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Everybody has different ears... but HOW DIFFERENT? - Page 2

post #16 of 21
Thread Starter 

Oh man! Your clarification made it worse!

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

Oh man! Your clarification made it worse!

Uhoh, i should stop trying to explain things from my phone!

If you have any feedback on how i might make it less confusing, Pm and I'll edit.

Cheers
post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeaj View Post
 

I don't know which paper this is from, but also relevant:

See the gray shaded area for +/- 1 standard deviation. About 32% of people fall outside that range.

Looks like Moller et al Head-related transfer functions of human subjects JAES 43.5

 

There's much less variation in the blocked-meatus measurements, which I think should be more relevant to headphones or speakers.


Edited by higbvuyb - 4/24/14 at 8:33am
post #19 of 21
I'm sorry, ab initio, the dB does indeed inspire considerable confusion, but your explanation has not improved matters, and it's completely wrong in places.

dBA has nothing to do with amplitude, the A means 'A-weighted', and is based on the 40-phon Fletcher–Munson equal-loudness contour. The measurement is integrated across the audio band, with different frequencies contributing greater or lesser amounts to the total depending on the sensitivity of the human ear at those frequencies (at low volumes in this case). dBP is just something you have made up. The regular dB is perfectly adequate to deal with both power and voltage ratios. The confusion arises because 2* the voltage is 4* the power.

3dB represents a doubling of power (1.41*the voltage).

6dB represents a doubling of voltage (2*) and a quadrupling of the power.

10dB is 10* the power.

20dB is 10* the voltage.

Power doubles for every increase in voltage of sqrt(2), provided the impedance remains the same. This is the primary condition for the use of the dB for calculations, the calculation is only valid in a constant impedance environment.

w
post #20 of 21
Thread Starter 
Why not just talk about what 3dB sounds like?
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakibaki View Post

I'm sorry, ab initio, the dB does indeed inspire considerable confusion, but your explanation has not improved matters, and it's completely wrong in places.

dBA has nothing to do with amplitude, the A means 'A-weighted', and is based on the 40-phon Fletcher–Munson equal-loudness contour. The measurement is integrated across the audio band, with different frequencies contributing greater or lesser amounts to the total depending on the sensitivity of the human ear at those frequencies (at low volumes in this case). dBP is just something you have made up. The regular dB is perfectly adequate to deal with both power and voltage ratios. The confusion arises because 2* the voltage is 4* the power.

3dB represents a doubling of power (1.41*the voltage).

6dB represents a doubling of voltage (2*) and a quadrupling of the power.

10dB is 10* the power.

20dB is 10* the voltage.

Power doubles for every increase in voltage of sqrt(2), provided the impedance remains the same. This is the primary condition for the use of the dB for calculations, the calculation is only valid in a constant impedance environment.

w


Ha! You're absolutely right. I totally blew that. I meant dBu for the amplitude. My intentions were good, but unfortunately, my execution was quite poor.

 

I will fix the previous post, so hopefully fewer folks are led astray.

 

Fixed. Let me know if there is anything anybody is still unhappy about.

 

Cheers


Edited by ab initio - 4/24/14 at 7:29pm
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