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Help choosing Subwoofer that is Audio rather than 'AV' focused - Page 2

post #16 of 32
Thread Starter 

Yeah she's definitely a beast, you should try lifting it !

 

It was looking like i'd have to pay around £100 for a basic REL so when I saw the Velodyne for £30 I thought i'd give it a shot see if it's a bargain.  It's pretty old but hopefully it sounds ok.

I'm not sure yet if the volume goes up and down with the receiver, it does come with its own remote for volume plus few other bits like Phase and Presets, so i'll check that out

 

I should get some time Friday to set it all up and get the settings right, i'm expecting to have the neighbour round knocking on the door again :)

post #17 of 32
Any working Velodyne is worth £30 smily_headphones1.gif

If you are locating the sub in the soundstage of the left/right speakers, try the phase setting at zero first, and get everything else set. Then once you get used to the sub a little bit, you can try adjusting the phase to see if it improves the sound. Could be a subtle difference, which is why I say leave it at zero to begin with. Plus generally the sub is not out of phase if in between the speakers (or right next to one of them).

Now by chance are you only using the Denon with a computer as the input? If so, looks like from the manual that the sub might have high pass crossover settings on the line output you could try. The reason I ask about a computer is that with your setup, you'd have to be using a separate audio source with it's own volume control to take advantage of that (you wouldn't use the Denon to control the volume).
post #18 of 32
Thread Starter 

Cheers for the advice on sub settings.

My only input to the Denon is a Boxee Box with the audio connected by line out.  From here I watch all my films, all my music is still played by the CD tuner in the Denon.  Once I finally make the move to a new receiver, I will start connecting the Boxee audio by Optical out and using it for flac files

 

There is a high pass crossover switch between 80 and 100Hz, is this what you're saying is only active when the Denon isn't the original source, or is this just when using the speaker outputs ?

post #19 of 32
The high pass filter is only on the left/right line out on the sub. So take advantage of that, you would have to run your source to the sub, and then your line out to the receiver. What that will do is filter the highs to the high pass filter frequency setting (assuming your sub has that). But that makes it hard to use because when you turn the volume up on the receiver, the sub volume isn't going to go up. Now if the Boxee Box has a volume control, what you can do is turn that all the way up with some steady audio playing, turn up the speakers to somewhere before they start to distort, then set the sub volume to match up. From them then on, use the Boxee volume control.

Otherwise, the optimal configuration is often to set the crossover dial on the sub to somewhere near the speakers start to loose/roll off in bass. That kind of matches up the sub to integrate in with the speakers.The crossover dial is just a low pass filter than only affects the sub output. You can do it by ear where it sounds good to you.
post #20 of 32
Also, I should mention that you might not like the higher frequency setting of the high pass filter, and it depends also on where your speakers roll off in bass. Might not even be helpful. What is the rated frequency response of your speakers?

Some of us like to use the crossover because speakers generally don't do a better job than the sub can at producing bass. So if we can use the high pass filter to cut of the bass output of the speakers sooner to turn over more midbass to the sub, that often *but not always* sounds better.
post #21 of 32
Thread Starter 

ok, I didn't bother with the high pass filter in the end.  I'm moving in a couple of months so don't need to worry too much for the time being setting it up.

Sounds fantastic having done so though.

 

The freq response of the speakers is 50 - 22000 and I have the LPF set at 55 and the phase seems best at 0

 

The volume on the sub needs adjusting to match the source via the remote as it can sound a bit boomy on certain media.

Once matched though it sounds good in films and awesome for 2 channel audio.

 

This is exactly what I was hoping to add to music so couldnt be happier.

 

Appreciate your help cel4145, my next job is to find an old/cheap decent surround amp.   My thinking is to get one without HDMI and just use the digital optical inputs, that way it looks like i'll be able to pick up a Denon AVR-2803 or AVR-2805 for just over £50 mark.

This is probably a question for another thread really, but do you know if these are solid amps and anything else in the similar bracket I should consider ?

post #22 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tommy Peanuts View Post
 

 

 

Appreciate your help cel4145, my next job is to find an old/cheap decent surround amp.   My thinking is to get one without HDMI and just use the digital optical inputs, that way it looks like i'll be able to pick up a Denon AVR-2803 or AVR-2805 for just over £50 mark.

This is probably a question for another thread really, but do you know if these are solid amps and anything else in the similar bracket I should consider ?

 

in the cheap range, onkyo and denon are very well thought of for AVRs.  depending on your use, and your sources, it may be convenient to have an HDMI...at least it does open a few doors for options for future use.  also keep in mind that ONLY HDMI can carry uncompressed, or "true HD" 5.1 (optical can carry DDL or DTS but not "HD" 5.1) which may not be a problem for your uses. 

post #23 of 32
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tip ferday, i'm not too worried about HD 5.1, optical should be fine.

I don't think a receiver with HDMI falls into my budget unfortunately either as i'm looking to pick up from people upgrading to HDMI.

post #24 of 32

I still have the AVR-900 from years ago. Denon makes a good product for the money and I don't think you would go wrong with them. I would also suggest Rotel. I picked one up on the cheap a few years ago. No HDMI or anything fancy, but very well built and sounds good. A definite step up from Denon. I have also heard good things about Marantz, my brother has had many of their products and thinks highly of them.

post #25 of 32
Thread Starter 

Just bit the bullet and bought a Denon 3802 for £50 on ebay.

Its (like the sub), pretty old but should put out a decent sound by the looks of things.

 

Just left with speakers to get now, theres a set of Mission M70's I could probably get for around the £70 mark, I shouldn't be stretching the limits of the Denon so they shouldn't be overpowered.

I could then sell the Mission sub that comes with and get some money back.

 

Bit addictive this ...................

post #26 of 32
That is a nice model receiver. Amplifier designed hasn't really changed in the last dozen years, so you likely would get some very good sound.

Clipping an amp can destroy speakers faster than giving them too much power, so you have to be careful no matter what.
post #27 of 32
Thread Starter 

Does anyone know which floorstanders would (subjectively of course) sound better with a sub........  Kef Q35's or Wharfedale 8.3's ?

 

I gave up on the Missions and have been looking at the B&W DM601's, there a bit pricey though for me :(

post #28 of 32
Floorstanders don't necessarily sound better with a sub than bookshelves. The additional driver in tower speakers adds deeper bass extension, and then towers will often have better dynamics within the same speaker make/model lines as their bookshelf counterparts. But a sub with the right pair of monitor/bookshelf speaker is often the better price/performance value over towers + sub because you are paying for features you don't need in the towers.

So given your budget is limited, I'd get the best bookshelves I could smily_headphones1.gif
post #29 of 32
Thread Starter 

Cool, I wasn't really paying a premium for the towers as they look like they'll fetch around £40 on ebay.

However......... i've just got twitchy fingers over some DM601's with pushed in tweeters and bought them for £60.

 

Google is now helping me figure out how i'm gonna repair them :)

post #30 of 32
Replacement tweeters for B&W are expensive here in the US (don't know about the UK). You can't just replace them with any tweeters. They won't ever sound right. Tweeters have to be matched the crossover and the driver.

But just because the tweeters are pushed in a little, doesn't mean that they aren't still functioning well. If they are, I'd use them as is rather than putting the wrong tweeter in.
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