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How do I EQ out treble extensions and sibilance?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

If anyone has experience with this, let me know, thanks.

post #2 of 13

Sibilance is usually peak around 4kHz~8kHz, you need to play around and see where the exact peak is in your setup. As for treble extension, just gradually roll off everything above 15kHz and drop to -3dB at 20kHz should do the trick. Don't really know why you want to roll off treble though.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

There is too much treble coming out of my CK10

post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 

I put it back to neutral, software EQ really messes up the sound.  I don't think I can get rid of sibilance without finer EQ than the default on the foobar. Probably an iem filter would work out better. 

 

That leads me to a question, what software has the finest EQ adjustment with the greatest number of sliders?


Edited by SilverEars - 3/25/14 at 8:33pm
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverEars View Post
 

I put it back to neutral, software EQ really messes up the sound.  I don't think I can get rid of sibilance without finer EQ than the default on the foobar. Probably an iem filter would work out better. 

 

That leads me to a question, what software has the finest EQ adjustment with the greatest number of sliders?


You probably need to find yourself a decent 3rd party parametric EQ software package. I think foobar's built-in graphical eq is of questionable merit..

 

Cheers

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverEars View Post
 

I put it back to neutral, software EQ really messes up the sound.  I don't think I can get rid of sibilance without finer EQ than the default on the foobar. Probably an iem filter would work out better. 

 

That leads me to a question, what software has the finest EQ adjustment with the greatest number of sliders?

 

Graphics EQ isn't what you need ... try some parametric EQ.

 

http://www.head-fi.org/t/711123/eqing-up-the-bass-clips-distorts-on-my-usb-dac-software-or-hardware-issue#post_10381719

post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 

What is the difference between graphics and parametric EQ?

post #8 of 13

Graphic eq's have sliders for each frequency they are labeled for. Parametric are knobs where you can select a frequency and an outer knob to adjust q. Q is a meaning for how broad a band around the frequency you choose you want to effect.

 

For example I can choose 8k on my inner knob and with my outer knob "Q" I can set it to start effecting frequencies from 7k to 9k for example. Or even wider depending on how you set the Q 6k to 10k. so it's basically a setting for how wide a range you want to effect.

 

It's used in recording studios.

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 

Can you guys recommend me a parametric EQ for foobar?

post #10 of 13

Personally I don't know of one. But there is a foobar forum where you might get some suggestions.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverEars View Post
 

What is the difference between graphics and parametric EQ?

 

Main difference is that with graphics EQ you normally be able to only control the gain for certain selected center frequencies (fixed quality (bandwidth/Q)) when parametric EQ lets you control the gain, center frequency and bandwidth/Q and also use different type filters (hp, lp, hs, ls, pk, notch, bp, ap) as well.

 

To see the difference in practice, just download a VST plug-in analyzer from here http://www.savioursofsoul.de/Christian/programs/measurement-programs/

and graphics EQ's (usually the ones with sliders) and parametric EQ's (usually the ones with knobs) from here http://www.kvraudio.com/q.php?search=1&q=EQ

and execute some tests.


Edited by jiiteepee - 3/29/14 at 8:45am
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverEars View Post
 

Can you guys recommend me a parametric EQ for foobar?

 

Electri-Q is considered very good by many:

http://www.savioursofsoul.de/Christian/vst-plugins/eqs-filters/electri-q/

The nice thing about it is that it shows its impact on the frequency response curve, so it's relatively easy to get it right.

 

There's also Graphic Equalizer plugin which is much better than the standard one:

http://www.foobar2000.org/components/view/foo_dsp_xgeq

 

But I doubt this is a good approach to remove sibilance:

 

If it originates from the source (i.e. the recording) then there's not much else you can do. Just keep in mind that a sibilant recording will still come through as sibilant (only the effect will be less in your face), while the whole thing will sound muffled. 

 

However very often it is a mechanical resonance in the speakers/headphones or perhaps higher up the audio chain (for example HD800 have a bit of ringing around the 6kHz mark). Here EQ may be more effective, as this mechanical resonance often gets triggered only above certain volume level. It is also the easiest way to minimize the problem.

 

But if that was my system, I'd look for a different solution. The options would be to try to tame the effect mechanically (i.e. the Anaxilus mod for the mentioned HD800 ringing), reconfigure your audio stream (in some setups upsampling or changing the connection helps), or replace the problem component. 

post #13 of 13
Quote:
recommend me a parametric EQ

 

I know I bang on about pro and semi pro audio interfaces quite a bit but this is one of the areas in which they particularly shine.

 

RME, MOTU, Focusritre etc make and sell studio quality software as well as hardware.

 

If you want to see how a top class parametric EQ works take a look at this example from MOTU and their CueMix product.

 

http://www.motu.com/products/motuaudio/ultralite-mk3/cuemix-fx-overview.html

 

The parametric EQ specific bit in the video runs from 2.00 to 4.00 mins but it's all interesting.

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