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How do I setup a podcast with multiple guests? So that each guest has his own mic?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I'm going to layout a problem I have, and I need help from educated musicians, radio hosts, and podcasters to tell me what I need to have to fix this problem.

Scenario: I have 3 microphones, 3 headphones, and 3 guests. Each guest has his own microphone and his own headphone (so that the guest can hear his own voice). Everyone is located in the same room.

Problem: How do I set this up in a way that all 3 guests can hear each other through their headphones? What equipment is needed.
I may also want a multi-track recorder. If I did get one, how would it play into effect? What do I need, and what plugs into what?


Please help me fix this issue so that I can start my podcast!


Edited by WaldoJones - 3/23/14 at 3:17pm
post #2 of 7
Thread Starter 

Hello? Anybody? I really need help getting this setup, I have no idea where to start.

post #3 of 7

You need a mixing board that will accommodate all the I/Os you need. There may be a bit of a learning curve but that's the only way I can see to do it. I've always liked Mackie products so I'd start looking there. There may be cheaper options but their components have always seemed very high quality. Depending on the model of mixer you should have your option of output choices to run to some kind of headphone hub. Not sure on the headphone output options on these mixers, maybe there's one with multiple headphone outs.... I dunno

 

That's the way I'd go. Inputs=> Mixer=>Headphone hub=> your earballs.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
 
Originally Posted by benthughes View Post
 

You need a mixing board that will accommodate all the I/Os you need. There may be a bit of a learning curve but that's the only way I can see to do it. I've always liked Mackie products so I'd start looking there. There may be cheaper options but their components have always seemed very high quality. Depending on the model of mixer you should have your option of output choices to run to some kind of headphone hub. Not sure on the headphone output options on these mixers, maybe there's one with multiple headphone outs.... I dunno

 

That's the way I'd go. Inputs=> Mixer=>Headphone hub=> your earballs.

So... Microphones > Mixer > Headphone Amplifier?  > Everyone's Headphones?

 

Is there anything else I need to know? What's compression? And I keep hearing something about audio conversion, but they're not referring to the audio files.

post #5 of 7

Allrighty... In terms of audio conversion, what they may mean is taking the analog signal... your voice into the mics, into the mixer, out to your headphones. That's all an analog signal. To record you'll need to record it in a digital format you'll need to shoot it into a program to record it like Garageband or something. Not sure if that's what they mean but you're going to make what's going into the microphones digital to upload it to your podcast. How you do that is up to you.

 

Compression. The easiest way to put it is that compression makes loud bits quieter and quiet bits louder. You can modify the amount of compression you use to get a desired effect. An example as a guitarist/bassist is that I'd use compression to make harmonics or quieter techniques more emphasized or when switching from clean to distortion use compression to make the recording more uniform and not blow your ass out. In basically compresses the dynamic range. I'm not sure how useful it'd be in a podcast... Maybe to decrease volume spikes associated with "P" or such sounds. Individual volume discrepancies can be adjusted at the mixer. 

 

When getting into recording, using mixers, digital music recording and editing there is a bit of a learning curve even for something as straight forward as a podcast. Do some research and have fun!

post #6 of 7

I just re-read my post... sorry it sounds rambly, I'm kinda sick right meow and would rather apologize than edit for clarity.

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by benthughes View Post
 

Allrighty... In terms of audio conversion, what they may mean is taking the analog signal... your voice into the mics, into the mixer, out to your headphones. That's all an analog signal. To record you'll need to record it in a digital format you'll need to shoot it into a program to record it like Garageband or something. Not sure if that's what they mean but you're going to make what's going into the microphones digital to upload it to your podcast. How you do that is up to you.

 

Compression. The easiest way to put it is that compression makes loud bits quieter and quiet bits louder. You can modify the amount of compression you use to get a desired effect. An example as a guitarist/bassist is that I'd use compression to make harmonics or quieter techniques more emphasized or when switching from clean to distortion use compression to make the recording more uniform and not blow your ass out. In basically compresses the dynamic range. I'm not sure how useful it'd be in a podcast... Maybe to decrease volume spikes associated with "P" or such sounds. Individual volume discrepancies can be adjusted at the mixer. 

 

When getting into recording, using mixers, digital music recording and editing there is a bit of a learning curve even for something as straight forward as a podcast. Do some research and have fun!


Thank you very much. You really cleared compression up nicely. It's essentially a type of range or limit? All sounds can't pass this range because they'll be reduced or eliminated?

 

Here is what the other guy said:

Quote:
 I use the analog to digital sound converter in my Mac. If you have a PC, chances are you'll need either an external A/D converter such as the Behringer UCA-202 that I have..
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