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wav 64bit problem?

post #1 of 30
Thread Starter 

Hi, i recenly downloaded a 64bit wav.. but the problem is, it sound distorted in some place.. is this my file prob or PC? actually i don have dac that support 64bit, i juz curious about 64bit song so i download it.. dono why it sounds like this.. my other dsf or dff file sound ok even at high volume.. hmm..please help

 

or maybe this is what they say is a fake?

 

http://postimg.org/image/d72cvxtft/

'

using foobar to play.. sorry about the chinese word.. LOLs

 

thanks by lee

post #2 of 30
Thread Starter 

anyone? am i posting wrong place? plase help..

post #3 of 30

Your DAC might not support 64 bit, since nobody uses 64 bit files for listening. Higher bit depth wont improve your sound quality, it doesn't store music information. It is used in audio processing for dithering, to remove static from recordings without losing the sound information. There is no reason to have a file that is more than 16 bits for listening, and the 64 bit file will sound exactly the same as 16 bit. Thus, your DAC probably doesn't support it.

post #4 of 30
Thread Starter 

hmmm.. sorry bro but i think some song are better in 24bit.. not sure about 64bit thats why i try to download one and try.. thanks for your reply! cheers..

post #5 of 30
Sorry bro, but it seems that you don't know what bit depth really is. It doesn't affect sound quality at all of recorded music with less than 100 dB's of dynamic range, which is all music.
post #6 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by fenderf4i View Post

Sorry bro, but it seems that you don't know what bit depth really is. It doesn't affect sound quality at all of recorded music with less than 100 dB's of dynamic range, which is all music.

 

You must mean bits above 16-bit ? (16bit = 16x6dB = 96dB).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by adisib View Post
 

Your DAC might not support 64 bit, since nobody uses 64 bit files for listening. Higher bit depth wont improve your sound quality, it doesn't store music information. It is used in audio processing for dithering, to remove static from recordings without losing the sound information. There is no reason to have a file that is more than 16 bits for listening, and the 64 bit file will sound exactly the same as 16 bit. Thus, your DAC probably doesn't support it.

 

? This science is pulled out of your hat. :cool:

post #7 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jiiteepee View Post
 

 

You must mean bits above 16-bit ? (16bit = 16x6dB = 96dB).

 

 

? This science is pulled out of your hat. :cool:

 

 

Nothing is being pulled out of a hat here. Music averages a dynamic range of about 10 dB's. 16 bit can achieve low 100 db's of dynamic range with dithering. The ONLY difference between 16, 24, or 64 bits is the amount of dynamic range, and no music makes use of it. There is no other sound quality enhancement from going to a higher bit depth. Going to a higher sample rate? Possibly. But not bit depth.


Edited by fenderf4i - 5/18/14 at 3:46pm
post #8 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by jiiteepee View Post

? This science is pulled out of your hat. cool.gif
What he means is that music is recorded in 24-bit to reduce the noise floor of the recording (due to the increased dynamic range). It is then dithered and converted to 16-bit giving it ~105dB of perceived dynamic range (more perceived than the 16-bit dynamic range of 96dB due to the dithering applied, but still the same amount of information stored... it's psychoacoustics).

Even classical music doesn't use the full 96dB of dynamic range, so any differences between 16-bit and 24-bit playback are a result of the DAC handling bit-depths differently, different mastering between the two recordings, or worst of all placebo is always a possibility with audio.

Even if music could use the 96dB of dynamic range, humans can only hear variances of ~1dB in volume, so you would have to be listening louder than 96dB to get any benefit from 24-bit. That volume level would deafen you quickly over long listening sessions.
Edited by ToddTheMetalGod - 5/18/14 at 12:48pm
post #9 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by fenderf4i View Post
 

 

 

Nothing is being pulled out of a hat here. Music averages a dynamic range of about 10 dB's. 16 bit can achieve low 100 db's of dynamic range with dithering. The ONLY difference between 16, 24, or 64 bits is the amount of dynamic range, and no music makes use of it. There is no other sound quality enhancement from going to a higher bit rate. Going to a higher sample rate? Possibly. But not bit rate.

 

I think you meant to say bit depth, not bit rate. Bit rate is the ratio of file size and play-time. Thus, a higher bit rate means more information is stored (i.e less was removed), which may or may not give better quality sound. Sample rate does not generally improve sound quality. You only need two samples in a wavelength to recreate it, and so with a frequency of 20kHz (threshold of human hearing) you don't benefit from a sample rate about 40khz. I don't think any recordings have less than 44.1khz anymore, so going up to 48kHz, 96kHz, or even 196kHz does not improve the sound quality, because all it does is allow for pitches higher than you can hear.

post #10 of 30
I absolutely meant bit depth. My brain to mouth functions do funny things sometimes!
post #11 of 30

It is not necessary fake.

The WAV standard allows for 64 bit float.

http://www-mmsp.ece.mcgill.ca/Documents/AudioFormats/WAVE/WAVE.html

 

Most of the time this format is used in recording studios.

Producing digital audio is doing many calculations.

Each calculation by design introduces a quantization error.

Hence they store the project in 64 bit to keep the quantization error down.

 

The OP might try to down-sample to 24 bits and check if this cures the problem.

 

 

post #12 of 30
Thread Starter 

thanks guys for replying.. @Roseval what do u mean by "The OP might try to down-sample to 24 bits and check if this cures the problem."? i hav downloaded 5 64bit wav juz to test whats so special about this file, since they are huge(file size).. LOLs.. 3 of them are ok.. the other 2 sound distorted at some high note etc..

 

1, i do not want to know this 64bit quality good or not

2. why it is distorted

3. laptop prob or wav prob

4. able to fix?

 

THANKS by lee.

post #13 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by fenderf4i View Post

 

Nothing is being pulled out of a hat here. Music averages a dynamic range of about 10 dB's. 16 bit can achieve low 100 db's of dynamic range with dithering. The ONLY difference between 16, 24, or 64 bits is the amount of dynamic range, and no music makes use of it. There is no other sound quality enhancement from going to a higher bit depth. Going to a higher sample rate? Possibly. But not bit depth.

 

10dB? You must mean DR values given by some measuring software as like TT-DR Meter ... have you ever checked the true dynamic range instruments/music has (piano as for an example http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/may99/articles/recpiano.htm, brass/reeds http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/jan99/articles/brass778.htm )?


Edited by jiiteepee - 5/20/14 at 7:20am
post #14 of 30
Of course I have. But that doesn't change the fact that recordings of those instruments have a small dynamic range, usually 6-10dB's these days.
post #15 of 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by momos View Post
 

thanks guys for replying.. @Roseval what do u mean by "The OP might try to down-sample to 24 bits and check if this cures the problem."? i hav downloaded 5 64bit wav juz to test whats so special about this file, since they are huge(file size).. LOLs.. 3 of them are ok.. the other 2 sound distorted at some high note etc..

 

1, i do not want to know this 64bit quality good or not

2. why it is distorted

3. laptop prob or wav prob

4. able to fix?

 

THANKS by lee.

 

1 This is the format used in studio's during production. No current DAC is able to resolve this. The best are able to resolve 22/23 bits.

16 bits is a dynamic range of 96 dB, 24 bits is a dynamic range of 144

 

2 It might be distorted because they produced it to loud (Digital Clipping)

Maybe the software is struggling with the 64 float format.

 

3 See 2, can be both

 

4 Try down sampling to 24 bits, check if this helps maybe the sheer bulk of the bit stream occasionally chokes the system

Load track in an audio editor like Audacity and check the places where you hear distortion. Maybe they exceed 0 dbfs.

 

If you want to try different resolutions try http://www.2l.no/hires/

 

 

Success

 

Vincent

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