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post #31 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrathzombie View Post
 

The Bbooker winners that I have read are: 

 

V.S. Naipaul - In a free state ( This is quite good)

Salman Rushdie - Midnight's Children ( I have never liked Rushdie)

The Remains of the Day - Kazuo Ishigiro (I hate this book :))

Ben Okri - The Famished Road (Nice)

Michael Ondatjee - The English Patient (All I remember is that sex scene)

Roddy Doyle - Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha (Wonderful)

Ian Mcewan - Amsterdam (Nice)

Arundhati Roy - The God Of Small Things (It brings back feelings from Kerala)

J M Coetzee - Disgrace (Awesome)

Margaret Atwood - The Blind Assasin (I don't remember it now)

Yann Martel - Life Of Pi (Good)

DBC Pierre - Vernon God Little ( I liked it)

Kiran Desai - Inheritance of Loss( Lame)

Arvind Adiga - The White Tiger(Lame)

I have read 5 of those - coetzee-doyle-athwood-martel-pierre ¬

 

What would be your recommendation out of the ones left?

 

Hilary mantel's - Wolf Hall and Bring up the bodies are amazing. Every bit as good as "disgrace" although quiet different. She is working on the last book of the series and could very well be the first 3 time winner in the competitions history. They are must reads for any booker fans.  

post #32 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

I have read 5 of those - coetzee-doyle-athwood-martel-pierre ¬

 

What would be your recommendation out of the ones left?

 

Hilary mantel's - Wolf Hall and Bring up the bodies are amazing. Every bit as good as "disgrace" although quiet different. She is working on the last book of the series and could very well be the first 3 time winner in the competitions history. They are must reads for any booker fans.  

I have Hilary Mantel in my list. Not sure, when I am going to start.

 

If you are looking for prose quality, magic realism etc, you should definitely try Rushdie.  You will either say, Faaak!! this dude can write or WTF is this guy going on and on about. I think V S Naipaul writing creates the same mood that Coetzee does. 

post #33 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrathzombie View Post
 

I have Hilary Mantel in my list. Not sure, when I am going to start.

 

If you are looking for prose quality, magic realism etc, you should definitely try Rushdie.  You will either say, Faaak!! this dude can write or WTF is this guy going on and on about. I think V S Naipaul writing creates the same mood that Coetzee does. 

Sometimes i wonder how i have manged to read so many booker books and no Rushdie. 

 

Which would you recommend - "the satanic verses" or "midnight's children" ? As far as I know "midnight's Children" is supposed to be 

the more difficult piece, but nonetheless i would gravitate toward this work. It was recently awarded "best of the booker" 

 

Have you read the satanic verses? 

post #34 of 61

I've been on a nonfiction roll in the last five years, here in order are my 10 favorites

 

1. "Civil War" by Shelby Foote all three volumes and 2500 glorious pages, that reads so smoothly and beautifully I could not put it down.  The first volume "Fort Sumter to Perryville" took ten years to write and of course he did with an ink well and quill. The section about Abe Lincoln may be the single best reading experience of my life. 11/10

 

2. "Cosmos" Carl Sagan 9.5/10  10/10 reread X 3

 

3. "Into Thin Air" Jon Krakauer 10/10 reread X5

 

4. "Into The Wild" Jon Krakauer 9.5/10 reread X 3

 

5. "Tune In" Mark Lewison 9.5/10

 

6. "Moneyball" Michael Lewis 9/10

 

7. "Steve Jobs" Walter Isaacson 8.5/10

 

8.  "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" Rebecca Skloot 8/10

 

9. "A Clearing In the Distance (Frederick Law Olmsted and America in the 19th Century)" Witold Rybczynski 8/10

 

10."Eating The Dinosaur" Chuck Klosterman 8/10

post #35 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUMAY408 View Post
 

I've been on a nonfiction roll in the last five years, here in order are my 10 favorites

 

1. "Civil War" by Shelby Foote all three volumes and 2500 glorious pages, that reads so smoothly and beautifully I could not put it down.  The first volume "Fort Sumter to Perryville" took ten years to write and of course he did with an ink well and quill. The section about Abe Lincoln may be the single best reading experience of my life. 11/10

 

2. "Cosmos" Carl Sagan 9.5/10  10/10 reread X 3

 

3. "Into Thin Air" Jon Krakauer 10/10 reread X5

 

4. "Into The Wild" Jon Krakauer 9.5/10 reread X 3

 

5. "Tune In" Mark Lewison 9.5/10

 

6. "Moneyball" Michael Lewis 9/10

 

7. "Steve Jobs" Walter Isaacson 8.5/10

 

8.  "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" Rebecca Skloot 8/10

 

9. "A Clearing In the Distance (Frederick Law Olmsted and America in the 19th Century)" Witold Rybczynski 8/10

 

10."Eating The Dinosaur" Chuck Klosterman 8/10

great post Rumay - and i am delighted to say that i haven't read any of these. "civil war" will go on my must read list. thanks. I am gonna go look for it now. I wouldn't mind a nice hardback, must check amazon second hand, sometimes they have great deals on used hardbacks. I got a beautiful hardback of Walter Lippmann's "essays on the public philosophy" - printed 1955

post #36 of 61
Thread Starter 

wow - great price, for a new hardback edition. This could very well be my next buy - thanks again. :beerchug:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Civil-Boxed-American-Modern-Library/dp/0679643702/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1395712520&sr=1-1&keywords=Shelby+Foote

post #37 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

Sometimes i wonder how i have manged to read so many booker books and no Rushdie. 

 

Which would you recommend - "the satanic verses" or "midnight's children" ? As far as I know "midnight's Children" is supposed to be 

the more difficult piece, but nonetheless i would gravitate toward this work. It was recently awarded "best of the booker" 

 

Have you read the satanic verses? 

Yes I have. I have read quite a few Rushdie actually. Rushdie, usually takes historical happenings, facts, and twists and turns them by adding magic realism and surrealism. You could probably say, Gunter Grass does something similar in his books. Rushdie has a very good grasp of the English language. 

 

Grimus (I feel this is the most interesting work, you should check this out first) - Sci-fi and confusing..

Midnight's Children ( Historical Context: Indian Independence, British Colonialism, A lot from Indian politics)

Shame (Historical Context: Same as above, but looks at Pakistan)

The Satanic Verses ( The protagonist is based on famous Indian actors, when you read it you will not be able to understand what the controversy is about. You will probably have to search the internet to find that out :) )

Fury( I don't remember what happens)

Shalimar the Clown (I think this was about Kashmir)

post #38 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wrathzombie View Post
 

Yes I have. I have read quite a few Rushdie actually. Rushdie, usually takes historical happenings, facts, and twists and turns them by adding magic realism and surrealism. You could probably say, Gunter Grass does something similar in his books. Rushdie has a very good grasp of the English language. 

 

Grimus (I feel this is the most interesting work, you should check this out first) - Sci-fi and confusing..

Midnight's Children ( Historical Context: Indian Independence, British Colonialism, A lot from Indian politics)

Shame (Historical Context: Same as above, but looks at Pakistan)

The Satanic Verses ( The protagonist is based on famous Indian actors, when you read it you will not be able to understand what the controversy is about. You will probably have to search the internet to find that out :) )

Fury( I don't remember what happens)

Shalimar the Clown (I think this was about Kashmir)

I have to say that i do really enjoy historical fiction. Your description about history and magical realism reminds me of the work of Gabriel Garcia Marquez - "100 years of solitude". I hated that book. Everybody in it had the same name and it was really confusing. The last chapter was excellent but its not enough to carry the book. If "midnight's children" is anything like this i will probably hate it.

Here is to hoping that it isn't :beerchug: 

post #39 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

I have to say that i do really enjoy historical fiction. Your description about history and magical realism reminds me of the work of Gabriel Garcia Marquez - "100 years of solitude". I hated that book. Everybody in it had the same name and it was really confusing. The last chapter was excellent but its not enough to carry the book. If "midnight's children" is anything like this i will probably hate it.

Here is to hoping that it isn't :beerchug: 

100 years of solitude - You nailed it.. I think its quite similar...

post #40 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

wow - great price, for a new hardback edition. This could very well be my next buy - thanks again. :beerchug:

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Civil-Boxed-American-Modern-Library/dp/0679643702/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1395712520&sr=1-1&keywords=Shelby+Foote

The only comparison I could make is "The Rise and Fall Of The Third Reich" except 100X's better, Ken Burns based a good portion of his PBS series on these volumes.  The bloodiest and most significant war in US history was with itself.  Complex insight into the American character both good and bad.  The first 100 pages will grab you with the prose.  More Hemingway than Faulkner even though written by a southerner.

post #41 of 61
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUMAY408 View Post
 

The only comparison I could make is "The Rise and Fall Of The Third Reich" except 100X's better, Ken Burns based a good portion of his PBS series on these volumes.  The bloodiest and most significant war in US history was with itself.  Complex insight into the American character both good and bad.  The first 100 pages will grab you with the prose.  More Hemingway than Faulkner even though written by a southerner.

I love Hemingway. This intrigues me even more. Do you know if his fiction is good? I presume this is his masterpiece though. 

post #42 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

I love Hemingway. This intrigues me even more. Do you know if his fiction is good? I presume this is his masterpiece though. 

He wrote several fiction novels before his opus.  "Follow Me Down" and "Shiloh: A Novel" and later in life "September, September"

post #43 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

thanks for the input, i think i will leave it for a few weeks before i dip into them - they have big page counts don't they? I usually only do thousand pagers once a month more or less. 

 

I have a few long books on the list for this year ¬

 

Brandon sanderson - words of radiance (which i just finished)

fyodor dostoyevsky - the idiot 

fyodor dostoyevsky - brothers karamazov

David foster wallace - infinite jest 

 

 

I might try it before the Wallace book

They're not long and most are page turners you get through quickly.

I read Sanderson's mistborn trilogy recently, I thought it was okay. I grew up reading fantasy but these days I usually find it too formulaic and cliched. I finished wheel of time jjst because I had to, but man was that worse than poking out your eyes with a fork!

post #44 of 61

Here are some of my favourite books. I need to read more, but that will likely only happen if I fly more places. Most of the books I've read are fairly old, because they were on my parents' bookshelves. I sometimes wish I still had their collection, because it had many books there that you simply cannot get nowadays.

 

--

 

The entire Modesty Blaise series. Imagine a '70s James Bond character that does martial arts. If you can get hold of them, they are awesome and not just about fighting the bad guys, but the characters have a lot of character, depth and humour.

The Reginald Hill Dalziel & Pascoe detective series. It was made into a TV series that was as good as the books. 

The Winged Pharaoh. Recalled from her past life as a Pharaoh in Egypt, her story is beyond description other than to say they lived with a honesty, wisdom and nobility far beyond anything we have today.

Stalky & Co, by Rudyard Kipling. It is heading towards being a century old and requires regular checking of the notes as there is a lot of latin and literary references in there, but is a brilliant story of naughty schoolboys in a military prep school, based on Kipling's own experiences (if somewhat over the top compared to the actual reality).

 

What is special to me about the above books is that the "good guys", police or school boys regularly ponder the -- I don't want to say "morality" -- but what they feel is right or wrong about their actions, not just that of the "bad guys", teachers or criminals, or in the case of the Winged Pharaoh, she can see into people's hearts and how they are caught up in their culture or other troubles that makes them who they are, but likewise the other books have people who cannot be other than they are and that is why they do evil.

 

I'm also going to mention my father's book: Science, Myth or Magic? It was the compilation of what he gave as a series of radio talks on what science is really about. Not just important, but enjoyable to read, as he was a very good communicator. Note: If you buy it, I get a few cents, but that's not really why I had the publisher make a Kindle version.

post #45 of 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by magiccabbage View Post
 

 

  I am a very harsh marker, I will very rarely give a book more than 8.5. Nothing will get a 10

 

  1. Leo Tolstoy - war and peace                    9.8

 

My favorite writer Leo Tolstoy. Among Russian writers he is losing lately to Dostoevsky and Nabokov in popularity in the West, it seems. 

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