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Light Harmonic Geek Out EM/1000 Impressions Thread - Page 35

post #511 of 2304
Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjazz View Post


it's a truly sad sight hanging droopily by its dongle/cable, LOL biggrin.gif


Maybe it needs to visit the Healthy Man site for another type of PERK. 

post #512 of 2304

Here's my take on the volume control:

 

Use ONLY the buttons, or ONLY the computer to control the volume, not both. I use only my computer, so there wont be any accidents.

post #513 of 2304

^ Thanks for this, Currawong.  It's certainly an easy rule to follow, but what's your take on operating at less than maximum bit depth - especially with 16-bit files?  

 

I'm completely open-minded, here - respectfully seeking your advice, as I know that even 16-bit allows a dynamic range of 98 dB, vs. 144 dB for 24-bit - but I've never been able to get a handle on why a lot of people argue that you don't want to reduce the 16-bit dynamic range, especially.  

 

In other words, how much reduction in bit depth is too much?

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

post #514 of 2304
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilch0md View Post
 

^ Thanks for this, Currawong.  It's certainly an easy rule to follow, but what's your take on operating at less than maximum bit depth - especially with 16-bit files?  

 

I'm completely open-minded, here - respectfully seeking your advice, as I know that even 16-bit allows a dynamic range of 98 dB, vs. 144 dB for 24-bit - but I've never been able to get a handle on why a lot of people argue that you don't want to reduce the 16-bit dynamic range, especially.  

 

In other words, how much reduction in bit depth is too much?

 

Thanks,

 

Mike

Digging around since I was worried about this earlier, I found this again on the Kickstarter campaign website:  

 

  • Volume control: two buttons and software (Operation System main volume slider sends volume data to Geek which implements the volume change in its internal volume control)

You are using the digital volume control of the ESS chipset whether you use the buttons or not.  Currawong's advice is really the only needed at this point.  Choose one or the other and stick with it.  I would add not plugging and unplugging constantly since that is just asking for an accidental button press or hiccup from the OS.

post #515 of 2304

And for the extender comments, the one we got with the Geek Out isn't anything special (not based on their Lightspeed stuff), so any cheapy that is oriented properly or the proper length for your needs will not likely be a step up or down in quality from the one you have.  I will be building my own soon and will post a tutorial for those interested in making their own like I did with my micro USB OTG cable.  Check the DIY subforum in a couple weeks.

post #516 of 2304
I've been skipping this conversation the entire time...what's the problem with the volume control? It isn't unusual for Windows to reset the volume for things, it happens to me all the time with my ODAC, or headphones, or on-board laptop speakers in use and it's annoying as heck. However, since the Geek Out was meant to be controlled by the computer's volume, which I think is a very appropriate method to control the volume, then it makes perfect sense that the volume will randomly reset too, no?

Mac OS has this problem too sometimes, but I find that it remembers volume settings much more reliably than Windows, which is also probably why people with Macs aren't complaining as much.
post #517 of 2304

Only one time that it reseted to max when I touched the volume buttons (which could be remedied by a firmware update).

 

After that I haven't touched the volume buttons....all through OS volume control (like Currawong had said).

My system (Win7 x64 Ult.) always remember my last volume settings. 

And I like it!

post #518 of 2304

^ If we combine Currawong's advice with m-i-c-k-e-y's, we end up with only one way to avoid excessive volume:  Never touch the buttons on the Geek Out. 

post #519 of 2304
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilch0md View Post
 

^ If we combine Currawong's advice with m-i-c-k-e-y's, we end up with only one way to avoid excessive volume:  Never touch the buttons on the Geek Out. 

Once you hit a button for the first time, it jumps to max volume, but then you can turn it down via the buttons.  So the very first time, don't plug your headphones in until you reduce the volume.

post #520 of 2304
The problem is that the buttons are more than volume control. They activate/deactivate the 3D feature. So not touching them is a poor remedy.
post #521 of 2304

First thing I do is turn the 3D on.  Then I don't touch it.  :wink_face:

Reply
post #522 of 2304
Ok, so please feel free to help me edit these instructions for safely using the Geek Out:

1) Unplug headphones from the GO.
2) Attach the GO to USB port of Mac or PC.
3) Confirm power LED is lit on the GO.
4) Increase system volume to 100% (for maximum bit depth).
5) Press both GO buttons if 3D is desired.
6) Press and hold the GO's down volume button for a few seconds (?)
7) Plug in your headphones.
8) Start playing music.
9) Put on your headphones.
10) Press the GO's up volume button to desired level.

To toggle 3D (on or off), unplug headphones and go back to step 5.

Does this make sense?
post #523 of 2304
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilch0md View Post

Ok, so please feel free to help me edit these instructions for safely using the Geek Out:

1) Unplug headphones from the GO.
2) Attach the GO to USB port of Mac or PC.
3) Confirm power LED is lit on the GO.
4) Increase system volume to 100% (for maximum bit depth).
5) Press both GO buttons if 3D is desired.
6) Press and hold the GO's down volume button for a few seconds (?)
7) Plug in your headphones.
8) Start playing music.
9) Put on your headphones.
10) Press the GO's up volume button to desired level.

To toggle 3D (on or off), unplug headphones and go back to step 5.

Does this make sense?

 

 

Under Windows 8.1 with the first version of the driver (not sure if they have released another or not) using either Foobar or Jriver...the pressing the buttons together for 3D would never affect volume. It is the same under Linux and Mac for me. Setting 3D never affects volume whether driving from the GO or software. 

 

My GO has just an okay fit in the USB port of my lappy, just a little loose. Any looser and I could see where power might get interupted pressing the buttons and which would reset the volume. 


Could this be what is happening to people or are they under a different version of Window which may react differently?

post #524 of 2304
Quote:
Originally Posted by CEE TEE View Post
 

First thing I do is turn the 3D on.  Then I don't touch it.  :wink_face:

 

So you pretty much never have the 3D off? That's high praise for a crossfeed circuit. And excellent news, as I enjoy a well executed crossfeed.

post #525 of 2304
Quote:
Originally Posted by zilch0md View Post

Ok, so please feel free to help me edit these instructions for safely using the Geek Out:

1) Unplug headphones from the GO.
2) Attach the GO to USB port of Mac or PC.
3) Confirm power LED is lit on the GO.
4) Increase system volume to 100% (for maximum bit depth).
5) Press both GO buttons if 3D is desired.
6) Press and hold the GO's down volume button for a few seconds (?)
7) Plug in your headphones.
8) Start playing music.
9) Put on your headphones.
10) Press the GO's up volume button to desired level.

To toggle 3D (on or off), unplug headphones and go back to step 5.

Does this make sense?

Once you start using the buttons for volume control it shouldn't jump anymore even if you turn the 3d on and off.
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