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[DIY] Takstar Pro 80 - Removable cable mod.

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

This isn't my first DIY job, but it is my first headphone one, and my first one where I took extra special care with my soldering and presentation.

 

When I got these cans the only thing that I didn't like about them was the needlessly heavy coiled cable. So I decided to do a little operation to change that. Of course you could say that I could've just recabled them, but a removable cable was the most logical and convenient solution. 

 

The cans look and sound great straight out of the box. The presentation is not too shabby when you look at the overall finish of the cans and the "hard case" which they come in. So why not fix it's only noticeable flaw.

 

 

 

The mod is actually a very simple procedure.

  1. Buy a 3.5mm chassis socket (This is the one I used)
  2. Make sure to have a male to male 3.5mm cable ready to go. (I made my own)
  3. Disassemble
  4. Snip & remove OEM cable
  5. Prepare ear cup for the jack
  6. Solder onto contacts
  7. Testing
  8. Reassemble
  9. Profit!

 

 

Prerequisites

Get all you stuff together. You need a 3.5mm socket, a soldering gun/iron, solder, wire cutters, needle nose pliers, a small phillips head screw driver, a knife or wire stripper. Also you need an audio source to test the soldering and make sure you have that patch cable ready for testing. Last thing you want is to realise that you don't have a cable to use the cans.

 

Let's begin!

Opening the cup is VERY easy. There is no glue holding them together, only phillips head screws. There are 2 ways you can do it. One being releasing the left cup from the headband, this will give you better freedom of movement. Or you can twist the cup over the other to keep it in place.

 

 

Remove the cushion/pad. And unscrew the 4 screws holding on the front cover.

 

 

Peel the front cover from the driver housing. It's stuck on only because of the felt, so prying it with minimal force will unlodge it. Be careful not to pull the driver housing out too violently because you could pull the cords out. The wires for the right driver are very thin, as thin as on IEMs, thought the main cable seems to be the same gauge as CAT5 core wires and are very strong.

 

 

Now carefully take the driver housing out of the cup and place it down next to it. You'll see an oval donut of dampening felt which you need to remove.

Now that you're here, using you wire cutters you need to cut the OEM cable below the knot. Pull the rest of the cable and the rubber grommet out. Undo the knot on the driver end and remove the shielding to expose the 3 wires: Black is the right channel, Red is the ground and Green is the left channel. Trim the wires to your desired length, strip and tin the wires, ready for soldering to the socket.

 

Next step is to prepare the cup so that the 3.5mm socket will fit without any interference. Using you wire cutter you need to completely remove some plastic from the back of the driver housing and inside the cup (red arrows show what needs to be removed in photos below).

 

 

 

Solder the wires to the contacts on the socket. All sockets are manufacture differently, so make sure to have the correct contacts. Once this is done, wait for the solder beads to cool down and then test that both drivers are playing and that you have the left and right channels correct. If you're happy with it, put back the dampening felt and screw the socket into the original OEM hole (you may also you glue to hold it in place. I didn't. I hate glue.). Coincidentally, the rebate in the dampening felt was the perfect size for the socket I bought, and the hole looks to be around 8mm while the threaded socket head was around 6-7mm which was perfect also. Try to be careful whilst using pliers to screw on the socket nut. I accidentally scratched the cup doing this.

 

 

 

Reconstruct the cup the way you took it apart and enjoy your handy work!

 

Profit! :beerchug:

 

 

 

 

 

--EDIT--

 

PS. I've got a more in depth and universal guide on doing this mod on our blog @ TechnoFAQ. Click this link if you want to have a look and see if you can do this yourself.


Edited by DJScope - 4/19/14 at 9:21pm
post #2 of 8

Nice job! That black foam over the driver in the second picture, is it stock or did you put it there yourself? I was just wondering because my pro80 does not have that...

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beocord View Post

Nice job! That black foam over the driver in the second picture, is it stock or did you put it there yourself? I was just wondering because my pro80 does not have that...


Thanks mate!

Yeah. That layer of foam was there as stock. Its glued on.

Sent from Moto G XT1033 w/ Faux kernel.
post #4 of 8

Ok, thanks for the info. I'll have to find some thin foam pieces and try how it affects the sound. Seems there are atleast three different versions around. Straigh cable, coiled with the foam and coiled without it.

post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beocord View Post

Ok, thanks for the info. I'll have to find some thin foam pieces and try how it affects the sound. Seems there are atleast three different versions around. Straigh cable, coiled with the foam and coiled without it.


Strange that. Can you tell me what the impact on the sound is when you do. It'd be a shame for me to rip out the foam just to a hear a decrease in bass or whatever it may be.

Sent from Moto G XT1033 w/ Faux kernel.
post #6 of 8

I'll get back to you next week. I think I have proper foam pieces stored somewhere. I doubt't it has much effect. Propably just softens the highs a bit. HI2050 has a felt ring covering the driver and it does just that + adds a bit warmth to the sound in general. Not a huge difference.

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beocord View Post
 

I'll get back to you next week. I think I have proper foam pieces stored somewhere. I doubt't it has much effect. Propably just softens the highs a bit. HI2050 has a felt ring covering the driver and it does just that + adds a bit warmth to the sound in general. Not a huge difference.

 

Since you never got back to me, I recently removed the foam pads to try to see what happens. To my ears, the sound is much more natural now, bass less boomy and a minor increase in sound stage. So better without the pads. YMMV.

post #8 of 8

Sorry about that. I did not find the foam pieces. Then I had to move all of a sudden and now I'm not even sure where the headphones are. Too many headphones, and definately too many cardboard boxes filled with headphone stuff :o

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