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How is "tube sound" even audible in modern headphone amps? - Page 25

post #361 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post
 

I bet that tube has a bigger sound stage than most other tubes. 

And more oomph for sure!

post #362 of 380
There's a lot more air too.......oh...no air in a vacuum....never mind, carry on.
Quote:
Originally Posted by headdict View Post

And more oomph for sure!
post #363 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

yo toobes is punk, less yo got the BIG MAMA JAMMA TOOB!

 

If I ever buy a portable tube headphone amp, it's got to have one or two of these!

post #364 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by headdict View Post

If I ever buy a portable tube headphone amp, it's got to have one or two of these!
What about balanced outputs? Surely you'll want that option.
post #365 of 380

can we use it to carry cheese? or must we keep it closed?

post #366 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanD View Post
 

But we all had fun. :blink:

 

Well thats all that matters. :tongue:

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post

No guys I would not troll to such an extent.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=w_qXhoI1o8I

 

You sir are indeed a master entertainer...I bow down to your greater hosting skills....:biggrin:

post #367 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by limpidglitch View Post
 


I only skimmed through the IEEE article, but there didn't seem to be an answer to the OP's question there. Part history lesson, part review of the current market and a smattering of truisms.
​I wouldn't expect them to publish anything helpful on the subject in the future, either, considering this is the kind of stuff they deal with these days.

 

The AES article is from 1972. The OP's question was specifically concerned with modern tube amplifiers that have distortion levels below the known levels of perceptibility.

 

That's what I was thinking, too.

post #368 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by elmoe View Post
 

 

So you came into this thread to do what exactly? Quote my post and start an argument not pertaining to the topic at hand? Without even bothering to actually read the article itself?

 

:rolleyes:


Since I'm joining this late, it's amusing. He probably came in with the same intentions that I did -- to learn something. Instead, we get the typical thread where anyone who might like tubes is not invited. It's said to keep non-controversial stuff out, but then lots/most of it is just taking a chance to bash those people before they join the thread. LOL. I still want to learn, even if it's something I may not agree with ... yet.

post #369 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post

I just think that recording a concert and actually replaying a grand musical event is still in it's infancy. Yes, we are able to get the emotion to a point packaged then replayed but it is far from sounding totally real. Just put on any live recording to hear that. 

 

Amen! I like the sound from my headphones, but then listen to something live and am instantly reminded how far we have to go.

post #370 of 380
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdManOfCT View Post
 

Since I'm joining this late, it's amusing. He probably came in with the same intentions that I did -- to learn something. Instead, we get the typical thread where anyone who might like tubes is not invited. It's said to keep non-controversial stuff out, but then lots/most of it is just taking a chance to bash those people before they join the thread. LOL. I still want to learn, even if it's something I may not agree with ... yet.

 

Sound science is not about what people "like". It's.. well.. about science. If I wanted to hear opinions, I would create this topic elsewhere. 

 

I'm sorry that it sounds like "tube people" are not welcomed here. This wasn't my intention.


Edited by madwolfa - 12/24/14 at 10:45am
post #371 of 380

I have no complaint about someone wanting to alter the sound to achieve a desired effect. But I want to be able to precisely control it and have it at the right point in the chain. Trying to find a specific sound by randomly swapping tube amps with varying degrees of less than accurate performance is WAY too frustrating and expensive. And using colored sources just means that you need a different signal processing compensation downstream for each source. It is a LOT easier to just keep everything clean and accurate up to the very last stage, and apply precisely calibrated signal processing as the last step using DSPs and EQ.


Edited by bigshot - 12/28/14 at 1:16pm
post #372 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

I have no complaint about someone wanting to alter the sound to achieve a desired effect. But I want to be able to precisely control it and have it at the right point in the chain. Trying to find a specific sound by randomly swapping tube amps with varying degrees of less than accurate performance is WAY too frustrating and expensive. And using colored sources just means that you need a different signal processing compensation downstream for each source. It is a LOT easier to just keep everything clean and accurate up to the very last stage, and apply precisely calibrated signal processing as the last step using DSPs and EQ.

I'd think that afficionados of tubes would require a DSP that generated even order harmonics in the manner of which tubes operate and have some tweakability. I've never seen such a beast except for electric guitars but that's for genereating gobs of distortion and soft clipping which is not what any of us would want for our intended use. Just to be a wiseguy, to be realistic the DSP would have to add a touch of noise. :D

post #373 of 380

I know there are DSPs that do that for pro gear. I'm sure it would be possible to set up a computer based system that would channel everything through a DSP like this one... https://www.fieldingdsp.com/reviver

post #374 of 380
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

I know there are DSPs that do that for pro gear. I'm sure it would be possible to set up a computer based system that would channel everything through a DSP like this one... https://www.fieldingdsp.com/reviver

That kind of software is usually used for Music production software like Cakewalk Sonar and the like that have specific software plugin interfaces. Not sure if one can get it to work with foobar, etc. I took a peek at that link and didn't spot which interfaces they support. But that does look like it might work if it can be turned down for audiophile use and not be aggresive, If one is using an Android, iDevice or other DAP then all bets are off.

Edit: I just spotted they mentioned VST compatability.


Edited by StanD - 12/28/14 at 1:38pm
post #375 of 380
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by StanD View Post
 

That kind of software is usually used for Music production software like Cakewalk Sonar and the like that have specific software plugin interfaces. Not sure if one can get it to work with foobar, etc. I took a peek at that link and didn't spot which interfaces they support. But that does look like it might work if it can be turned down for audiophile use and not be aggresive, If one is using an Android, iDevice or other DAP then all bets are off.

Edit: I just spotted they mentioned VST compatability.

 

FB2K has a VST framework plugin available, I believe... so if it's VST compatible, then it could work.

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