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Light Harmonic Geek Out EM/1000 Impressions Thread - Page 9

post #121 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillhart View Post

 

Well it's certainly cheaper than asking price.  Whether it's worth it seems to be unknown as there isn't much real-world info on it yet...

 

I'll say if I didn't already have a 1000 of my own coming I'd buy it.

post #122 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxelCloris View Post
 

 

I'll say if I didn't already have a 1000 of my own coming I'd buy it.

I almost jumped on it myself, but I don't need a 1000.  My 450 (whenever it arrives) will already be more power than I need (wish I knew they were going to do an IEM specific one earlier).

post #123 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by FraGGleR View Post
 

The first couple reviews seem to show it is worth it.  Beating out a Microstreamer and holding its own with a Herus is a very good start.

A couple good reviews and one for sale by owner after being used once.  That's not a great percentage.  ;)

 

I'm not trying to rain on anybody's parade, I'm just trying to keep a cool head amidst the hype and look at it objectively.  I strongly suspect that I'll be kicking myself when more and more units hit the streets, but I think holding off is the right decision FOR ME right now.  YMMV.  :D

post #124 of 1158
That's true. From the current asking price though, $200 for a $300 device isn't too shabby.
post #125 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by miceblue View Post

That's true. From the current asking price though, $200 for a $300 device isn't too shabby.

 

Every item on Amazon has a high price crossed out and a low price next to it.  It's called price anchoring and it's a psychological trick to make you think you are getting a better deal than you are.  The value of an item has nothing to do with its MSRP.  In time, we'll know if $200 is a steal for the buyer or the seller.

 

Remember, the $250 Audioquest Dragonfly 1.0 is now $99 (60% cheaper).  Is the price now REALLY good or was the price then REALLY bad?

 

Sorry, maybe I'm just in a depressing mood.  But it seems really difficult to determine the value of the device when it's not widely in use yet.

 

EDIT - Just to clarify, I don't mean to rain on anybody's parade.  If you think it's totally worth it, by all means go for it.  Hopefully you can post some thorough impressions for the rest of us.  :D


Edited by Stillhart - 4/1/14 at 7:09pm
post #126 of 1158
Amazon usually doesn't have a 33% markdown price on a just-released product though. Maybe in a year or two they will, but not right when it's first launched. The DragonFly 1.0 was released how long ago again?

Besides, if Amazon did do that, the backers and people who paid $199 for the Geek 450 would be seriously pissed off and boycott Light Harmonic for scamming. XD
Edited by miceblue - 4/1/14 at 8:32pm
post #127 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by FraGGleR View Post
 

I almost jumped on it myself, but I don't need a 1000.  My 450 (whenever it arrives) will already be more power than I need (wish I knew they were going to do an IEM specific one earlier).

 

It's something they decided to do only recently, after comments that the 1000 was way too powerful for IEM and that the 450 may still be too strong. I believe that's why they're sending out the test units before proceeding; not because they're unsure if it will work properly but rather they're unsure that it will be well received by the community who primarily use IEMs.

post #128 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stillhart View Post
 

A couple good reviews and one for sale by owner after being used once.  That's not a great percentage.  ;)

 

I'm not trying to rain on anybody's parade, I'm just trying to keep a cool head amidst the hype and look at it objectively.  I strongly suspect that I'll be kicking myself when more and more units hit the streets, but I think holding off is the right decision FOR ME right now.  YMMV.  :D

 

Interesting conversation. I looked at the referenced for-sale ad that was posted here. The given reason for the sale is that the seller decided to go with a Cipher Theorem portable DAC instead, because he can use it with his iPod. (The Geek Out 1000 draws too much current for an iPod.) The MSRP for the Cipher Theorem is $899 and you can find it selling for $799 on Amazon, so I think using that ad to infer very much about the quality of the Geek Out relative to its price is a stretch.

 

PS - I'm not at all trying to question the decision you made for yourself.  I'm a big advocate for caution - maybe too much so.


Edited by ed45 - 4/1/14 at 9:28pm
post #129 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxelCloris View Post
 

It's something they decided to do only recently, after comments that the 1000 was way too powerful for IEM 

 

How so?

post #130 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sinocelt View Post

 

How so?

 

The worry was that people were adjusting volume on the GO, then if the computer changed volume the GO went back to max volume and completely blasted the ears of whoever was listening. This was recreated on the GO 1000 by multiple people. So by reducing the power output there's a lower dB level coming from the headphones if that occurs, saving your hearing.

post #131 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxelCloris View Post
 

The worry was that people were adjusting volume on the GO, then if the computer changed volume the GO went back to max volume and completely blasted the ears of whoever was listening. This was recreated on the GO 1000 by multiple people. So by reducing the power output there's a lower dB level coming from the headphones if that occurs, saving your hearing.

 

Egads! :eek: This issue needs to be addressed! I'm currently using a DACport Pro without such problems. I went with a GO 1000 with the understanding it could be used safely with both headphones and earphones. :mad: 

post #132 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxelCloris View Post
 

 

The worry was that people were adjusting volume on the GO, then if the computer changed volume the GO went back to max volume and completely blasted the ears of whoever was listening. This was recreated on the GO 1000 by multiple people. So by reducing the power output there's a lower dB level coming from the headphones if that occurs, saving your hearing.

Also you basically have no play on the volume as well, right?  Wouldn't you be losing quite a few bits digitally attenuating the sound?  That was my understanding through earlier inquiries.  You can't listen to power hungry headphones and sensitive IEMs out of the same amp without proper gain control, which the GEEK Out doesn't have. 

post #133 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by AxelCloris View Post
 

 

The worry was that people were adjusting volume on the GO, then if the computer changed volume the GO went back to max volume and completely blasted the ears of whoever was listening. This was recreated on the GO 1000 by multiple people. So by reducing the power output there's a lower dB level coming from the headphones if that occurs, saving your hearing.


Do you know if that happens both when adjusting the computer's system volume, and/or an application volume such as the volume control in JRMC19?

 

So far I think I've only seen people make mention of this phenomenon as it relates to system volume, as in that of the OS, but not necessarily an application's own volume.

post #134 of 1158
Quote:
Originally Posted by FraGGleR View Post
 

Also you basically have no play on the volume as well, right?  Wouldn't you be losing quite a few bits digitally attenuating the sound?  That was my understanding through earlier inquiries.  You can't listen to power hungry headphones and sensitive IEMs out of the same amp without proper gain control, which the GEEK Out doesn't have. 

 

Yeah, since there's a limited set number of steps on the GO, the 1000 won't give you much range of use with sensitive headphones. I don't have mine yet, but I would think only a couple before it gets too loud. And since the GO resets each time the system volume changes, you'll blast your ears.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeyFresh View Post


Do you know if that happens both when adjusting the computer's system volume, and/or an application volume such as the volume control in JRMC19?

 

So far I think I've only seen people make mention of this phenomenon as it relates to system volume, as in that of the OS, but not necessarily an application's own volume.

 

I have no first hand experience just yet, but I will in the next couple of weeks. But if I remember correctly from the reports other owners have given, that it only resets based on system volume changes. Individual applications are independent and shouldn't have an effect on the GO's settings. Again, that's what I understand but can't confirm just yet.

post #135 of 1158

Yeah it's just that the DAC play at whatever volume is selected whenever you connect your DAC. So, if your computer is set at  max then the DAC would play at max. If wouldn't play quieter because you had turned it down on the DAC previously. I'm receiving my unit today so I can confirm.

 

I will remind everyone that is is trivial to set a max volume in Audirvana, FooBar, or JRMC. You can set it at -3,-6, or -9dB on only lose 1,2, or 3 bird respectively. The DAC is 32 bit, so losing a bit or two. I'll mostly be using it into an integrated amp but might run it at 2v output by lowing the output by 1 bit. I'll need to test this and decide later on.

 

The 1000 model is made for big inefficient head phones like the Audeze, where the 450 makes more sense for more typical headphones. You can make the 1000 run similar to a 450 but turning it down 1 bit, however, and I doubt that makes much difference.

 

It just arrived...time to go! ^^

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