Head-Fi.org › Forums › Sponsor Announcements and Deals › The Eclipse TD-M1 IN STOCK!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Eclipse TD-M1 IN STOCK! - Page 4

post #46 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustinBieber View Post

Thank you for some great first impressions on the speakers! They seem much more promising than I originally thought.

Thanks! I really think the overall price makes a little more sense when you figure in they did the R&D to fit a pretty darn good sounding amp and dac in the base. Just going for a cleaner smaller design.
post #47 of 74
Thread Starter 

Hi All,

 

Here is another review I receive from G-Listen...

 

Eclipse td-M1 initial listen thoughts.

 

 Wiring up was a snap. However thinking that I could get everything else going without a manual was not possible. Hooking it up through the USB out on my Macbook was a breeze.However getting the Airplay network setup properly was something that had to be done with the manual in hand.

 

   I listened to HQ 24 bit files that I am familiar with along with some that I Have recorded myself.  The first thing that I noticed was the intimacy of the stereo image. with the 0-14 degree tilt angle it was possible to sit them on my desk and wrap my head in the sweet spot that gave a very headphone like listening experience. The sound signature to me seemed to be relatively flat crisp and clear. they were a pleasure to listen to. 

 

 The only drawback or  possibly a bonus was the bottom octave. to my ears the frequency curve seemed to drop dramatically at around 75 hz . Which is ok if you are using these speakers as intended which brings up the question of what is the purpose of these speakers.

 

 My opinion is that these speakers would work very well in an office environment or on a  fine polished desk of an executive in a room that smells of rich mahogany. these are built for intimate up close listening on your desk without the sub frequencies that would drive your fellow office space workers nuts. Volume is plenty for up close listening however I would not try to use these to replace my home entertainment system, but at the same time that is not the purpose of this system.

 No doubt these are audiophile worthy and the build quality is excellent. The heft of the speakers is more than you would expect. the are built solidly and  feel like little bricks when you are handling them.

 

 I would like to see an additional subwoofer option for this system for those of us that have desks that are not restrained under office sound ordinance policies. I my self in my day to day office work space  have two proprietary 18" subs at my desk and have no problem turning them up to the point that complaints from near by workers are drowned out. But I am the exception to the rule. If some houndstooth blazer wearing aston martin driving  audiophile executive  asked me for some grey poupon and a a desktop speaker system that would make the wild game mounted on the walls of his office smile, I would recommend the Eclipse TD-M1. 

 

 And for the record I did plug the Eclipse TD-M1 up and test it with an additional sub for fun and i must say it made the TD-M1 come alive and really give a wonderful listening experience.

 

 Didn't have enough time to test it out with my tactical transducer butt kicker 2 mounted to my office chair but theoretically that might be the ticket for bass you can feel but not hear for audiophile nirvana in an office setting..Now let me get back to my TPS reports.

Reply
post #48 of 74

Hy all.... I just purchased a pair of TD-M1, and waiting for the delivery next week.....I have a question for those of you who used it already...How do you get to add a subwoofer to these speakers? as i have seen from the specs, it doesn't have a dedicated sub-out. 

post #49 of 74

Since it doesn't have a sub out it would be a big pain to add one, cheapest way: get an adapter like this http://www.amazon.com/Belkin-RockStar-3-5-mm-Headphone-Splitter/dp/B0017PG8KS/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1403232251&sr=8-6&keywords=3.5mm+to+dual+3.5mm and connect both.

 

You can also use this: http://www.amazon.com/Behringer-UCA202-Audio-Interface/dp/B000KW2YEI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1403232613&sr=8-1&keywords=uca+202

 

The sub needs to have a high frequency cutoff/crossover (which most powered ones have) built in if you don't have a sub out and plan to use the adapter/behringer.

post #50 of 74
I just saw the Grado loaner program on Head-Fi's front page and I was reminded of this touring program.
http://www.head-fi.org/t/724510/grado-labs-new-e-series-headphones-and-loaner-program

Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd View Post

I have sorted out the loaner program. There will be 3 loaner pairs of the TD-M1 speakers - 1 for the east coast, 1 for the midwest and 1 for the west coast. 2 pair have already been shipped and the 3rd pair is leaving by Friday. So far there have been about 20 folks signed up and the distribution of geographic areas is pretty even so you will be looking at anywhere form a 1 week wait to an 8 or 9 week wait. I will allow a few more people to sign up and then I will close the loaner program. There are about 6 people on each geographical list... the first ones to email their info to me are at the top of the list...

I will email each of you a few days before the Eclipse TD-M1 is scheduled to ship to you to verify you will be available to receive, use and ship them back out. In the event you cannot you will move to the bottom of the list but remain as a scheduled participant.

Have fun and enjoy! I look forward to your impressions.

Todd
This was posted on 5/9/14. It seems quiet in here...too quiet.

Three pairs of speakers, 7 days each, 50 days have passed since that post. 50 days since that post / 7 days/person = 7 people, maybe 5 to compensate for shipping time.
We should have at least 15 reviews by now, or at least 15 people talk about it. Is the touring unit program still happening? The estimated 8-9 week waiting time are 1-2 weeks away respectively.
Edited by miceblue - 6/27/14 at 8:56pm
post #51 of 74

Guess what just landed?

 

It's pretty ridiculous that after all this time since the loaner tour started, we only have one review up. It seems discourteous of the people who participated to not be able to follow a simple request. I will definitely be posting my thoughts and impressions. 

 

Just a few things right off the bat:

 

Definitely compact size! The speakers are quite weighty though.

Pro tip: You need to download a driver before your PC will recognize the speakers. I spent a few minutes fiddling around with them wondering if I was a buffoon before reading the manual.

Positioning is quite important on these. I took a picture before putting them on stands. They sound better at ear level.

Upon first listen, I'm rather impressed. The sound is full and rich, they're stylish, and the setup was hassle free. So far, these sound like they could be worth the asking price. But then again, I bought an AK240 which some people think is absolute bollocks, so maybe your sense of value won't match with mine.

 

I'll actually try to make it down to a speaker store we have in Dallas for better comparisons. 

post #52 of 74
Eclipse TD-M1 Review



As someone who has barely started treading water into the ocean that is the world of speakers, I am not the most qualified reviewer of the Eclipse TD-M1 by a long shot. As a consumer who enjoys music and who has a fair grasp on what good sound sounds like, I can at least give you my honest opinion to help you decide whether these are worth your time and consideration.

I first became really interested in speakers after a private audition of the Sennheiser Orpheus in Dallas – the owner of said headphones also had a gorgeous pair of speakers in the room. To date, that was the audio reproduction experience for me. Period, hands down, game over the most lifelike system I’ve ever heard.

With my current limitations in regards to space (leasing an apartment) and financial flexibility (not enough to entertain the notion of owning high-end 5 figure+ speakers), the treated and dedicated to music listening room is currently an unreachable fantasy of mine that I hopefully get a chance to revisit some years down the line.

Signing up for the Eclipse demo was my optimistic hope at finding a stop-gap – a good sounding pair of speakers that would tide me over until the realization of my speaker dreams. When the TD-M1 arrived, I had minimal expectations but optimistic hopes. I set them up next to my Macbook on the computer desk and plugged them in… only to hear nothing.

After a bit of fumbling and user error on my part, I resigned myself to consulting the manual. A driver download and a few button presses later, I was tentatively hovering over the Play button in my media player.

Click.

Oh damn.
---

Let’s not mince words. I was impressed. The sound was clear and enveloping, filling the room with the crystalline vocals of Nagi Yanagi. The fact that the sound was able to permeate my cluttered bedroom caught me by surprise; I was expecting a much more 2D-like presentation.

While running through the playlist, I read a little more about the TD-M1 online. They come with a built in NOS-DAC, play nicely with files up to 24/192kbps and are pre-equipped for battle with a class D amp. Very nice for newbies such as myself who only have the foggiest of ideas as to what other equipment would be necessary to make a pair of speakers sound their best.

Detail is very good. No fatigue from treble peaky songs or mid-range smearing from the thwacks and thumps of bass-driven hip hop. Female vocals with guitar/piano (my own personal fetish) sounded clear and intimate. Quite excellent!

For those of us that may employ the speakers outside of the musical realm (blasphemy!), I made a couple Skype calls and ran through the paces of a couple computer games I had on hand. The TD-M1 performed very impressively – it was a significant step up in terms of audio quality, and I think in doing so it enhanced my enjoyment of each activity. I found the fact that you can adjust the speaker tilt to be a very nice and welcome touch. Originally I had it on stands, but with a quick pull of the lever adjusted it up slightly to the right height. Similarly impressive is that you don’t necessarily have to sit in the “sweet” spot to get the full effect. Even moving around the room doing various things, the speakers sounded very good.

Now for the bad – I personally don’t think these are suited for movies. Low end frequencies sounded rolled off to my ears as I went through my movie collection and fast-forwarded to impact intensive scenes. The TD-M1 would fare rather poorly as a replacement for a proper speaker setup in the living room, but as it was made for desktop usage I personally wouldn’t dock significant points for that. Similarly, it might not have the thump thump thump bassheads crave in their music – I went through some clubby stuff and the nonexistent low end bass energy and impact made it a boring listen compared to some of the other genres I tested.

I tried the wireless playback connecting to my iPhone 5 and was fairly unimpressed with the results. It’s a nice added touch and I could see it coming in handy for parties or easy listening. Just don’t expect the full effect of sitting it down and plugging it into a source directly. In terms of value, I don’t think that these can be considered bang-for-the-buck speakers. If you know what you’re doing and already own receivers/pre-amp & amp combos, audio and whatnot, the TD-M1 will probably fall short of what you can find out there for the $1,300 MSRP tag.
---

So let’s talk about the intended audience of the TD-M1. It has quite a bit going for it, including:

• A small, compact size
• The design looks sharp and appeals to the eyes
• Instant gratification – No need to fumble around with wires or other equipment
• Plug and play setup, conditions of the room are not that important

I think the TD-M1 will appeal to the following groups

• People who are newer to speakers that want an easy, no-hassle experience
• People who have limited real estate for large speaker setups
• People that place a high priority on aesthetics

Actually, it feels like the Fujitsu/Toyota team had my generation in mind with the creation of such a product. For people living in an apartment/condo that are looking for an entry point into the speaker world in the form of a compact eyeball shaped bundle of wonders at a reasonable price, look no further – the TD-M1 delivers. For everyone else, I’ll leave it to the individual to decide.




Edited by HideousPride - 7/11/14 at 3:05pm
post #53 of 74
Wrote it on my work laptop which unfortunately is running on some ancient version of Internet Explorer. I'll clean up the formatting and add pictures when I get home.
post #54 of 74

Before I begin my impressions, I'd just like to give out another thank you to the guys at TTVJ and everyone else who made this loaner program possible. I had some real fun listening to these little things.

 

Build quality/functionality: Superb. The speakers have a great amount of weight to them, much more than you would expect for their size. The white and black finishes also look excellent, much more so in real life than the photos you see online which do not do the TDM1s justice. The stands holding the eggshells feel extremely sturdy and are easy to adjust as well, those stands are composed of metal, I think it's steel or aluminum. The photos online, which again don't do these much, made it look like the stands were cheap plastic.

 

The box was also well done with tons of padding. Both speakers come with a soft cloth bag to protect them from scratches in transit. The box also doubles as a way to transport the speakers safely with a built in handle.

 

Functionality wise, they had a small learning curve but I got used to them after a couple of minutes. You change source by tapping the power button and use the arrows/dots to adjust volume. Touch registration works fairly well. The only issue is the volume must be adjusted very slowly (if you slide) or else the volume will fly up/down. They turn on/power off within seconds, without any pops or clicks. 

 

I tested USB, Aux in, and Airplay. Sound quality was consistent using the same music files, with no loss of fidelity whether by USB or Airplay. AUX in sounded the most different as the built in DAC was bypassed. I would not recommend simply plugging in a phone to the speakers, you can, but, the sound quality is reduced as most phones (like my Note 3) have bad on board sound. You will also have to adjust the volume a lot higher than normal as a phone outputs a lower voltage signal. Really, the AUX in sounds only as good as what you feed into it. Use the speakers DAC or buy your own for the best sound.

 

 

Sound quality: Pretty impressive. Now, I will admit, I'm not too experienced with speakers. I do almost all of my listening on high end headphones (some of my favorites are HE560 & the HD600) and I only have small experience with Audioengine's A5/A2 and NHT Superone speakers.

 

I'd describe the TM-M1s as nearly flat with a warm tilt. Timbre was excellent, I found that most instruments were rendered realistically as well as vocals. Treble doesn't have any glare or large amounts of sibilance. However, I think the treble though is a bit subdued for my tastes (I do prefer a modestly bright/neutral sound). Cymbals seem to not have as much energy as I would like and guitars lack a bit of bite, considering it doesn't have a dedicated tweeter this was expected. Though, this makes the TDM1 easy to listen to without fatigue and will attract listeners who prefer a warmer sound.

 

Imaging is a strong point, listening to jazz like Kind of Blue by Miles Davis or Waltz for Debby by Bill Evans, I could easily tell where the bass, sax, drums, etc. were without struggle. Soundstage wasn't as large in pure width compared to my NHT Superones, but, the Eclipse 's smaller soundstage was more focused, accurate, and less diffused with a clear amount of depth as well.

 

Not only did I try music on the TDM1, I also did a lot of gaming with them. With FPS shooters like BF3 and TF2, every subtle detail was present. I could tell where other people were walking even if I couldn't see them and even pinpoint where bullets, explosions, etc. were occurring. The lack of bass left out some cinematic experience, but, for competitive gaming (hearing footsteps for example) they were very clear in that situation.

 

 

Things I don't like: The only major faults that they have is a lack of sub bass. The bass that these do provide (mid bass above 70hz) is very clean and keeps up with quicker paced music. These speakers don't compensate for their sub bass deficit by adding a big mid bass hump that I've noticed some cheap speakers do.

 

I also do not like how a the speakers do not downsample high res files via airplay, anything above 44.1/16 will just simply refuse to play unless you manually convert the files. Otherwise, airplay works great using an iOS device or a third party android app (Air-audio).

 

 

Conclusion: The TDM1 is a good choice for anyone who is struggled for space or wants a no frills device. It's literally plug and play, minus a driver install on your PC. Obviously, for $1300, you can buy yourself one heck of a setup (Magnepan MMG, Emotiva UPA-100/Adcom GFA-545, a passive preamp, and Schiit Bifrost/AMB y2) for example. While most likely sounding better, it doesn't even come close to the portability, looks, or ease of the TDM1 (Multiple cables, racks of gear, two wall sockets, aesthetics, energy use) that are obviously needed with most conventional setups. 

 

Some quick snapshots. Click the photo to see a larger image.

 

 


Edited by JustinBieber - 7/14/14 at 3:57pm
post #55 of 74
Nice impressions y'all!

How loud do these speakers get? i.e if the vacuum is going off in the room next door, are the speakers able to get loud?

I'm also not too much of a speaker person *yet*, but how well do these do for basic gaming? e.g. Counter Strike, Team Fortress 2, DotA 2, and things of the sort
Edited by miceblue - 7/14/14 at 7:09pm
post #56 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

Nice impressions y'all!

How loud do these speakers get? i.e if the vacuum is going off in the room next door, are the speakers able to get loud?

I'm also not too much of a speaker person *yet*, but how well do these do for basic gaming? e.g. Counter Strike, Team Fortress 2, DotA 2, and things of the sort

Listening to modern music/pop, they get very loud to the point of pain for me (50%). I read well over 85dB on an SPL meter. On recordings with a large dynamic range (Vinyl rips, Explorations in space and time), they get fairly loud too but the volume has to be at 80-90%. 

 

This is with USB input. With AUX in, the volume is quite low out of an iPod/phone due to a lower voltage signal.

 

I covered how it did with games, TF2 and Battlefield, in my review. The answer: Not cinematically engaging (no throbbing bass from explosions, hyper detail, etc.) like you're at the movie theater. They are great competitive wise however, hearing opponents and spatial cues is a snap.

post #57 of 74
Loving the reviews! Waiting for my turn...
post #58 of 74

Thanks for impressions Jimmy, Bieber, and HideousPride.  I'm getting the sense these are great for jazz, classical, and vocals (podcasts, TV shows, etc.).  However, someone using an external DAC and splitting the signal off to a sub-woofer may get that missing low-end range.  Or use something like an AVR or Oppo BDP-103/105 with a subwoofer output.  I guess by doing that you then lose the small audio footprint on one's desk.

 

The premium price tag goes into aesthetics, R&D, and Apple compatibility.  Like most things we pay for convenience (small footprint/speaker/DAC/amp all-in-one) and if one were to purchase separate components of equal value one would have a better sounding system yet it would take up most of one's desk.  I'm still interested in hearing these.  I'm at the bottom of the listening list.  I've owned a lot of DACs and some single driver full-range speakers.  Curious to hear how the Eclipse compares against the realm of separates.   

 

I was reading this review and they mention a "DAC filter" that could be controlled using an iOS app or by some other method with the on-board commands.  I don't recall any mention of this filter in the Head-fi reviews but is there any mention in the manual of this filter or did the TechRadar reviewer get it wrong.  Does this have to do with turning off oversampling?  

 

"Through its settings menu, you can also adjust the dimmer which reduces the brightness of its LEDs after use, set the automatic standby time, and switch the DAC filter on or off. If you don't own an iOS device, you're stuck with the on-board controls – there's no remote in the box."

 

http://www.techradar.com/us/reviews/audio-visual/hi-fi-and-audio/hi-fi-and-av-speakers/eclipse-td-m1-1257521/review

post #59 of 74
I believe they have arrived. Will pick up from office today and get them set up this afternoon.
post #60 of 74

They are pretty great for those genres listed IMO. Onto the DAC filter, It doesn't mention a single word about it in the instruction manual. 

 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/eclipse-td-remote/id785205531?mt=8 shows the app and it appears to have the settings Techradar talked about.

 

 
Quote:
Originally Posted by WNBC View Post
 

Thanks for impressions Jimmy, Bieber, and HideousPride.  I'm getting the sense these are great for jazz, classical, and vocals (podcasts, TV shows, etc.).  However, someone using an external DAC and splitting the signal off to a sub-woofer may get that missing low-end range.  Or use something like an AVR or Oppo BDP-103/105 with a subwoofer output.  I guess by doing that you then lose the small audio footprint on one's desk.

 

The premium price tag goes into aesthetics, R&D, and Apple compatibility.  Like most things we pay for convenience (small footprint/speaker/DAC/amp all-in-one) and if one were to purchase separate components of equal value one would have a better sounding system yet it would take up most of one's desk.  I'm still interested in hearing these.  I'm at the bottom of the listening list.  I've owned a lot of DACs and some single driver full-range speakers.  Curious to hear how the Eclipse compares against the realm of separates.   

 

I was reading this review and they mention a "DAC filter" that could be controlled using an iOS app or by some other method with the on-board commands.  I don't recall any mention of this filter in the Head-fi reviews but is there any mention in the manual of this filter or did the TechRadar reviewer get it wrong.  Does this have to do with turning off oversampling?  

 

"Through its settings menu, you can also adjust the dimmer which reduces the brightness of its LEDs after use, set the automatic standby time, and switch the DAC filter on or off. If you don't own an iOS device, you're stuck with the on-board controls – there's no remote in the box."

 

http://www.techradar.com/us/reviews/audio-visual/hi-fi-and-audio/hi-fi-and-av-speakers/eclipse-td-m1-1257521/review

 
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Sponsor Announcements and Deals
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Sponsor Announcements and Deals › The Eclipse TD-M1 IN STOCK!