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Why 24 bit audio and anything over 48k is not only worthless, but bad for music. - Page 22

post #316 of 334
So how would you differentiate it from Bath Maine? ...other than we're talking ancient Roman baths....
Paris Arkansas
London Ohio

Quote:
Originally Posted by Agharta View Post

Except nobody but an American would wonder whether you meant London in England or London in Ontario.

Edited by GrindingThud - 5/10/14 at 6:49am
post #317 of 334

In fact, Arkansas has them both lol and for that matter most every other state does too.  Paris, Arkansas or London, Arkansas, or England, Arkansas.

 

Cant forget about Nederland, Texas.  For those of you wondering Nederland is how you really call The Netherlands.

 

 

Ill admit though,  I havent seen any place called København in the states.

post #318 of 334
Lol, but only in the US do we see this nonsense. At least when it started there was New London and New York.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ComradeDylie View Post

In fact, Arkansas has them both lol and for that matter most every other state does too.  Paris, Arkansas or London, Arkansas, or England, Arkansas.

Cant forget about Nederland, Texas.  For those of you wondering Nederland is how you really call The Netherlands.


Ill admit though,  I havent seen any place called København in the states.
post #319 of 334
So what were we talking about.....24/48 audio?
post #320 of 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrindingThud View Post

So what were we talking about.....24/48 audio?
 


Boooring.

I checked Wikipedia and noticed that a Bergen, Kentucky has been changed into Burgin. I assume it makes perfect sense if you're a Kentuckian.

post #321 of 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrindingThud View Post

Lol, but only in the US do we see this nonsense. At least when it started there was New London and New York.

 

Whoa! Whoa! Cool your jets me mon, it was Nieuw Nederland and Nieuw Amsterdam way before it was New York.  And if you notice all of the stuff around present day New York is named after places in Nederland.  For example, Brooklyn (Breukleun or something), Harlem (Haarlem)  The Bronx (Jonas Bronck's Plantation), Yonkers (Jonkers),  Queens (even though England has Queens too but they dont have Queensday like they do in Nederland), I mean the whole place is all Dutch.  Then you got New Sweden down there in Delaware, New France up there in Quebec and you had New England too up there in Mass.  New Spain was somewhere, maybe Florida.  Our whole country was named this way!  Well heck, most of North and South America probably.  And random other places they discovered.  You've got Nova Scotia which is New Scotland, down there by New Zealand (Zeeland is a province in Nederland) they have New Britain and New Ireland down there by Papua New Guinea and there is a New Hanover there too for the Germans.  A handful of nations "discovered" most of the world and just named everything New (Insert place in their country)  it really isnt all that creative but what are ya gonna do.  I feel as though there should be a New Portugal somewhere,  probably would be near Brazil?


Edited by ComradeDylie - 5/10/14 at 7:33am
post #322 of 334

so you're telling me to go accross the US instead of wasting money travelling the world?

 

"it's a small world after all, it's a small world after all, it's a small small world" ^_^

post #323 of 334
The problem with saying "London, England" vs "London, Ontario" or "Paris, France" vs "Paris, Texas" is that it gives both cities an equal status, when clearly and unarguably the USA versions are secondary and inferior. It's an example of US cultural ignorance, as if the rest of the globe is somehow irrelevant.
post #324 of 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agharta View Post

The problem with saying "London, England" vs "London, Ontario" or "Paris, France" vs "Paris, Texas" is that it gives both cities an equal status, when clearly and unarguably the USA versions are secondary and inferior. It's an example of US cultural ignorance, as if the rest of the globe is somehow irrelevant.

Ontario isn't a state in USA.

Stop bashing USA and let's get on topic.

post #325 of 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by Agharta View Post

The problem with saying "London, England" vs "London, Ontario" or "Paris, France" vs "Paris, Texas" is that it gives both cities an equal status, when clearly and unarguably the USA versions are secondary and inferior. It's an example of US cultural ignorance, as if the rest of the globe is somehow irrelevant.

So, when I say that I have visited Anchorage, AK, or Denver, CO, am I being culturally ignorant against my own country?

post #326 of 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by limpidglitch View Post

When you saw the film Paris, Texas, did you groan then?

I believe there is a London in Ontario.

Even Bergen can be found in Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany, probably in the states as well.

Paris, Texas is one of the most beautifully strange movies I've ever seen.

I do think, however, that the oldest Bergen of them all is in Norway - founded in 1070AD.

If not the oldest, at least it is the most beautiful. :-)
post #327 of 334
Quote:
Originally Posted by cjl View Post

So, when I say that I have visited Anchorage, AK, or Denver, CO, am I being culturally ignorant against my own country?

Yes. Why do you need to identify the state?
post #328 of 334

I guess a delivery guy might care more than we do about those "small" details ^_^.

post #329 of 334

Well this went downhill fast

post #330 of 334
Is that downhill fast, Oh?
Quote:
Originally Posted by castleofargh View Post

I guess a delivery guy might care more than we do about those "small" details ^_^.

That is an address, and has nothing to do with how you reference a town in normal speech.
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