Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Headphones for $200 or under
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Headphones for $200 or under

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

Hi, I will soon be purchasing a new set of headphones. These will be my first decent set of headphones, as up until now I have been using just whatever I had lying around. These will be used for listening to music (Metal, Punk, Rock, things of that sort), playing games, and just general use with movies and TV shows. For the most part these will be used with my phone, tablet, laptop, and desktop. The desktop doesn't have a dedicated sound card, if that counts for anything. My budget is $200. I have a few more requirements, like I need them to be somewhat aesthetically pleasing, comfortable, straight cable (I strongly dislike coiled cables for some reason), and somewhat portable (I don't need them to be super compact, but small enough for me to shove them in a backpack). I would like the advice of someone with more experience with audio than myself, as this is something I know next to nothing about. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!


Edited by mmueller1 - 3/22/14 at 8:49pm
post #2 of 20

1. Do you wear glasses?

 

2. Are you going to listen to the headphones in public area and/or quiet area like an library?

post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 

I do wear glasses, and from time to time they will be used in a library.

post #4 of 20

For your budget, AT M50 or Shure SRH-840 would fit, but you are wearing glasses; they can be uncomfortable very quickly depend on size of your head. If you can give up mobility and public listening, open-aire headphones like Grado SR-225 would fit too.

 

Do not worry about external soundcard or DAC yet..... for that price range, there is few reason to worry about DAC and/or amplification. Very simple stuffs like this ( http://www.turtlebeach.com/product-detail/sound-cards-accessories/micro-ii/31 ) is sufficient. Not to mention it will be probably sound better than internal onboard soundcard on your desktop since it does not get interference from a power supply.

 

I also sent you a private message.

post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 

I can give up quite a bit of mobility, I just need them to still be a somewhat manageable. If it were to mean more comfortable/ better sounding headphones, I would gladly give up portability.

post #6 of 20

Sennheiser HD 595

 

$186.77 on Amazon. Very highly-regarded around here and in-general. The aesthetics may be iffy, some people like it and some don't. I personally like them

http://www.amazon.com/Sennheiser-Headphones-Burl-Wood-Accents/dp/B0042A8CW2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1395548303&sr=8-2&keywords=sennheiser

 

Beyerdynamic DT-880 Pro Headphones (250 Ohm)

$197.95 on Amazon as well. I think they look nice. But you will absolutely need a good DAC/AMP or sound card to drive these, especially since they're 250 ohms. They're also made in Germany. Also a very highly regarded headphone. It competes with headphones that cost $400-$600

http://www.amazon.com/Beyerdynamic-DT-880-Pro-Headphones-250/dp/B001B1QENY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1395548706&sr=8-1&keywords=dt880

 

AKG Q 701 Quincy Jones Signature Reference-Class Premium Headphones - Black

$199.99 on Amazon. They look nice, perform extremely well according to both reviews on here and Amazon. Also famous for requiring extensive burn-in.

http://www.amazon.com/AKG-Signature-Reference-Class-Premium-Headphones/dp/B004444OFK/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1395548814&sr=8-1&keywords=701

 

 

Note that these are all open-acoustic headphones, which means that they WILL leak sound at almost any volume level. They're all meant for at-home listening and are no way portable or on-the-go. The advantage of open-acoustic designed headphones is the sound quality. More accurate and much more "airy" and realistic than closed headphones.

 

I don't know of hardly any closed headphones if that's what you're looking for sorry.


Edited by Joshua277456 - 3/22/14 at 9:32pm
post #7 of 20

Yeah, all of them above are excellent headphones... except they are all open-aire, which are unsuitable for commune/quiet area listening.

post #8 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmueller1 View Post
 

I can give up quite a bit of mobility, I just need them to still be a somewhat manageable. If it were to mean more comfortable/ better sounding headphones, I would gladly give up portability.


Like I said. You will not regret the open-acoustic design of the headphones I've listed.

 

If I were you, get a good pair of open cans, and then get a good pair of closed cans when you have the money.

 

The DT880s are extremely comfortable from what I've heard and read. One guy writing an Amazon review said that it felt like two pillows resting on his head.

 

As far as hardware setup, if you're going to be listening music from your computer, depending on your motherboard's integrated audio solution, the cans are going to sound okay. It is kind of a waste to buy expensive cans ($200+) and not have a good DAC (digital-to-analog-converter) and amplifier to properly drive them. If you want I can recommend several options, such as DAC/AMP combos and sound cards.

post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 

I tend to avoid people when listening to music in public anyways, I'm sure it won't be a huge difference. I really don't like the color that the Sennheiser 598s come in. I'm really looking for sound quality above all else. My only qualm with the DT 880s are the cable. I have not had much experience with coiled cables, however I don't feel it's something I'd enjoy. At the same time though, almost all of the reviews are fantastic. Are there any noticeable downsides of having coiled cable over a straight one, and is it something that is easy to get used to?

post #10 of 20

DT880 are extremely comfortable. Just make sure wash the pads when they get dirty. and replace them when inside materials have been degraded. They will last very long.

 

The problem is that impedance.. I am not sure if you can get 32ohm version under 200.

 

While HD598's color is rather embarrassing, there are few headphones that can beat 598 in terms of sound quality and comfort. Unlike DT880, you can also replace the cable in case it is cut or damaged (which is a huge plus for maintaining the headphones)

 

Avoid coiled cable. They are simply annoyance unless used in recording studios where a lot of inattention-related accidents happen.


Edited by wnmnkh - 3/22/14 at 9:50pm
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmueller1 View Post
 

I tend to avoid people when listening to music in public anyways, I'm sure it won't be a huge difference. I really don't like the color that the Sennheiser 598s come in. I'm really looking for sound quality above all else. My only qualm with the DT 880s are the cable. I have not had much experience with coiled cables, however I don't feel it's something I'd enjoy. At the same time though, almost all of the reviews are fantastic. Are there any noticeable downsides of having coiled cable over a straight one, and is it something that is easy to get used to?


The thing about open cans, they will leak sound more than you might think, especially if you've never used high-end open cans. You might be in for a surprise. I can almost guarantee it will annoy other people if you have open cans at all in a public place.

 

As far as I know there is no sound degradation when it comes to coiled cables. They will sound the same as straight cables as long as the cable is well-made and has good insulation.

 

I have never really messed with coiled cables so I can't say if they're easy to get used to. But I imagine it depends on your outlook on them. I don't think I could ever get used to them, but that's just me, hence the reason I've never messed with them.

post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by wnmnkh View Post
 

DT880 are extremely comfortable. Just make sure wash the pads when they get dirty. and replace them when inside materials have been degraded. They will last very long.

 

The problem is that impedance.. I am not sure if you can get 32ohm version under 200.

 

While HD598's color is rather embarrassing, there are few headphones that can beat 598 in terms of sound quality and comfort. Unlike DT880, you can also replace the cable in case it is cut or damaged (which is a huge plus for maintaining the headphones)

 

Avoid coiled cable. They are simply annoyance unless used in recording studios where a lot of inattention-related accidents happen.


Yeah that's one thing that sucks with the DT880s is that you can't, at least not on Amazon, get them for less than $200 unless you get the 250ohm pros

post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 

I really don't think that the sound leaking will make a huge difference, as a majority of the time they will not be in a public environment, however you guys now a LOT more about this than I do. WN, you did bring up another point when talking about the replaceable cable of the 598s. I tend to treat the products I own with quite a lot of care, however I have had headphone cables break on me. I don't think having a replaceable cable is really necessary to me, however I would at the very least like to have a pretty durable cable if I can't replace it. Either of these two features would be a definite pro on a pair of headphones. If you guys do have any more suggestions, please let me know. Thanks

post #14 of 20
I would like to bring some closed on ears in the mix. Amperiors can be had for $160 at amazon currently and they can be easily driven without an amp from any source. They seal well, sound great and are stylish too... Every single piece of them is replaceable and they are very sturdy.

If I were you, I would go for them. I have them and the HD598 ( and the DT880) and I only take my Amperiors (or HD25-1) out of the house.

Cheers,
K
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 

Anybody know if the Beyerdynamic Custom One Pros are any good? I really like the look of them, however I don't know how quality is.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Headphones for $200 or under