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Oppo PM-1 Planar Magnetic Headphone Impressions Thread - Page 17

post #241 of 3154

Found this old review.. http://hifilounge.tumblr.com/post/69254009138/oppo-pm-1-headphones-and-ha-1-headphone-amp-first

 

So the retail version sounds as good/better than the LCD-3?

Find that hard to believe I must say.

post #242 of 3154
It's got a seven layer diaphragm with a spiralling pattern of conductors on both sides. The stuff you see in the picture isn't the diaphragm, it's the protective cover over the diaphragm. I really can't tell what's going on inside there by looking at it.
post #243 of 3154

That was the first beta version I was sent to listen to. It had a little less treble and upper mids than the final version has. It was clean sounding and had fantastic bass and male vocal range, but it sounded a bit muffled at the top. It says in the article that they were planning on pulling back the bass. I think they actually ended up pulling back everything below about 1.5kHz or so, bringing the whole thing in line. I didn't have the first beta long enough to run tones on it. I just checked it by correcting with an EQ using natural sounding acoustic classical music. It was good, but the final retail version I just got is even better.
post #244 of 3154
Quote:
Originally Posted by HasturTheYellow View Post

The driver is the size of the yellow surface you see in the image.


The driver is also oval, not circular.

sure but most of the driver is covered by that black thingy with an opening for the sound to travel through that looks no bigger than a typical dynamic driver - just sayin'
Edited by up late - 4/6/14 at 12:35am
post #245 of 3154
Following this closely.
Described like the perfect headphone so far... That's funny!
post #246 of 3154
One correction... I'm told that the box they come in is made of wood. It has a very hard glossy finish and it isn't a type of wood I'm familiar with. I'll have to dig it out and look at it again.
post #247 of 3154

Weird, so it's like a ported horn design.  Will be interesting to hear what it sound like eventually.

post #248 of 3154
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

One correction... I'm told that the box they come in is made of wood. It has a very hard glossy finish and it isn't a type of wood I'm familiar with. I'll have to dig it out and look at it again.

 

One of the best packaging I've seen.  Certainly beats Sennheiser's HD800 packaging.

post #249 of 3154
I really like the denim portable case too. It makes it easier to take expensive cans with me incognito. You can really tell the folks who made these care.
post #250 of 3154
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

 

In the past, I've done experiments with equalizers to determine my own thresholds of audibility and to train myself to recognize specific frequencies. Your mileage on that may vary. Take that for what you want. But to evaluate the response of the Oppos, I used a signal generator and did sweeps a couple of octaves at a time and evened them out using an equalizer. Then I took note of my equalizer settings to determine the size of the bumps and dips. I checked my results against a second set of ears that belonged to a professional sound mixer. That isn't a completely inaccurate way to determine the response of headphones. I'm not comparing my response measurements with any other headphones or any other method of measuring response. You can feel free to determine those things for yourself. All I'm saying is that the response of the Oppos is exactly the way I like... an audibly flat response for my ears.


Since you determined by ear that the Oppo phones were flat, how did you handle the Fletcher-Munson phenomenon (equal loudness contours)?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher%E2%80%93Munson_curves

 

The problem is that human ears are not flat (as the equal loudness contours show).  To sound flat to the human ear when doing a frequency sweep, a speaker's response curve needs to be V-shaped.  The human ear is at its flattest with loud response sweeps, but the ear is still not flat--and the speaker must be nonflat to sound flat to the ear. 

 

Hence, to conclude by ear from response sweeps that a speaker is flat would actually be evidence that the speaker is not flat, or so it seems to me.

 

So again, how did you deal with the Fletcher-Munson phenomenon?

post #251 of 3154
I left that to my sound mixer friend. He tunes speaker systems in live venues for a living and knows how to deal with the sensitivity in the upper mids. I did sweeps in bits alongside him- an octave and a half wide at a time looking for bumps and dips. He did the final pass over the whole range at the very end.
Edited by bigshot - 4/6/14 at 12:46am
post #252 of 3154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headphoner View Post
 


Since you determined by ear that the Oppo phones were flat, how did you handle the Fletcher-Munson phenomenon (equal loudness contours)?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fletcher%E2%80%93Munson_curves

 

The problem is that human ears are not flat (as the equal loudness contours show).  To sound flat to the human ear when doing a frequency sweep, a speaker's response curve needs to be V-shaped.  The human ear is at its flattest with loud response sweeps, but the ear is still not flat--and the speaker must be nonflat to sound flat to the ear. 

 

Hence, to conclude by ear from response sweeps that a speaker is flat would actually be evidence that the speaker is not flat, or so it seems to me.

 

So again, how did you deal with the Fletcher-Munson phenomenon?

 

Well he doesn't have to do that does he? Since he is using his own ears.

If they sound flat to your ears then they are flat, that's the whole idea isn't it?

Have to use the compensation stuff when using microphones to measure FR.

 

 

 

post #253 of 3154
Quote:
Originally Posted by pfillion View Post
 

 

 

$699 for a pair of headphone that will probably rival with the LCD-X/LCD-3/HE-6...

 

That would truly be an accomplishment, but I don't see that happening. I could be proved wrong, but somehow I doubt it's going to be able to play in that league. And that's not a knock at all...I've been a fan and a customer of Oppo for several years now and I'm excited to pick up a pair. I'd be pretty excited if it can best the LCD-2s and HE-500s, personally. 

post #254 of 3154
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post

I left that to my sound mixer friend. He tunes speaker systems in live venues for a living and knows how to deal with the sensitivity in the upper mids. I did sweeps in bits alongside him- an octave and a half wide at a time looking for bumps and dips. He did the final pass over the whole range at the very end.


I think I follow now.  You spent most of your ear time looking for localized bumps and dips in the response, looking at limited frequency ranges one at a time.  And then you and your friend evaluated the overall complete frequency range by ear, comparing it to, among other things, your considerable experience with live music.

 

I appreciate your efforts and believe you have provided very useful information.

 

Could you comment on two things?

 

1. How open and airy is the sound?

 

2. Do the phones provide any sound isolation from environmental noise?

post #255 of 3154
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post


Flat response is what you hear when you are sitting in a recording studio listening to the playback of the mix or if you are sittting in front of a string quartet performing live. It's REAL sound.

 

 

I don't know that there is no enhancement or attenuation of various frequencies when you hear a live performance, but I do know that my appreciation for live music - just as with speakers and headphones - goes way beyond what just the FR represents. 

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