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Your opinion about Crossfeed ?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

Hi guys!

I would like to know your opinion about using crossfeed (hardware), does it really creates a more "natural" soundstage, do you use it regularly, what is the kind of music that benefits from it?...

I know that's many questions, sorry ... but I would like to decide if it can be good for me.

I've tried to use the search function but can't find much information about thoses crossfeed circuits available currently, so do you have some recommendations?

Thanks for your help

post #2 of 5

I have a Meier Corda Cantate.2 amplifier with a hardware crossfeed, and also I use an Android with NeutronMP player with a processor software that includes a crossfeed feature. I prefer the latter, not simply because it's software vs hardware, but because it has variable settings. If anything, that's just easier to implement in software than hardware.

 

I can't recall the settings of the Meier amp's, but on most recordings it works fine as it reduces the inherent trident-shaped soundstage on headphones (which is worse on some and not as bad on others). However, many recordings don't have it as bad on the HD600 as they do for example on Grados (and sometimes it makes the soundstage deep but unnaturally narrow, although the instrument placements are more precise), so half the time I just use MediaMonkey (which drains my battery less) as a player at home. When I do use NeutronMP with my reference system, my settings are at a 700hz low pass and 4db of X-feed. I use the same settings (plus EQ tweaks) with my IEMs on the go, as I no longer use a dedicated player (just a spare battery for my smartphone), and the improvements on my IEMs are a lot more noticeable and positive.

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post
 

I have a Meier Corda Cantate.2 amplifier with a hardware crossfeed, and also I use an Android with NeutronMP player with a processor software that includes a crossfeed feature. I prefer the latter, not simply because it's software vs hardware, but because it has variable settings. If anything, that's just easier to implement in software than hardware.

 

I can't recall the settings of the Meier amp's, but on most recordings it works fine as it reduces the inherent trident-shaped soundstage on headphones (which is worse on some and not as bad on others). However, many recordings don't have it as bad on the HD600 as they do for example on Grados (and sometimes it makes the soundstage deep but unnaturally narrow, although the instrument placements are more precise), so half the time I just use MediaMonkey (which drains my battery less) as a player at home. When I do use NeutronMP with my reference system, my settings are at a 700hz low pass and 4db of X-feed. I use the same settings (plus EQ tweaks) with my IEMs on the go, as I no longer use a dedicated player (just a spare battery for my smartphone), and the improvements on my IEMs are a lot more noticeable and positive.

Hi ProtegeManiac, thanks for sharing your own experience.

I'm not into software and computer based music, as I did'nt move yet from the era of physical CD... :o

So I would prefer a hardware solution for crossfeed.

I'm just curious now about why you prefer the software crossfeed, or what do you didn't like in the hardware crossfeed. I have read that Meier has designed one of the more natural crossfeed, but unfortunately I have not had the opportunity to try it yet...

post #4 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fatiim View Post
 

Hi ProtegeManiac, thanks for sharing your own experience.

I'm not into software and computer based music, as I did'nt move yet from the era of physical CD... :o

So I would prefer a hardware solution for crossfeed.

I'm just curious now about why you prefer the software crossfeed, or what do you didn't like in the hardware crossfeed. I have read that Meier has designed one of the more natural crossfeed, but unfortunately I have not had the opportunity to try it yet...

 

Like I said, it was not an issue of software or hardware being better per se, but only that software is easier to implement. Hardware crossfeed takes up space on the PCB, and so will any associated parts for variable settings, which is why in the newer Meier amps and DACs you have, what, three or four fixed settings, whereas in software it can be virtually any setting you want if properly coded into the software processor and can be handled by the DSP.

If you're into car audio here's a similar example. Back in the early to mid 90s we had to have a CD player, then that feeds into an external Crossover to split what goes into the tweeter, midwoofer, and subwoofer, then maybe an EQ box. When DSP chips came out, you can cram that same crossover and EQ into the CD receiver as it only takes one chip, along with a Time Alignment feature so you can program custom timing delays on the nearer speakers so everything arrive in sync. In other words, an Alpine deck with such a DSP chip can have more processing options than a cumbersome system that consists of an older Alpine CD or tape deck, Audiocontrol Crossover, and Audiocontrol EQ, each of which needs its own connection to the car battery on top of the amplifiers. 

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post
 

 

Like I said, it was not an issue of software or hardware being better per se, but only that software is easier to implement. Hardware crossfeed takes up space on the PCB, and so will any associated parts for variable settings, which is why in the newer Meier amps and DACs you have, what, three or four fixed settings, whereas in software it can be virtually any setting you want if properly coded into the software processor and can be handled by the DSP.

If you're into car audio here's a similar example. Back in the early to mid 90s we had to have a CD player, then that feeds into an external Crossover to split what goes into the tweeter, midwoofer, and subwoofer, then maybe an EQ box. When DSP chips came out, you can cram that same crossover and EQ into the CD receiver as it only takes one chip, along with a Time Alignment feature so you can program custom timing delays on the nearer speakers so everything arrive in sync. In other words, an Alpine deck with such a DSP chip can have more processing options than a cumbersome system that consists of an older Alpine CD or tape deck, Audiocontrol Crossover, and Audiocontrol EQ, each of which needs its own connection to the car battery on top of the amplifiers. 


Thank you for your explanation. :beerchug:

I'm sure sooner or later I will try software crossfeed too... but it's not an option for me now...

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