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DIY Cable Gallery!! - Page 845

post #12661 of 14091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Armaegis View Post

Are those the neutrik locking plugs? I've always been curious about those. 

The right angle ones are switchcraft and the regular ones are neutrik.  All from redco.

post #12662 of 14091
A little IC for the AUX in on my car, Mogami & Neutrik
bu6ypape.jpg

Sent from my HTC Desire HD A9191 using Tapatalk 2
post #12663 of 14091

My first ever DIY cable, a LOD for my ipod. Not very pretty but it's learning experience. Most important it has sound. normal_smile%20.gif

 

post #12664 of 14091

 

need help to my first complex iem cable project.  What I try to do is make a semi universal iem cable that will enable me to use it with more than one iem.  Also, I like the idea of detachable cable at around the chest area(like Shure SE530).  So far I have been studying on parts needed to achieve this goal.  However, I still couldn't find the JH/westone style plug that will fit the JH16A(the one with JH-3A system)  I need exact jack type that they have with the stock cable as it needs to be plugged in side by side of another jack. 

 

This is what I need help of:

 

1. I still couldn't find the pin out diagram for the termination for JH16A with 8-pin mini-XLR.(termination of the first cable that connect to JH16A

2. the pin out for bottom part where the 8-pin mini-XLR to 3.5mm adapter cable.

 

Once I know this the pin out for 8-pin mini-XLR on the TG334 should be very simple as I can just separate it from 2 wire left and 2 wire right to match with the JH16A pin out.

 

 

 

Also, do you think this cable will work out ok? or will it degraded the signal quality since there are a few connectors and jacks?

 

Hope to hear from you guys

 

Thank you very much

 

Dan

post #12665 of 14091
Quote:
Originally Posted by danpong View Post

 

need help to my first complex iem cable project. [snip]

 

 

Hi, we have another thread where your question might receive a better response.  This thread was designed to be a gallery thread for members to provide pictures of their craft work so we could observe the creative cables that were made.

 

Here is the thread designed for questions: http://www.head-fi.org/t/676402/diy-cable-questions-and-comments-thread

post #12666 of 14091

Alright, so i've been lurking this post for way too long and have spent a proportional amount of money. My cables didn't start up to par but... here goes.

 

Some of my first cables used techflex.

APZN88Yh.jpg

Cable: Canare L-4E5C

Plug: Rean NYS231BG

 

This cable used to be on my Sony MDR-V6's, I have now recabled some iFrogz custom headphones which have been discontinued and I can't find the actual name of them.

 

then I got new material and recabled them again..As well as make a 1/4th inch to 1/8th extension cable and an aux cable.

 

C71Ktwjh.jpg

 

fVB63Uhh.jpg

 

Cable: Canare L-4E5C

1/4th in plug: Neutrik NP3X-B X-Series

1/8th in jack: Rean NYS240BG

Right Angle 1/8th in plugs: Neutrik NTP3RC

Straight: 1/8th in plugs: Rean NYS231

 

These cable were first sheathed poorly with techflex and frayed. Then I re sleeved it with new techflex and properly cut it with heat.

 

Then I started experimenting with paracord..

 

LzCKf3Dh.jpg

 

I resleeved the cable on my MDR-V6's with paracord. 

 

MY0evBUh.jpg

 

7ys5xPHh.jpg

 

 

 

Cable: Combination of last 2 and 

Jack: Same as above (very favorable towards these plugs, highly recommended if you don't need to lock)

Right Angle Plug: Switchcraft 35HDRABAU (These are very expensive from redco.. $8.50 a pc not exactly sure why)

Straight Plugs: Canare F-12 (I LOVE these. they are GORGEOUS and easy to solder)

Paracord: Type III 550lb; Color: Black Widow

Note about heat shrink sizing. The 3/8th in heat shrink JUST fits over rean plugs which are slim as it is. 1/2th fts over most plugs.. I just wish I had bought some 3:1 instead of 2:1 as rarely will your cables be 1/8th thickness; especially if you are using paracord.. 

 

Now my latest cables and first experiment with XLR. These are designed to be used at home with my M50's and is pretty microphonic due to the braid. The braid has 1 wire in each paracord. I tried to use Type 1 Paracord but it just wouldn't go through and ended up fraying. The paper clip technique helped a lot but didn't know how to attach it to the wire.

 

GEzAUDZh.jpg

 

wZnIyFQh.jpg

 

Braided Cable: Mogami W2534 Other Cable is same as top.

XLR Plugs: Neutrik NC3MXX-B

1/8th in Plug: Rean NYS240BG Not a fan of these. They don't look as sleek as the Rean's

 

In general, it is way easier to work with the wires in paracord because with the stock bulk cable, it was very hard to slide the sleeves of the jacks up and down (specifically the REAN plugs). This resulted in a lot of wasted plugs for me as I would have to exert so much force to slide the sleeve down that sometimes I pulled too hard and the actual plug came off.

 

Also, I've had some funny conection problems where stray strands can sometimes come in contact with others. To solve this as well as add some more stress relief, I have filled the plugs with hot glue before putting the sleeves on. It makes them way more stable electrically and mechanically.

 

Hope you enjoyed. More materials are on the way so probably more pictures soon. Full album: http://imgur.com/a/q7wbV


Edited by FrozenPanda - 8/19/13 at 6:13am
post #12667 of 14091

All the pics are in order from oldest to most recent, correct? I can see the quality of cable improving as I scroll. Haha Nice looking stuff though. 

post #12668 of 14091
In general yeah. I resleeved some as noted. The first picture, the ysplit was put in after so it has some of the old and new.

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post #12669 of 14091
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrozenPanda View Post

 

In general, it is way easier to work with the wires in paracord because with the stock bulk cable, it was very hard to slide the sleeves of the jacks up and down. This resulted in a lot of wasted plugs for me as I would have to exert so much force to slide the sleeve down that sometimes I pulled too hard and the actual plug came off. Also, I've had some funny conection problems where stray strands can sometimes come in contact with others. To solve this as well as add some more stress relief, I have filled the plugs with hot glue before putting the sleeves on. It makes them way more stable electrically and mechanically.

 

Lol. You're doing it so, so wrong homie.

post #12670 of 14091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Circuitbender View Post

 

Lol. You're doing it so, so wrong homie.

When you're done being a jerk would you care to explain?

post #12671 of 14091
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrozenPanda View Post

When you're done being a jerk would you care to explain?

Yes you shouldn't have to exert that much force to get the sleeve onto the wire. If you have to than you are not putting it on correctly.  If you do it right the techflex or paracord should kind slide on there.  Also breaking the wires and connectors that you soldered on there is pretty impressive...it takes a bit of strength.  Also the reason you are having electrical connectivity problems are becasue you are messing up the connection by pulling too hard.  

 

But good job on the wires they look very very nice.  


Edited by Zashoomin - 8/18/13 at 10:53pm
post #12672 of 14091

Portable cable to go with re-socketed kns6400. 24G silicone cca wire with neutrik jacks, one filed down to fit an otterbox armour. This cable was more work than the average; being industrial hi-temp wire it was stamped with gauge and temp rating every few inches. I removed that with acetone aka nail polish remover then the cleanness made it extremely tangle happy when I braided it. Despite that this is a gorgeous cable to use, its the exact length I want and the silicone makes it so flexible and kink resistant. I am so happy with; it totally worth the wait and effort. Next cable projects: Silicone micro-micro otg cable then a removable mod for the Beyer 300p I have coming in the mail.

post #12673 of 14091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zashoomin View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by FrozenPanda View Post

When you're done being a jerk would you care to explain?

Yes you shouldn't have to exert that much force to get the sleeve onto the wire. If you have to than you are not putting it on correctly.  If you do it right the techflex or paracord should kind slide on there.  Also breaking the wires and connectors that you soldered on there is pretty impressive...it takes a bit of strength.  Also the reason you are having electrical connectivity problems are becasue you are messing up the connection by pulling too hard.  

 

But good job on the wires they look very very nice.  


Heh, sorry. Zashoomin is correct. The whole point of braided sleeving like that is that it takes zero force to insert wire. The braiding is not for looks, it's made to be expandable. You're supposed to push the sleeving to expand it and form a bubble. Insert your cable and grab the end through the sleeving. Let the end of the sleeving go and it'll contract over the cable. Then you use an inchworm technique to sort of inch the wire into the sleeving, scootching it by forming a bubble and then releasing the other side. I'm sure there are videos on YouTube, just look up computer cable sleeving guide or something. Somewhat time-consuming and/or tedious, but definitely not difficult in any respect, and very clean and professional-looking when done correctly.

post #12674 of 14091

 

In general, it is way easier to work with the wires in paracord because with the stock bulk cable, it was very hard to slide the sleeves of the jacks up and down. This resulted in a lot of wasted plugs for me as I would have to exert so much force to slide the sleeve down that sometimes I pulled too hard and the actual plug came off. Also, I've had some funny conection problems where stray strands can sometimes come in contact with others. To solve this as well as add some more strain relief, I have filled the plugs with hot glue before putting the sleeves on. It makes them way more stable electrically and mechanically.

 

Hope you enjoyed. More materials are on the way so probably more pictures soon. Full album: http://imgur.com/a/q7wbV

Sorry, perhaps my grammar isn't too specific. I think the misconception here is that I required a lot of force to get the sleeving on whether it was techflex or paracord. Yeah no, techflex slides on like a charm and could be "wormed" about 6 -9 inches at a time. Paracord however needed to be inched 1/2 to 1 inch at a time. Definitely grab a movie to relieve the tediousness.

 

I was referring to the sleeves of the jacks. The Rean NYS231BG plugs have a diameter that is just enough or possibly a bit smaller than the diameter of canare cable. Therefore, you have the hole of the plug sleeve compressing the cable and when sliding back and forth it would be shaving the shielding of the cable. This became very unsightly and it required a lot more effort to keep it clean. Hence the fact which I much prefer working with paracord now because the cable loses that large diameter and is basically just the width of the wire braid. For bigger jacks such as the canare or switchcraft which have a larger diameter for cables, I would recon its not as much of a problem, but I prefer the look and feel of paracord over techflex anyways. 

 

Now, the hot glue was to prevent the stray strands that sometimes occurred when stripping the wire from ever possibly coming into contact with each other. It also allowed me to secure the end of the paracord with hot glue as the crimp strain relief would not likely be tight enough to hold on to the paracord. This was more important for the canare plugs as I did not want to use heat shrink to hold the paracord/techflex in place.

 

I think I cleared up the conclusion?

post #12675 of 14091
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrozenPanda View Post

Sorry, perhaps my grammar isn't too specific. I think the misconception here is that I required a lot of force to get the sleeving on whether it was techflex or paracord. Yeah no, techflex slides on like a charm and could be "wormed" about 6 -9 inches at a time. Paracord however needed to be inched 1/2 to 1 inch at a time. Definitely grab a movie to relieve the tediousness.

 

I was referring to the sleeves of the jacks. The Rean NYS231BG plugs have a diameter that is just enough or possibly a bit smaller than the diameter of canare cable. Therefore, you have the hole of the plug sleeve compressing the cable and when sliding back and forth it would be shaving the shielding of the cable. This became very unsightly and it required a lot more effort to keep it clean. Hence the fact which I much prefer working with paracord now because the cable loses that large diameter and is basically just the width of the wire braid. For bigger jacks such as the canare or switchcraft which have a larger diameter for cables, I would recon its not as much of a problem, but I prefer the look and feel of paracord over techflex anyways. 

 

Now, the hot glue was to prevent the stray strands that sometimes occurred when stripping the wire from ever possibly coming into contact with each other. It also allowed me to secure the end of the paracord with hot glue as the crimp strain relief would not likely be tight enough to hold on to the paracord. This was more important for the canare plugs as I did not want to use heat shrink to hold the paracord/techflex in place.

 

I think I cleared up the conclusion?

Ya I got you.  Ya I know the feeling but I would suggest that you get larger connectors next time instead of trying to force it.  And hot glue works wonderfully as you pointed out in many situations but if you make a mistake or want to take off the connector you are going to have many many problems so I would not suggest it in the future.  

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