along with it, or a receiver.  Chances are, you're not going to find a receiver for less than $50 unless it's a used one on ebay.  T-amps are good choices, but only if you have a pre-amp to go along with it.  Most headphone amps can operate as pre-amps, so maybe you have one of those?

 

As maybe you can see, the answer is not simple or cut and dry.  It takes some effort on your part.

 

Effort yes, but until your explanation I had no idea what that effort entailed.

 

Two problems:

 

1.) What do you mean 20-100w? So anything in the middle goes..?

2.) I'm not sure what a pre-amp is, but why is it necessary?

 

I'd also like a recommendation or at least an example of what I'm supposed to be looking for.

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post
 


1. This is a headphone forum, not a speaker forum.

2. When you get advice, a little effort is required on your part.

 

They're your speakers, you should know the wattage limits.  If not, a little googling results in a wattage range of 20 - 100W from an old listing on Crutchfield (Polk does not have wattages on their site for the Monitor 30).

 

Parts Express does have many cheap amplifiers.  However, you must determine whether you need just an amp, a pre-amp to go along with it, or a receiver.  Chances are, you're not going to find a receiver for less than $50 unless it's a used one on ebay.  T-amps are good choices, but only if you have a pre-amp to go along with it.  Most headphone amps can operate as pre-amps, so maybe you have one of those?

 

As maybe you can see, the answer is not simple or cut and dry.  It takes some effort on your part.

 

Effort yes, but until your explanation I had no idea what that effort entailed.

 

Two problems:

 

1.) What do you mean 20-100w? So anything in the middle goes..?

2.) I'm not sure what a pre-amp is, but why is it necessary?

 

I'd also like a recommendation or at least an example of what I'm supposed to be looking for.


1. 20 watts to 100 watts.  That more or less means 20 watts is the minimum for the speakers to function properly with most music.  100 watts means that if you exceed that and have the volume turned up considerably, you're in danger of blowing the speakers.  However, you will find that more power is usually better power, as long as you realize the limits and don't rack the volume knob all the time.

2. No amp will take the signal directly from a CD player, tuner, tape deck or DVD player.  Those components adhere to the "line-level" standard for output, meaning a pre-amp is necessary before you connect to an amplifier.  In classic high-level audiophile systems, the pre-amp serves as the front end - with volume control, source switching, tone controls, etc.  The amplifier is a separate box that does nothing but amplify the signal from a preamp (line-level standard input) and powers the load, most typically speakers.

 

Receivers combine the functions of both in a seamless way.  Better receivers, however, allow you to separate the connection in back between pre-amp and amplifier within the receiver.

 

I'm not up on the current DAPs in terms of what they need.  I suppose an iPod's output can be input directly into a separate amplifier, but you probably need to be very careful where the volume is set on the iPod, or it will send the amp into clipping.  That can be dangerous to your speakers even if the power output is not up to that 100W limit.  Better to use a "line-out" feature and keep things in the component line-level standards.  That way, you know what you're buying and what it will do for your speakers.

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomb View Post
 


1. 20 watts to 100 watts.  That more or less means 20 watts is the minimum for the speakers to function properly with most music.  100 watts means that if you exceed that and have the volume turned up considerably, you're in danger of blowing the speakers.  However, you will find that more power is usually better power, as long as you realize the limits and don't rack the volume knob all the time.

2. No amp will take the signal directly from a CD player, tuner, tape deck or DVD player.  Those components adhere to the "line-level" standard for output, meaning a pre-amp is necessary before you connect to an amplifier.  In classic high-level audiophile systems, the pre-amp serves as the front end - with volume control, source switching, tone controls, etc.  The amplifier is a separate box that does nothing but amplify the signal from a preamp (line-level standard input) and powers the load, most typically speakers.

 

Receivers combine the functions of both in a seamless way.  Better receivers, however, allow you to separate the connection in back between pre-amp and amplifier within the receiver.

 

I'm not up on the current DAPs in terms of what they need.  I suppose an iPod's output can be input directly into a separate amplifier, but you probably need to be very careful where the volume is set on the iPod, or it will send the amp into clipping.  That can be dangerous to your speakers even if the power output is not up to that 100W limit.  Better to use a "line-out" feature and keep things in the component line-level standards.  That way, you know what you're buying and what it will do for your speakers.

But I'm connecting it to my sound card in my computer.. not a CD player. I don't even own one of those anymore.

 

Wouldn't the sound card (X-Fi Titanium PCIe) work as a pre-amp?

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post
 

But I'm connecting it to my sound card in my computer.. not a CD player. I don't even own one of those anymore.

 

Wouldn't the sound card (X-Fi Titanium PCIe) work as a pre-amp?

 

Yea, guess the Titanium could in a very basic way function as a pre-amp.

Connect a stereo amplifier to it "Front Speaker" output.

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