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Oppo PM-1 Planar Magnetic Headphone Impressions Thread - Page 104

post #1546 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpudHarris View Post


Fair enough. Why don't you hold out and get the PM-2 if the PM-1 is a stretch, I doubt you would dislike them and you are obviously interested as you are still here...

I am considering the PM-2 later down the line [after the HE-560 or if I am unhappy with it] but the EU pricing is really off-putting for me... It comes to $1800 for PM-1 and around $1200 for PM-2, that's a tough pill to swallow IMO.

Unless one's willing to import from the States, which might not come out much cheaper. Or is willing to pay the EU premium price, or wait for a price drop [hopefully even a price fix, Oppo?:rolleyes:].

post #1547 of 3442

I copied the chart below from another thread.  I don't know the origin of the chart.  What is of interest is that the chart shows the frequency range for "air" (bottom right).  The Oppo phones have little or no energy in this frequency range.

 

The chart also shows that the upper harmonics for some instruments, for example the violin, extend into the frequency range where the Oppo phones have little or no energy.

 

 

post #1548 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smarty-pants View Post
 

That makes me wonder how they actually tighten them to speck, and if they can be altered by the consumer to make them a little less or more tight based on any given persons comfort zone. I mean some people do have pretty fat heads. Not me, but some people...
I'm sure there will be 'proposed mods' at some point in time.

 

The headband band is completely covered in leather so you can't actually see the mechanics of it.  It would make me very nervous to start bending it without seeing what was going on in there.  But the top of the band (inside the leather) is spring steel or something very similar.  Very flexible, and it can be stretched way far out before the tension cranks up.  Seems like it would fit a wide range of head sizes.

post #1549 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headphoner View Post
 

I copied the chart below from another thread.  I don't know the origin of the chart.  What is of interest is that the chart shows the frequency range for "air" (bottom right).  The Oppo phones have little or no energy in this frequency range.

 

You know, I would buy most of this chart except I don't quite know what "air" at 20kH is supposed to sound like.  I'm being serious, most of the stuff on the chart seems reasonable to me until you get into that "High Freqs" category.  What does "definition" sound like?

post #1550 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogodei View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smarty-pants View Post
 

That makes me wonder how they actually tighten them to speck, and if they can be altered by the consumer to make them a little less or more tight based on any given persons comfort zone. I mean some people do have pretty fat heads. Not me, but some people...
I'm sure there will be 'proposed mods' at some point in time.

 

The headband band is completely covered in leather so you can't actually see the mechanics of it.  It would make me very nervous to start bending it without seeing what was going on in there.  But the top of the band (inside the leather) is spring steel or something very similar.  Very flexible, and it can be stretched way far out before the tension cranks up.  Seems like it would fit a wide range of head sizes.

I'm sure you are right. I was just spitballing random thoughts.
File it under "things that make you go, hmmm...".
I would never tinker with something so lovely as the PM-1 and of course since it costs as much as it does,
but there are some brave people out there who like to dissect anything, lol.


Edited by Smarty-pants - 5/1/14 at 8:59pm
post #1551 of 3442

On truck, ready for delivery. :wink:  Looks like a long lunch break for MattTCG. 

post #1552 of 3442

I submitted my review to Part Time Audiophile so wlil keep you posted- its has to be edited an then go to Oppo for a fact check-

post #1553 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by HasturTheYellow View Post

Can't talk about the European pricing, but the US pricing will be $1,199.00. Release date still to be determined.

I was really hoping to order the PM-1 and HA-1 together today, but no release yet (plus the hp stand is out of stock)mad.gif

Soooooooo, I picked up the LCD-XC on the way home from work eek.gif. Thanks Headphone Bar! I told you guys my trigger finger was itchy.

I know I'll still pick up the HA-1, but I'll wait to hear more impressions on the PM-1. Plus, now I have to wait for my wallet to recover a bit.
post #1554 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headphoner View Post
 

The chart also shows that the upper harmonics for some instruments, for example the violin, extend into the frequency range where the Oppo phones have little or no energy.

 

 

The chart also shows that 99.9999999% of the sound of musical instruments fall into the range in which the PM-1 operates.

post #1555 of 3442
Humm, to my ears they are very very very close to the LCD-3 and if I remember correctly the LCD-3 are $1945.

And by the way the LCD-3 are my favorite headphones. (I had 4 different pairs of LCD-2, 3 different pairs of LCD-3 and 1 pair of LCD-X)
post #1556 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headphoner View Post

I copied the chart below from another thread.  I don't know the origin of the chart.  What is of interest is that the chart shows the frequency range for "air" (bottom right).  The Oppo phones have little or no energy in this frequency range.

The chart also shows that the upper harmonics for some instruments, for example the violin, extend into the frequency range where the Oppo phones have little or no energy.




makes sense
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogodei View Post

You know, I would buy most of this chart except I don't quite know what "air" at 20kH is supposed to sound like.  I'm being serious, most of the stuff on the chart seems reasonable to me until you get into that "High Freqs" category.  What does "definition" sound like?

you know it when you hear it - think hd800 and when you don't - think lcd2/lcd3
post #1557 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by pfillion View Post

Humm, to my ears they are very very very close to the LCD-3 and if I remember correctly the LCD-3 are $1945.

And by the way the LCD-3 are my favorite headphones. (I had 4 different pairs of LCD-2, 3 different pairs of LCD-3 and 1 pair of LCD-X)

Really good to hear, thanks for the impressions. I love the Audeze house sound and the XC sounds great to me, big improvement over the LCD-2 rev2. If they really sound that close to the LCD-3 then I'll just have to get a pair as well. My interest is also peaked by how little the PM-1's appear to leak sound. I would have ordered them already but I wanted to get the whole shebang at the same time as I'm in Canada and don't want to pay for multiple shipping/brokerage costs, plus I'm VERY impatient and wanted something now haha. I'll probably order the whole Oppo deal in a couple of months.

I'm really in it deep man!
post #1558 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Headphoner View Post
 

I copied the chart below from another thread.  I don't know the origin of the chart.  What is of interest is that the chart shows the frequency range for "air" (bottom right).  The Oppo phones have little or no energy in this frequency range.

 

The chart also shows that the upper harmonics for some instruments, for example the violin, extend into the frequency range where the Oppo phones have little or no energy.

 

 

This chart has only one error that I can see, and that is for the pipe organ:  Principals in the 1-1/3' and 1' ranks common to some mixtures will send harmonics out to 16.5 kHz typically, 24.8 to 33 kHz for certain installations needed in outsize halls to compensate for "air" attenuation with distance (the 8.25 kHz maximum shown is correct for the fundamentals in a 1' rank).  Pipe organs with 32' ranks sound down to 16 Hz, which I consider the bottom limit of pitch detection.

 

From the response charts on other posts this Thread, the Oppo® PM-1 should handle reproduction of almost everything that one can expect to hear at listening distances typical of live concerts.  I'll see how true that holds of the PM-2 in comparison to the PM-1, both of which should be available for audition at the July 2014 Meet at San Francisco.

post #1559 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by ogodei View Post
 

 

You know, I would buy most of this chart except I don't quite know what "air" at 20kH is supposed to sound like.  I'm being serious, most of the stuff on the chart seems reasonable to me until you get into that "High Freqs" category.  What does "definition" sound like?


Air is hard to define.  When air is present, it is heard mixed in with the sound of a musical instrument.  I conceive of it this way: 

 

Imagine a 15 kHz harmonic of a note played by a violin.  There will be 15,000 peak condensations and 15,000 peak rarefactions of air pressure hitting your ears each second from that violin harmonic.  During and between those peak condensations and peak rarefactions, your ear is also hearing low frequencies coming from a number of sources, including room sound, sound from other instruments (perhaps also from the same instrument), room reverberation, etc.  I believe air is the microcontrast, happening 15,000 times a second for the condensations and 15,000 times a second for the rarefactions, between the 15 kHz violin harmonic and the low frequencies.  If this analysis is correct, then to hear the air illustrated here one not only needs phones that are capable of producing the 15 kHz harmonic (which the Oppo phones don't do) and also the low frequencies (which the Oppo phones do well).

 

The effect of air on the reproduction of musical instruments is to make them seem more realistic, more natural, and less hard on the ears.  Air also helps give instruments a sense of being positioned in space.

 

I welcome help from anyone on this explanation.


Edited by Headphoner - 5/2/14 at 12:19am
post #1560 of 3442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Beagle View Post
 

 

The chart also shows that 99.9999999% of the sound of musical instruments fall into the range in which the PM-1 operates.


I don't see how you calculated the figure "99.9999999%."  Nor do I see how this figure is important.  The plain fact is that one can hear the difference between reproduction with air and reproduction without air--this is what is important, no matter what the percentages are.

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