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Logitech UE 9000 vs AKG K845BT - Page 2

post #16 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blitzraider View Post
 

 

My understanding is that the volume settings don't matter because you are still driving the music with the iPhone's amp. I think volume settings matter if you use an amp.

Okay.  Thanks!

post #17 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by blitzraider View Post
 

 

My understanding is that the volume settings don't matter because you are still driving the music with the iPhone's amp. I think volume settings matter if you use an amp.

 

If he's running it BT, the iPhone's amp isn't in use.  Generally, though, it's a good idea to run the iPhone at full volume so you use the AMP of the headphones the less.  It'll save power for the headphones as well as possibly make it sound a little better.

post #18 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post
 

 

If he's running it BT, the iPhone's amp isn't in use.  Generally, though, it's a good idea to run the iPhone at full volume so you use the AMP of the headphones the less.  It'll save power for the headphones as well as possibly make it sound a little better.

I am running BT, unless there's another way of running it?  But what you said makes sense.  I noticed when I paired them it automatically put the iPhone at full volume.

post #19 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjruiz View Post

I am running BT, unless there's another way of running it?  But what you said makes sense.  I noticed when I paired them it automatically put the iPhone at full volume.

Both models support running it with a cable. lol.
post #20 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

Both models support running it with a cable. lol.
I guess I should've rephrased the question. Is there another way of listening wirelessly.. I've heard of BT 4.0, aptx,AAC...etc...
post #21 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjruiz View Post


I guess I should've rephrased the question. Is there another way of listening wirelessly.. I've heard of BT 4.0, aptx,AAC...etc...

 

That's automatically decided for you.  Your phone will choose which codec to send that will have the best quality. 

post #22 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

That's automatically decided for you.  Your phone will choose which codec to send that will have the best quality. 

Ah okay cool, thanks! That works for me.
post #23 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjruiz View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

Both models support running it with a cable. lol.
I guess I should've rephrased the question. Is there another way of listening wirelessly.. I've heard of BT 4.0, aptx,AAC...etc...


As far as I know, aptx is the better profile, but iphones do not support it, so I guess you are using AAC.

post #24 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by apertotes View Post


As far as I know, aptx is the better profile, but iphones do not support it, so I guess you are using AAC.
Well the songs I'm listening too are mostly encoded AAC but yeah I've always heard that aptx is superior. Thanks!
post #25 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by apertotes View Post
 


As far as I know, aptx is the better profile, but iphones do not support it, so I guess you are using AAC.

 

APTX is a profile that supports FLAC / ALAC type streaming.  AAC is a codec which means that the device in question supports being able to play AAC files (or read the codec).  In otherwords, if the files are encoded with AAC, or MP3 (most modern BT devices support the MP3 codec as well as others), then you'll actually end up with a lossless signal of the lossy file as it ends up being the BT module that encodes the AAC data that is sent over the air (instead of the low-grade, SBC codec default).  Others may be supported as well: MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4 (normally used for video files). 

 

Before APTX, there was no container (AAC, MP3, MPX, MPEGX, etc) or codecs that supported a lossless one-to-one correspondence over BT.  That is why APTX was created.  It supports converting that FLAC/lossless file to the APTX codec (no data lost doing this, it's like converting WAV to FLAC, or CD to FLAC). 

 

That said, APTX isn't a better profile in contrast to AAC if you're using AAC files...  If you're using MP3 files, your device will not use the extra processing/bandwidth/processor to convert the MP3 into an APTX compatible format, it'll send it as MP3.  APTX is only used if you are streaming something lossless, otherwise, it's a waste of energy, power, and processor to use that codec.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjruiz View Post


Well the songs I'm listening too are mostly encoded AAC but yeah I've always heard that aptx is superior. Thanks!

 

You default to AAC if you're using AAC files...  If you're using MP3, you default to MP3... 

 

For those more interested in how these work: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth_profile#Advanced_Audio_Distribution_Profile_.28A2DP.29

 

Essentially, the low-grade SBC is a default that must be supported by the A2DP protocol.  Other file-type support/codec support is optional, and if its there, it'll be used. 

post #26 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by apertotes View Post
 


As far as I know, aptx is the better profile, but iphones do not support it, so I guess you are using AAC.

 

APTX is a profile that supports FLAC / ALAC type streaming.  AAC is a codec which means that the device in question supports being able to play AAC files (or read the codec).  In otherwords, if the files are encoded with AAC, or MP3 (most modern BT devices support the MP3 codec as well as others), then you'll actually end up with a lossless signal of the lossy file as it ends up being the BT module that encodes the AAC data that is sent over the air (instead of the low-grade, SBC codec default).  Others may be supported as well: MPEG-1, MPEG-2, MPEG-4 (normally used for video files). 

 

Before APTX, there was no container (AAC, MP3, MPX, MPEGX, etc) or codecs that supported a lossless one-to-one correspondence over BT.  That is why APTX was created.  It supports converting that FLAC/lossless file to the APTX codec (no data lost doing this, it's like converting WAV to FLAC, or CD to FLAC). 

 

That said, APTX isn't a better profile in contrast to AAC if you're using AAC files...  If you're using MP3 files, your device will not use the extra processing/bandwidth/processor to convert the MP3 into an APTX compatible format, it'll send it as MP3.  APTX is only used if you are streaming something lossless, otherwise, it's a waste of energy, power, and processor to use that codec.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjruiz View Post


Well the songs I'm listening too are mostly encoded AAC but yeah I've always heard that aptx is superior. Thanks!

 

You default to AAC if you're using AAC files...  If you're using MP3, you default to MP3... 

 

For those more interested in how these work: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluetooth_profile#Advanced_Audio_Distribution_Profile_.28A2DP.29

 

Essentially, the low-grade SBC is a default that must be supported by the A2DP protocol.  Other file-type support/codec support is optional, and if its there, it'll be used. 

 

Wow! Thanks a lot for the detailed explanation. So, if I am playing FLAC files on my phone, a headphone aptx capable would give me (all other variables equal) a better sound quality than a non-aptx headphone, right?

 

And what about streaming services like Rdio or Spotify? or even Google Music. Would any of those make use of aptx profile?

post #27 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by apertotes View Post

Wow! Thanks a lot for the detailed explanation. So, if I am playing FLAC files on my phone, a headphone aptx capable would give me (all other variables equal) a better sound quality than a non-aptx headphone, right?

And what about streaming services like Rdio or Spotify? or even Google Music. Would any of those make use of aptx profile?

If you are using FLAC files, you'll want an APTX compatible headphone. For web services, they generally use MP3 (most modern BT devices support that). iTunes Radio is the exception as it uses AAC.
post #28 of 71
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post


If you are using FLAC files, you'll want an APTX compatible headphone. For web services, they generally use MP3 (most modern BT devices support that). iTunes Radio is the exception as it uses AAC.

Thanks so much tinyman392!!  I really appreciate the information you provided. 

post #29 of 71
Thread Starter 

So I've been playing around with them a bit over the weekend and noticed a few things.  Is there a proper way to adjust the headphones themselves?  When I press the headphones themselves against my ears they sound better (more punch/depth in the lows-mids) with a firmer seal.  I've tried adjusting the headband a bit and pivoting the cups as well; it's a little better but perhaps I'm missing something.  Also, does using different EQ's hurt the headphones in any way?  Otherwise, I've been enjoying them so far.

post #30 of 71
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjruiz View Post
 

So I've been playing around with them a bit over the weekend and noticed a few things.  Is there a proper way to adjust the headphones themselves?  When I press the headphones themselves against my ears they sound better (more punch/depth in the lows-mids) with a firmer seal.  I've tried adjusting the headband a bit and pivoting the cups as well; it's a little better but perhaps I'm missing something.  Also, does using different EQ's hurt the headphones in any way?  Otherwise, I've been enjoying them so far.

 

When you press the headphones up against your ear you do a couple things, first is that you do tighten the seal, second, if you cup over any holes, you can also adjust airflow in and out of the housings (and the drivers), third, you adjust the distance of the drivers from your ears...  All of those will change the sound a lot :p

 

EQing won't hurt the headphones, depending on who you ask, it can hurt the sound file that is being adjusted in real time. 

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