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How could i get the sound out of my head.

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hello, i cannot stand anymore the sensation of sound inside my head while listening to headphones.
I found this stressing in the long term.
Is there any crossfeed system/software/device able to give the sensation of sound coming from the front ?
Or are there any headphones able to provide this ?
Thanks a lot
Kind regards,
gino
Edited by ginetto61 - 4/1/14 at 12:52am
post #2 of 15

http://www.smyth-research.com/technology.html

 

http://www.head-fi.org/newsearch?advanced=1&action=disp&search=smyth+realizer&titleonly=0&byuser=&output=posts&replycompare=gt&numupdates=&sdate=0&newer=1&sort=relevance&order=descending&Search=SEARCH&Search=SEARCH

post #3 of 15
A less costly option:
Foobar or Winamp + bauer Crossfeed

Cheers
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 

 

Hi and thanks a lot !

i have to read carefully but it looks something extremely high end

I am very interested in this issue ... i intend to listen to headphone more and more

Let me read carefully even if i am afraid this excellent unit is a little too expensive for me

Thanks a lot

Regards,

gino

post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post

A less costly option:
Foobar or Winamp + bauer Crossfeed

Cheers

Hello and thanks a lot !

i have tried the demo here

http://bs2b.sourceforge.net/

 

the effect is subtle nice but i am afraid not enough

I think the goal is to get the sound coming clearly from the front

I am sure that some of the sound purity will be lost but a good digital dsp system should be the solution

it is strange that in this time of 3D audio video experience nobody feel this need

Nevertheless i see an exceptional future for headphone listening

Me for one i have no other option for serious listening

Let's say for listening in general

And after a while the feeling of good sound but inside the head is fatiguing

Headphone systems have the potential for an ummatched virtual sound experience, that personally is my ultimate goal

to be transported in the place where the event has been recorded

I think that with binaural recordings the effect is already very satisfying.

Thanks again

Regards,

gino


Edited by ginetto61 - 4/1/14 at 12:06am
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginetto61 View Post
 

Hello and thanks a lot !

i have tried the demo here

http://bs2b.sourceforge.net/

 

the effect is subtle nice but i am afraid not enough

I think the goal is to get the sound coming clearly from the front

I am sure that some of the sound purity will be lost but a good digital dsp system should be the solution

it is strange that in this time of 3D audio video experience nobody feel this need

Nevertheless i see an exceptional future for headphone listening

Me for one i have no other option for serious listening

And after a while the feeling of good sound but inside the head is fatiguing

Thanks again

Regards,

gino


The demo is nice, but since it is a youtube video, it doesn't give you the opportunity to play with the parameters. Because everybody's head and ears are a little different, the head related transfer function will differ on an individual basis. The actual plugin let's you adjust the crossfed level and cutoff frequency to your own personal preference. My personal choice of setting in the BS2B plugin is a goosed crossfeed.

 

Be aware that there are only two channels in a headphone. The crossfeed DSP is exactly the DSP which helps headphones emulate a two speaker system. Other than the smyth realizer that adjusts the head related transfer function in real time as you move your head around your listening room to give the effect of spatial variations in the sound field, there is no way a headphone is going to present a two dimensional soundscape in the listening plane.

 

Keep in mind, your listening experience is also affected by other stimulus as well. If you lack the visual cue of speakers in front of you, it will be much harder to achieve the sensation of front originating sound. This is why the youtube binaural videos often recommend that you a) close your eyes and b) keep your head still during listening. (a), so that you eliminate the visual cue that tells you there are no speakers in front of you (or band/orchestra/singer/etc.. in front of you) and (b), so that you don't detect the lack of spatial variations in the sound field.

 

You should give the bs2b plugin a second, honest try, and play with the crossfeed settings to see if you can achieve a more realistic audio image. If that doesn't work out for you, sadly, I don't think you will find anything for headphones that gives whatever effect you think you want. In that case, you need to get a 2.1 or 5.1 speaker system and a listening room.

 

Cheers

post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post
 

The demo is nice, but since it is a youtube video, it doesn't give you the opportunity to play with the parameters. Because everybody's head and ears are a little different, the head related transfer function will differ on an individual basis. The actual plugin let's you adjust the crossfed level and cutoff frequency to your own personal preference. My personal choice of setting in the BS2B plugin is a goosed crossfeed.

Be aware that there are only two channels in a headphone. The crossfeed DSP is exactly the DSP which helps headphones emulate a two speaker system. Other than the smyth realizer that adjusts the head related transfer function in real time as you move your head around your listening room to give the effect of spatial variations in the sound field, there is no way a headphone is going to present a two dimensional soundscape in the listening plane.

 

Thanks a lot again.  I will dedicate the all weekend to play with this SW for sure.  I am extremely intrigued.  As i said i have to rely mostly on headphones for my listenings

 

Keep in mind, your listening experience is also affected by other stimulus as well. If you lack the visual cue of speakers in front of you, it will be much harder to achieve the sensation of front originating sound. This is why the youtube binaural videos often recommend that you a) close your eyes and b) keep your head still during listening. (a), so that you eliminate the visual cue that tells you there are no speakers in front of you (or band/orchestra/singer/etc.. in front of you) and (b), so that you don't detect the lack of spatial variations in the sound field.

 

Not a problem at all. I will switch off lights during listenings.  Actually i often do this already.

 

You should give the bs2b plugin a second, honest try, and play with the crossfeed settings to see if you can achieve a more realistic audio image.

If that doesn't work out for you, sadly, I don't think you will find anything for headphones that gives whatever effect you think you want. In that case, you need to get a 2.1 or 5.1 speaker system and a listening room.

Cheers

 

This is sure.  In the weekend i will do some tests and i am very optimistic.

If i will succeed in taking out a little the sound off my head i am done

I need to reduce fatigue in any possible way

Thank you sincerely again for the very valuable advice

Kind regards,

gino

 

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 15

There are also analog circuits out there that can crossfeed a stereo signal for headphone use; however, these are less configurable than a DSP (and BS2B already emulates this circuit). However, if you're into DIY projects, it might be fun!

 

Also, there are alternate crossfeed plugins out there if you google them (for example this one) You may decide you like another one better.

 

Cheers


Edited by ab initio - 4/1/14 at 1:45am
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post
 

There are also analog circuits out there that can crossfeed a stereo signal for headphone use; however, these are less configurable than a DSP (and BS2B already emulates this circuit). However, if you're into DIY projects, it might be fun!

 

Also, there are alternate crossfeed plugins out there if you google them (for example this one) You may decide you like another one better.

 

Cheers

Hi and thanks again

my feeling is that digital is the way to go ... not that i am an expert by the way

I will test the plug in for sure

Thanks again,

gino

post #10 of 15
Another option is CanOpener for iOS it includes crossfeed with some customizability.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post

A less costly option:
Foobar or Winamp + bauer Crossfeed

Cheers

 

Hi i have installed winamp and run the the Bauer .exe for winamp

Which setting are you using ? i tried both Meier and C-moy but .... always the sound is always in my head :o

Thanks, gino


Edited by ginetto61 - 4/1/14 at 10:06am
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by ginetto61 View Post

Hi i have installed winamp and run the the Bauer .exe for winamp
Which setting are you using ? i tried both Meier and C-moy but .... always the sound is always in my head redface.gif
Thanks, gino

Everybody's head and ears are different, so my setting may not apply to you. I set the gain to -2dB and the cutoff to about 300 or 400 hz. I suppose that might be a little wonky for some folks, but it gives me an artificial sensation of space. It also helps with headphone fatigue and i can listen for 6 continuously hours or so (especially if i work late into the night.... ) i will find myself forgetting that i have headphones on.

Your settings may differ and you will need to futz with the settings.

Cheers
post #13 of 15

You might be interested in:- http://www.johncon.com/john/SSheadphoneAmp/.

 

There's a program on that page which allows crossfeed preprocessing of audio files, i.e. you put in myfile.wav and you get out myfile-headphone.wav. The effect is tunable to an extent.

 

w

post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ab initio View Post


Everybody's head and ears are different, so my setting may not apply to you. I set the gain to -2dB and the cutoff to about 300 or 400 hz. I suppose that might be a little wonky for some folks, but it gives me an artificial sensation of space. It also helps with headphone fatigue and i can listen for 6 continuously hours or so (especially if i work late into the night.... ) i will find myself forgetting that i have headphones on.

Your settings may differ and you will need to futz with the settings.

Cheers

 

Thanks a lot again

i will experiment with settings during the weekend

With the default two ones the effect is mild

One last thought

if someone will be able to really take the sound off the head they will revolutionize the audio listening world completely

Just think how immensely easier is to monitor sound with an headphone

The bass effect is not a problem with a sub conveniently placed

But the sound should come to the front ... and i understand it is not an easy task

DSP is the way ... just to find the correct formula ...

Thanks again

kind regards,

gino


Edited by ginetto61 - 4/2/14 at 4:56am
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wakibaki View Post
 

You might be interested in:- http://www.johncon.com/john/SSheadphoneAmp/.

 

There's a program on that page which allows crossfeed preprocessing of audio files, i.e. you put in myfile.wav and you get out myfile-headphone.wav. The effect is tunable to an extent.

 

w

 

Hello and thanks for the advice

I need something less tricky.  By the way i feel i am asking really too much 

It is a really pity because the headphones have some characteristics that are so precious to me

I will wait for some advancement without big cost of course

Thanks and regards,

gino 

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