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post #46 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post
 

 

My favorite writer Leo Tolstoy. Among Russian writers he is losing lately to Dostoevsky and Nabokov in popularity in the West, it seems. 

I disagree, even though I like Dostoyevsky more than Tolstoy. I feel Tolstoy is more popular.

post #47 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrathzombie View Post
 

I disagree, even though I like Dostoyevsky more than Tolstoy. I feel Tolstoy is more popular.

 

Russian linguist and one of the the best writers on Russian literature Prince Mirsky lived in England ( 1920s) and he wrote that Dostoevsky's not a popularity but status or importance in the West was higher than Tolstoy's. And Mirsky thought that it was wrong.

 

Quote:
 While teaching Russian literature in the University of London, Mirsky published his landmark study A History of Russian Literature: From Its Beginnings to 1900, which still remains a standard English-language guide to classical Russian literatureVladimir Nabokov recommended it to his students as "the best history of Russian literature in any language, including Russian". 

 

In Russia Tolsoy's status was tremendously high ( rivaled by only Pushkin). Dostoevsky didn't come even close. For Russian elite Tolstoy was like a God while Dostoevsky was thought-provoking polemicist and belletrist. 

 

In my opinion westerners appreciate Dostoevsky much more than Tolstoy ( that's from what I've read and heard). I think that Tolstoy is much more difficult for westerners to understand. They buy into Dostoevsky's intellectual gimmicks but fail to get Tolstoy's intense vision.


Edited by mutabor - 3/29/14 at 3:51am
post #48 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post
 

 

Russian linguist and one of the the best writers on Russian literature Prince Mirsky lived in England ( 1920s) and he wrote that Dostoevsky's not a popularity but status or importance in the West was higher than Tolstoy's. And Mirsky thought that it was wrong.

 

 

In Russia Tolsoy's status was tremendously high ( rivaled by only Pushkin). Dostoevsky didn't come even close. For Russian elite Tolstoy was like a God while Dostoevsky was thought-provoking polemicist and belletrist. 

 

In my opinion westerners appreciate Dostoevsky much more than Tolstoy ( that's from what I've read and heard). I think that Tolstoy is much more difficult for westerners to understand. They buy into Dostoevsky's intellectual gimmicks but fail to get Tolstoy's intense vision.

I have only read "crime and punishment" by Dostoevsky - i found it underrated and a bit boring at times with tiny snippets of brilliant writing. On the other hand i have read a lot of Tolstoy and for me "crime and punishment" just does not compare. 

 

That being said i will read more Dostoevsky. "The Idiot" and "Brothers Karamazov" are next on my Russian lit list

post #49 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post
 

Here are some of my favourite books. I need to read more, but that will likely only happen if I fly more places. Most of the books I've read are fairly old, because they were on my parents' bookshelves. I sometimes wish I still had their collection, because it had many books there that you simply cannot get nowadays.

 

--

 

The entire Modesty Blaise series. Imagine a '70s James Bond character that does martial arts. If you can get hold of them, they are awesome and not just about fighting the bad guys, but the characters have a lot of character, depth and humour.

The Reginald Hill Dalziel & Pascoe detective series. It was made into a TV series that was as good as the books. 

The Winged Pharaoh. Recalled from her past life as a Pharaoh in Egypt, her story is beyond description other than to say they lived with a honesty, wisdom and nobility far beyond anything we have today.

Stalky & Co, by Rudyard Kipling. It is heading towards being a century old and requires regular checking of the notes as there is a lot of latin and literary references in there, but is a brilliant story of naughty schoolboys in a military prep school, based on Kipling's own experiences (if somewhat over the top compared to the actual reality).

 

What is special to me about the above books is that the "good guys", police or school boys regularly ponder the -- I don't want to say "morality" -- but what they feel is right or wrong about their actions, not just that of the "bad guys", teachers or criminals, or in the case of the Winged Pharaoh, she can see into people's hearts and how they are caught up in their culture or other troubles that makes them who they are, but likewise the other books have people who cannot be other than they are and that is why they do evil.

 

I'm also going to mention my father's book: Science, Myth or Magic? It was the compilation of what he gave as a series of radio talks on what science is really about. Not just important, but enjoyable to read, as he was a very good communicator. Note: If you buy it, I get a few cents, but that's not really why I had the publisher make a Kindle version.

Thanks for posting. Kipling is another one of those author that i just have not gotten around to yet. Didn't he win the Nobel prize for literature? 

 

Your dads book is very intriguing, i love reading anything about science - i will take a further look into that.  

post #50 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by Currawong View Post
 

Here are some of my favourite books. I need to read more, but that will likely only happen if I fly more places. Most of the books I've read are fairly old, because they were on my parents' bookshelves. I sometimes wish I still had their collection, because it had many books there that you simply cannot get nowadays.

 

--

 

The entire Modesty Blaise series. Imagine a '70s James Bond character that does martial arts. If you can get hold of them, they are awesome and not just about fighting the bad guys, but the characters have a lot of character, depth and humour.

The Reginald Hill Dalziel & Pascoe detective series. It was made into a TV series that was as good as the books. 

The Winged Pharaoh. Recalled from her past life as a Pharaoh in Egypt, her story is beyond description other than to say they lived with a honesty, wisdom and nobility far beyond anything we have today.

Stalky & Co, by Rudyard Kipling. It is heading towards being a century old and requires regular checking of the notes as there is a lot of latin and literary references in there, but is a brilliant story of naughty schoolboys in a military prep school, based on Kipling's own experiences (if somewhat over the top compared to the actual reality).

 

What is special to me about the above books is that the "good guys", police or school boys regularly ponder the -- I don't want to say "morality" -- but what they feel is right or wrong about their actions, not just that of the "bad guys", teachers or criminals, or in the case of the Winged Pharaoh, she can see into people's hearts and how they are caught up in their culture or other troubles that makes them who they are, but likewise the other books have people who cannot be other than they are and that is why they do evil.

 

I'm also going to mention my father's book: Science, Myth or Magic? It was the compilation of what he gave as a series of radio talks on what science is really about. Not just important, but enjoyable to read, as he was a very good communicator. Note: If you buy it, I get a few cents, but that's not really why I had the publisher make a Kindle version.

Thanks Amos! I'm a 90% mystery 'who done it' reader. I've order a The Winged Pharaoh, a book or two from the Dalziel & Pascoe and Modesty Blaise series. 

 

Some of my favorite series are; Louise Penny's Inspector Gamache, Jack Reacher, Spencer, Jonathan and Faye Kellerman's Alex Delaware and Peter Decker, Jo Nesbo's Harry Hole, Steve Berry's Cotton Malone, Charles Finch's Charles Lenox, Alan Bradley's Flavia de Luce, and Daniele Silva's Gabriel Allon.

 

If I had to pick one to recommend it would be the Inspector Gamache series. The characters have depth, the picture Penny paints of the town of Three Pines is wonderful, and the who done it aspect is masterful.

post #51 of 54


Very nice, though some what disturbing read..

post #52 of 54
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Quinto View Post
 


Very nice, though some what disturbing read..

disturbing?

post #53 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

disturbing?


Yes, meaning the absolute power narcotics had over Evans and it ate him alive.. also the fact his former girlfriend jumped before the NY metro after he left her for Nanette, the waitress he met and married later on..

post #54 of 54
I read "The Stranger Beside Me" by Ann Rule. It was a well written true crime novel about Ted Bundy. Literally couldn't put it down. I have been on a true crime kick. Also "The Night stalker" about David Ramirez was chilling. After I read that book, I made sure my home was secure. I put up motion lights, put a film over the window in the front door, and now lock my garage door that leads into my home.

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