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Driver cups (resonance)

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I have tried about 220 different pairs of headphones over the past 3 months and have come to observe a few things.

 

1. Deeper cups tend to be common amongst the better bass cans and some audiophile ones such as Denon/Fostex 

 

2. Hard shell cups/driver backing allow for more energy to be put to the drivers before the resonance of plastic shells interfere with the drivers low end signal.

 

My 2 favorite cans have aluminum/gunmetal aluminum backing and the Ultrasone Edition 8 has a superior bass to the Pro 900 (IMO) because the 900 suffers from a resonating vibration of the cups at high amp that the "Ruthenium" do not seem to suffer.

 

Sorry if I'm stating the obvious but most don't seem to put much into cup material or depth when considering high amp/ bass impact can hunting...though they seem to be related by solid housing and often deeper cups.

post #2 of 5

As far as I know, the characteristics of the air volume contained within the headphones (either behind the driver, or against your head) such as volume, venting, etc are the most important for resonance.

 

The housing material takes a back seat because even plastics are far more rigid than air is and so poor impedance matching would lessen the effects significantly.

I would also think that aluminium is poorly damped.

 

One thing you haven't considered is mechanical resonance of the pads.

post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the insight.  a 30Hz tone at high volume on a JVC 77X or an Ultrasone Pro 900 sound more like reflection. Like 2 hits. The driver and the vibration of the cups which you can tone down by holding your hands over the back...a bit anyway.

 

The sz2000 and Ultrasone 8 seem to not display this reflection until closer to 25-30Hz.

 

I used to spend hours with my car subs listening to tones over and over and over again. Maybe it's in my mind. It seems like the heavy plastics are hyper vibrating like my cars interior panels and creating a tone of their own and it happens later down the freq range with wood/aluminum.

 

Thanks for the reply.

post #4 of 5
Holding the housings can have other effects, like blocking vents, and preventing mechanical resonance of the housings (via the elasticity of the pads)

You shouldn't be hearing 2 hits due to the Haas effect, could it be an illusion? It takes a fraction of a second for sound to reflect off the back of the housing (~340m/s, ~5cm distance). You would hear it as slower decay (if it was audible, since bass instruments tend to decay very slowly).
Maybe they're just distorting at high volumes?

Human brains are very good at noticing associations (whether they exist or not) so even if it's in your mind that just means you're human like the rest of us.

Here is a good thread to read: http://www.head-fi.org/t/694963/sound-science-approach-to-modding-headphones
Edited by higbvuyb - 4/20/14 at 6:49am
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by higbvuyb View Post

Holding the housings can have other effects, like blocking vents, and preventing mechanical resonance of the housings (via the elasticity of the pads)

You shouldn't be hearing 2 hits due to the Haas effect, could it be an illusion? It takes a fraction of a second for sound to reflect off the back of the housing (~340m/s, ~5cm distance). You would hear it as slower decay (if it was audible, since bass instruments tend to decay very slowly).
Maybe they're just distorting at high volumes?

Human brains are very good at noticing associations (whether they exist or not) so even if it's in your mind that just means you're human like the rest of us.

Here is a good thread to read: http://www.head-fi.org/t/694963/sound-science-approach-to-modding-headphones

Thank you!!!:beerchug:

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