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Sony Magnesium Cases = too soft?? - Page 2

post #16 of 36
Mines not really a scratch. Its more of a blemish. Its a very short black line. But it sill pisses me off.
post #17 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by utdeep
Have you got any scratches on your e900 MacDEF? I'm really glad I got the blue model...
None that I can find, but I do take pretty good care of it
post #18 of 36
My E900 is one year old now, and I can't find a single scratch on it either, at least not any that's absolutely visible to the eye. And I have the one that has a polished mirror-like finish too. But, like MacDEF, I do baby my electronics quite a bit. Nobody touches my electronics with oily hands! I literally tell my friends to wash their hands before touching my stuff. They all go and do as told.
post #19 of 36
I didn't know that alumnium can be combined with lithium. I remember from my chemistry class that aluminum can be combined with many other metals to produce funny alloys with funny properties. I also remember reading how people were trying to engineer aluminum on the molecular level because certain crystal configurations that wrap around another metal molecule may produce materials of unusual properties.

Titanium is expensive and pure titnanium flakes. I wonder how much it would raise the price of a pcdp if it was made out of a titanium alloy.

Aren't the D-777's made out carbon fiber material?

One of my friends had the IBM lap top with the titanium top. It bent out of shap after placing a coffee mug on top. Rumor has it that the titanium sheet on top is thin enough for a person to bend in half with ease.
post #20 of 36
I'll vouch for the fact that my D-EJ925's top cover scratches pretty easy....Is this stuff inexpensive, or is it more of Sony's marketing hype by saying their high-end PCDP's are made of better materials?

If magnesium alloy is such a flammable combo, I'll make sure I don't get near a fire, or play a CD that has a lot of energy on it....

BTW, I haven't had any troubles with markings/scratches on my four-month-old R909, although I treat it like a surgeon doing an operation...
post #21 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Superbaldguy
If magnesium alloy is such a flammable combo, I'll make sure I don't get near a fire, or play a CD that has a lot of energy on it....
Magnesium is extremely reactive. It burns with an incredibly bright flame.

It MUST be made into various alloys to be at all useful as a casing for consumer electronics. Still, as gaineso pointed out, aluminum alloys are a much better choice.
post #22 of 36
"PURE" Titanium is impractical for any application, and is not really available other than as flakes or sponge or other raw material.

What is referred to as Comercially Pure Titanium comes in 3 grades and is a very practical for many applications from consumer products right up to hot gas bypass ducting like we manufactured for various Boeing airliners. There are also many exotic, "super alloy" Titaniums, such as 6Al-4V which can have tensile strength of over 200 000 PSI.

I have a Citizen Titanium Eco-Drive watch. Very light, very strong, made of CP Ti. 5 years old. Wear to work. Scratched, but you have to look. The frames of my glasses are anodized CP Ti. Very strong and light. Also 5 years old.

However, in reference to the IBM Ti lid notebooks, a large flat expanse of any material is easily bent. Even glass will bend to some extent, although it wil break before it creases. That lid must be fairly thin with no stiffening members.

Composites such as carbon fiber are actually far superior for that type of application, due to the fact that fiber orientation can provide serious strengthening in different axis.

Using exotic alloys in electronics, especially portable electronics, is a sales gimmick. Composites are far stronger, lighter, cheaper, completely corrosion proof, almost solvent proof, generally very long wearing, easily moldable in complex shapes. Military portable electronics are generally encased in composites for just these reasons.

Unfortunately, composites, no matter how high tech, still look like "plastic". Plastics can really be good stuff.
post #23 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by gaineso
Even glass will bend to some extent, although it wil break before it creases.
Glass doesn't "bend," per se. A better word is "flex." Glass flexes, but it will always spring back to its original shape if it doesn't break (at normal, everyday temperatures).
post #24 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Russ Arcuri
Glass doesn't "bend," per se. A better word is "flex." Glass flexes, but it will always spring back to its original shape if it doesn't break (at normal, everyday temperatures).
Pick one sentence and argue about semantics.

Sheese.

Did I spell that right??
post #25 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by gaineso
Pick one sentence and argue about semantics.

Sheese.

Did I spell that right??
A little sensitive, are we?

It's not just a matter of semantics in this context. The original guy said that a titanium component of a laptop bent. He said he got the impression it would be easy to fold in half. Unless I totally missed his meaning, that's a permanent deformation. That's a very different thing than flexing. Glass is not like titanium in that sense. So I was correcting more than just a minor wording error; the meaning is changed as well. Glass flexes, and will break if flexed too far. Titanium flexes, and if flexed too far will be permanently deformed -- i.e., bent.

Next thing someone will pipe in with the nonsense about glass flowing.
post #26 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Russ Arcuri
Glass doesn't "bend," per se. A better word is "flex." Glass flexes, but it will always spring back to its original shape if it doesn't break (at normal, everyday temperatures).
Pick one sentence and argue about semantics.

Perhaps we should say that it will "Flex" within the limits of elastic deformation. Beyond that limit, at standard temperature and pressure, it will break.

Sheese.

Did I spell that right??

I'd still rather have a good composite case than even the most advanced super alloys. BTW, the Supreme and Cosmic sized devices are almost more like "Transportable" than "portable". Not degrading them, because one of them is going to be my next purchase. I'm talking about things like pcdp's, pMD's, etc.

And I plan to use the bigger amp almost exclusively at home. There was some talk in another thread about a "new" TA. Lots of comments about a metal, titanium or aluminum, case. I like the case on mine. It's pretty damned solid and keeps all the parts where they belong.

Probably allowed Danny to design it to a price point and Tyll to sell it to that point. Maybe $10 to $15 less than metal. I personally don't listen to the case. I have dropped it once about 3 feet to concrete and twice about 4 feet to carpet. The cat knocked it on the floor and across the room once too. The only damage was trying to find what the little beast did with the short mini to mini cord.

I love metals. I've worked with them in testing and R&D most of my life. But. While I'm not an engineer, I'm a metallurgist, I've done enough engineering and worked with enough engineers to look for the most practical solution.

How did I get started on this. I've got work to do.

Oh Well
post #27 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by Vertigo-1
My E900 is one year old now, and I can't find a single scratch on it either, at least not any that's absolutely visible to the eye. And I have the one that has a polished mirror-like finish too. But, like MacDEF, I do baby my electronics quite a bit. Nobody touches my electronics with oily hands! I literally tell my friends to wash their hands before touching my stuff. They all go and do as told.
I do the EXACT same thing! My friends hate me for it.

It just came with my MD player.
post #28 of 36
Quote:
Originally posted by gaineso
[B
Unfortunately, composites, no matter how high tech, still look like "plastic". Plastics can really be good stuff. [/B]
and they don't act like antennae. another reason to use plastic on devices which can't be truly grounded. any RF engineers in the group?

composites are generally more durable. (saturn uses them for good reason.) true story: one post on one of the D25 threads caught hold. the left side of the lid does sit a tad higher. so, just bend it up a tad to level it out. might help; certainly couldn't hurt, right? welllllllllllllllllllll just a bit of pressure (not enough to actually get it bent), caused that beautiful raised disk to separate for about 90 degrees. <hangs the other maid's head in shame> superglue to the rescue; that and capillary action.

toodles,
robert
post #29 of 36
Hehe, how about the word histeresis?

Yeah, I checked out my friend's IBM laptop lid and its super thin. I can lean on and watch it bulge inwards. The Ti inside was obviously a marketing ploy.

I opened the IBM laptop and turned on the screen. I can see the LCD panel distort when I push down and move my fingers across the back of the screen. I tried doing the same with Dells and Toshibas. They have too much plastic inbetween to allow that to happen.

I always wanted a pcdp to have a brush aluminum casing. That would look cool.
post #30 of 36
Hey!
I bought a titanium IBM laptop (T20)when it came out for 3 grand... when I was working for them. I have to say that it was worth every penny. It's the overall Titanium panel that makes the difference. It was far superior to anything at that time. Sure it flexes a little bit, but it is incredibly tough to crack!! The T20 shedded 2pds off the previous series of business laptops (the 600s I think) while providing more protection and safety.
It was so innovative and awesome that even APPLE decided to use it on their next big thing...

Don't rip the IBM t series!
Or do it privately.... I'm still hurting after they dropped 43% in price the month after I bought it.
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