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Using wax on wood headphones

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, my Audeze cans came with a "wood care kit".

 

I'm tempted to use the kit on my Grados, Denons, and a few other woodies.

 

Has anyone had any experience with this stuff, or anything similar? 

post #2 of 8

Interesting I always use old english on my woodies.

But my friends suggest renaissance wax.

Any comments?


Edited by mcluxun - 4/6/14 at 8:10am
post #3 of 8

Depends on the phones.

 

If they use a lacquer or other clear coat then I wouldn't use any wood cleaner on them, maybe a damp cloth and a wipe down. Denon I'm pretty sure does this.

 

Grado and Audeze are likely just waxed or oiled and will require maintenance, so you're on track there.

post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65535 View Post
 

Depends on the phones.

 

If they use a lacquer or other clear coat then I wouldn't use any wood cleaner on them, maybe a damp cloth and a wipe down. Denon I'm pretty sure does this.

 

Grado and Audeze are likely just waxed or oiled and will require maintenance, so you're on track there.

 

Great advice!

 

I guess this leads to my next question - what does the wax actually do?

post #5 of 8

It fills the open pores in the wood which helps keep the wood moist. You don't want the wood to completely dry out or be too wet. So generally a finished wood product is sealed, wax allows for the natural wood grain to show and feel through where as a lacquer will fill the grain and give you a polished look when done properly. Both effectively lock in the moisture content of the wood, wax has to be reapplied since it too can dry out. You may also have to clean the wood which should be re waxed after cleaning.

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 65535 View Post
 

It fills the open pores in the wood which helps keep the wood moist. You don't want the wood to completely dry out or be too wet. So generally a finished wood product is sealed, wax allows for the natural wood grain to show and feel through where as a lacquer will fill the grain and give you a polished look when done properly. Both effectively lock in the moisture content of the wood, wax has to be reapplied since it too can dry out. You may also have to clean the wood which should be re waxed after cleaning.

 

Thanks heaps mate - 

 

I'll post photos later today of my waxxing adventures. 

 

Any other tips before I set off on my quest?

 

Your advice is much appreciated! 

post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 

My results are posted here:

 

I know you told me not to do it on the D5000.. 

 

But couldn't help myself!

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/713466/wooden-headphones-care-and-maintenance-thread

post #8 of 8

Looking good! 

 

You should check out "renaissance wax". It is used by practically all museums to preserve/protect their inventory, from furniture, to paintings, to firearms. I've been using it for about 6 months and its pretty amazing stuff. I even used it on a scratched up piece of glass and afterwards no one could see them. 

 

Heres a wikipedia entry: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renaissance_Wax

 

Anyway, Thanks for showing us what you did!

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