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Logitech G930 replacement drivers?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hey, I found myself coming to this website often whenever I wondered something about headphones and figured I'd finally make an account here, especially since I need some more detailed help than what Google searching has resulted.

 

I bought a Logitech G930 a few weeks ago. It's great, I love all the features and whatnot (I use it primarily on a Mac, which isn't supported, so I don't get to use the G keys or surround sound, but everything else works fine). My only complaint is that the audio quality is terrible. Anything I listen to with them that uses even the slightest amount of bass becomes grotesquely distorted and crackly.

 

I booted my Mac into Windows and tried out the Logitech Gaming Software to see if software drivers were the problem. After messing with the equalizer and turning each audio channel down from volume 11 (the max) down to 9, I tried listening to the same music. They seemed to sound better, but it was still unbearable, especially when playing games with lots of explosions.

 

I bought these off eBay for only $50 (it's a $150 headset) so while that may have been a great deal, it's possible that the physical drivers have been replaced. Either that, or the previous owner completely abused these headphones until the audio quality turned into what it is now. Or maybe they just sucked to begin with (I looked up this problem online, and many G930 owners seem to have this problem, so this may be the case afterall).

 

For whatever reason my G930 sounds terrible, I think that maybe replacing the physical drivers in it may resolve my problem (if you can think of something else I should do instead, please feel free to mention it). Can anyone advise me on what drivers I should buy as replacements? Will any 40mm drivers fit? I'd like to bump up this $150- headset to a $300+ "audiophile" grade headset, so feel free to mention the most expensive drivers there are (then again, I have no idea how expensive "expensive" headphone drivers are. I'd like to spend nothing more than $30 including shipping but I'm willing to go up to $50 if the sound is worth it). Some tips on what exactly I need to do to replace the drivers would be great too. Does this being a headset with lots of bells and whistles and fancy Windows software rather than just a pair of headphones make a difference? I looked online and saw that the headphone's drivers seem to be isolated in their own little compartment within the headset, so that's good. A YouTube tutorial would be helpful.

post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 
Don't everyone post at once now...
post #3 of 7

I understand your frustration but I think you will be hard pressed to accomplish the task you have set out on.

 

I suspect that replacing the drivers with anything other than the original Logitech G930 drivers would be impractical because most headphones/headsets have drivers that are tuned specifically to their particular housings (ear cups).  Putting them into different housings, even if the replacement drivers are of a higher quality, probably won't yield your desired results and would probably be a waste of money.  If nothing else, I doubt replacement drivers from another manufacture would even fit in the earcups of the G930.

 

Even if it were possible, I doubt you will find any replacement drivers for $30 - $50 that would raise the G930 to audiophile grade.

post #4 of 7

I would just buy a pair of headphones and a dedicated microphone at that price point. Most "features" included with headsets around that price are superfluous like volume control. They also don't tend to have the best of microphones equipped. There are a few good ones, but not within your price range. You either pay very little for a good one, or a ton for a better one. There's not much middle ground, I find.

 

Suffice it to say, no matter what you replace the drivers with, it's not going to sound the same because a headphone enclosure changes the sound as well, not just the driver. Even if you took Grado SR325i drivers and put them in an SR80i enclosure and vice-versa, they will not sound exactly the same. Remember that sound is an oscillation of airwaves, not some voodoo witchcraft. Anything within its range can affect the perceived sound quality.

 

That all said, if you really only want to spend ~$50 on a replacement option, Plantronics GameCom 380 is a good choice, and so is Corsair RS30 and Vengeance 1300. I don't really recommend them, though, since I have an adversity to headsets (not good as far as price to performance goes). #1 advice I can give, though: steer clear of Razer. Such awful audio products.

 

And no, you don't need surround sound. You're not actually getting surround sound in a headset, but virtual surround sound, which is identical to binaural audio. If you download software called Razer Surround, it'll give you the same experience as surround sound with just stereo. Yes, it works for headphones, too.

 

This might have been a little more in-depth than you needed, but what I'm trying to ultimately say is not to waste your time. I would just buy headphones.

post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dragonzeanse View Post
 

I would just buy a pair of headphones and a dedicated microphone at that price point. Most "features" included with headsets around that price are superfluous like volume control. They also don't tend to have the best of microphones equipped. There are a few good ones, but not within your price range. You either pay very little for a good one, or a ton for a better one. There's not much middle ground, I find.

 

Suffice it to say, no matter what you replace the drivers with, it's not going to sound the same because a headphone enclosure changes the sound as well, not just the driver. Even if you took Grado SR325i drivers and put them in an SR80i enclosure and vice-versa, they will not sound exactly the same. Remember that sound is an oscillation of airwaves, not some voodoo witchcraft. Anything within its range can affect the perceived sound quality.

 

That all said, if you really only want to spend ~$50 on a replacement option, Plantronics GameCom 380 is a good choice, and so is Corsair RS30 and Vengeance 1300. I don't really recommend them, though, since I have an adversity to headsets (not good as far as price to performance goes). #1 advice I can give, though: steer clear of Razer. Such awful audio products.

 

And no, you don't need surround sound. You're not actually getting surround sound in a headset, but virtual surround sound, which is identical to binaural audio. If you download software called Razer Surround, it'll give you the same experience as surround sound with just stereo. Yes, it works for headphones, too.

 

This might have been a little more in-depth than you needed, but what I'm trying to ultimately say is not to waste your time. I would just buy headphones.

I totally agree with you on Razer. I've owned two headsets, a keyboard, a mouse, and a controller from them. The controller broke after a few months, one headset was too uncomfortable to wear, the other one was too loose to stay on, and Razer's gaming software is so bad it rendered by mouse and keyboard as useless.

 

That said, Logitech has never screwed me over and everything about the G930 is great, aside from the terrible audio. Luckily, the person I bought this from on eBay has agreed to take it back and I've gone and ordered a brand new one from Best Buy. I'll report back here as to whether or not the audio is improved with the new one I get. If it isn't that great, I'll return it and try out the Corsair 2100.

 

I also agree with you on the surround sound part. I know the difference between digital and true surround sound, and it seems to me like digital surround sound is much better for headphones and headsets. I've heard that true surround sound headsets like the Razer Tiamat sound great and all, but the audio is a bit thin since it's just a bunch of tiny drivers as small as 20mm to give you true surround sound.

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 

Just got the brand new G930 in the mail today. As soon as I started playing audio... I knew they were going to be terrible. The sound isn't much improved (but it definitely sounds better, at least). I can't believe Logitech would finish putting this headset together, try it on, and say "yep, that sounds alright enough." I mean, when I'm playing Battlefield and shoot a shell from my tank it literally sounds like the drivers in it are trying to commit suicide by ripping themselves apart.

 

I'm going to return these and go for the Sennheiser RS 170... unless anyone can suggest a better pair of wireless headphones...

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4to15Characters View Post
 

Just got the brand new G930 in the mail today. As soon as I started playing audio... I knew they were going to be terrible. The sound isn't much improved (but it definitely sounds better, at least). I can't believe Logitech would finish putting this headset together, try it on, and say "yep, that sounds alright enough." I mean, when I'm playing Battlefield and shoot a shell from my tank it literally sounds like the drivers in it are trying to commit suicide by ripping themselves apart.

 

I'm going to return these and go for the Sennheiser RS 170... unless anyone can suggest a better pair of wireless headphones...


Insert caveats of wireless audio here. Look here if you're dead-set on wireless headphones. Keep in mind that you're paying a premium for the wireless capabilities rather than sound quality. Everything you find on that list is going to sound inferior to a similarly-priced wired headphone.


If your motherboard has Bluetooth or you have an adapter, your options are greater.

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