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Hissy/staticky "s" and cymbals? - Page 2

post #16 of 32

Isn't BT considered by most to be a lossy format?  Doesn't its data compression algorithm degrade clarity and resolution?  At least thats been my understanding.  if that is the case, then I think it (the data conversion through BT) could be one of the sources.

 

Depending on the bitrate of your MP3 files that could also be contributing.... or at the very least highly compressed MP3 is not going to help.

 

Not sure which iPhone you are using, but  my iPhone 5c has a surprisingly decent sounding headphone out.  It can't properly layer an image or portray the soundstage with my better cans.  But it does play my K701 and HD650 PLENTY loud enough, and subjectively I think its definitely not boosting treble.  So that seems counter-opposite to what you are experiencing.  Its definitely not what I would consider a bright or harsh sounding circuit, and the K701 is not a very forgiving headphone with bad stuff upstream.  Not sure what this means for its BT out though.

 

Unfortunately with those bluetooth all in one headsets, you've got BT compression, digital-analog conversion and amplification all on the same logic board inside the cans.  So there's simply no way to determine what the exact cause is and get rid of it.

 

If it were me, I'd ditch BT all together and just strut around with the HD600 straight out the jack or amp that to your liking... it'll blow away your BT headset.

 

I am listeining to a lossy Dreamtheater www radio stream through the iPhone 5c => K701 as I type (no amp).  its definitely not treble-harsh in any way.

post #17 of 32
Thread Starter 
Also on a side note they also have 3 eq's built in. Treble boost, bass boost, and treble and bass boost.
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by kramer5150 View Post
 

Isn't BT considered by most to be a lossy format?  Doesn't its data compression algorithm degrade clarity and resolution?  At least thats been my understanding.  if that is the case, then I think it (the data conversion through BT) could be one of the sources.

 

Depending on the bitrate of your MP3 files that could also be contributing.... or at the very least highly compressed MP3 is not going to help.

 

Not sure which iPhone you are using, but  my iPhone 5c has a surprisingly decent sounding headphone out.  It can't properly layer an image or portray the soundstage with my better cans.  But it does play my K701 and HD650 PLENTY loud enough, and subjectively I think its definitely not boosting treble.  So that seems counter-opposite to what you are experiencing.  Its definitely not what I would consider a bright or harsh sounding circuit, and the K701 is not a very forgiving headphone with bad stuff upstream.  Not sure what this means for its BT out though.

 

Unfortunately with those bluetooth all in one headsets, you've got BT compression, digital-analog conversion and amplification all on the same logic board inside the cans.  So there's simply no way to determine what the exact cause is and get rid of it.

 

If it were me, I'd ditch BT all together and just strut around with the HD600 straight out the jack or amp that to your liking... it'll blow away your BT headset.

 

I am listeining to a lossy Dreamtheater www radio stream through the iPhone 5c => K701 as I type (no amp).  its definitely not treble-harsh in any way.

 

It depends on how it's being sent to the device.  If the signal is being compressed, then yes, that could cause issues.  However, most modern BT devices have support for MP3, AAC, etc codecs APT-X allows for lossless quality transfer as well.  If you are transferring with any of the previous, then you won't get a loss of quality during transmission, the loss of quality will come with the internal electronics that the digital audio goes through. 

 

So if he's using 256+ kb/s quality MP3s, I'm not thinking its the quality of the recording.  And the digital transfer won't do anything assuming that his headphones support the MP3 codec, most modern BT headphones support it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckless Raider View Post

Also on a side note they also have 3 eq's built in. Treble boost, bass boost, and treble and bass boost.

 

If you're using treble boost, or treble and bass boost, then that could cause an issue. 

post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckless Raider View Post

Also on a side note they also have 3 eq's built in. Treble boost, bass boost, and treble and bass boost.

Eeeesh... built in EQ curves are almost always poorly executed, IMHO of course.  Try all 3  I guess and stick with whichever is least offensive.

 

Heres another theory (a very plausible one IMHO)... Your ears have been spoiled by the HD600.  Thats a very high standard baseline, and its going to take a very good sounding headphone to match that sound quality level.  The HD580/600/650 have some of the smoothest and least offensive treble I have ever heard... its one of their absolute strengths, IMHO.


Edited by kramer5150 - 3/11/14 at 10:17pm
post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post
 

 

It depends on how it's being sent to the device.  If the signal is being compressed, then yes, that could cause issues.  However, most modern BT devices have support for MP3, AAC, etc codecs APT-X allows for lossless quality transfer as well.  If you are transferring with any of the previous, then you won't get a loss of quality during transmission, the loss of quality will come with the internal electronics that the digital audio goes through. 

 

So if he's using 256+ kb/s quality MP3s, I'm not thinking its the quality of the recording.  And the digital transfer won't do anything assuming that his headphones support the MP3 codec, most modern BT headphones support it.

 

 

If you're using treble boost, or treble and bass boost, then that could cause an issue. 

oh wow...I had no idea BT has evolved this far.  I have steered clear of BT receivers, just for this reason.

 

Thanks!!  I wonder if the OPs headset uses APT-X?

post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by kramer5150 View Post
 

oh wow...I had no idea BT has evolved this far.  I have steered clear of BT receivers, just for this reason.

 

Thanks!!  I wonder if the OPs headset uses APT-X?

 

Yup, that's what determines what BT headphones I'll actually use XD  But all this means jack if the internal electronics are crap :/  I doubt the OP's headset supports APT-X.  Depending on brand and age, it may or may not support the MP3 codec.

post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyman392 View Post

It depends on how it's being sent to the device.  If the signal is being compressed, then yes, that could cause issues.  However, most modern BT devices have support for MP3, AAC, etc codecs APT-X allows for lossless quality transfer as well.  If you are transferring with any of the previous, then you won't get a loss of quality during transmission, the loss of quality will come with the internal electronics that the digital audio goes through. 

So if he's using 256+ kb/s quality MP3s, I'm not thinking its the quality of the recording.  And the digital transfer won't do anything assuming that his headphones support the MP3 codec, most modern BT headphones support it.


If you're using treble boost, or treble and bass boost, then that could cause an issue. 

It is uncompressed and uses BT 4.

I'm pretty sure I'm using 256 for most my music. Having them plugged in made it very slightly better.

I'm not sure about the APT-X. Its Turtle Beach's media headset. Designed for music and movies supposedly. It's very new. Released 4 months ago.

Also, a great example of a Very bad sounding song on it is Rush "Spirit of the Radio"
Edited by Reckless Raider - 3/11/14 at 10:51pm
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckless Raider View Post


It is uncompressed and uses BT 4.

I'm pretty sure I'm using 256 for most my music. Having them plugged in made it very slightly better.

I'm not sure about the APT-X. Its Turtle Beach's media headset. Designed for music and movies supposedly. It's very new. Released 4 months ago.

 

Well, test them in passive, if that issue still persists, then it's sibilance.  If it goes away, it was the amp.  I think it might be sibilance though... 

post #24 of 32
Thread Starter 
Yeah I think it must be sibilance because it's still there.

so another question. Does sibilance denote poor quality or does it just mean that they weren't designed to recess the treble and are very revealing instead of forgiving?
post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckless Raider View Post

Yeah I think it must be sibilance because it's still there.

so another question. Does sibilance denote poor quality or does it just mean that they weren't designed to recess the treble and are very revealing instead of forgiving?

 

Sibilance is normally present in recordings, but it tends to be very little.  Poorly recorded media that has been compressed (in the recording stages, NOT post-recording to lossy formats like MP3) too much will sound sibilant and distorted. 

 

However, in this case, I believe that it's the headphones themselves that are sibilant due to peaky treble response, that would denote an unwanted quality in a pair of headphones. 

post #26 of 32
Thread Starter 
Well I feel stupid.. I just discovered that my music somehow got taken from like 50kbps and got scaled up to 320 Kbps. So a good recording of a very bad recording.

>_<<br />
Now how the heck can I fix this? I can't search though 20 years of scattered CD's scattered through the house and re-rip it all
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckless Raider View Post

Well I feel stupid.. I just discovered that my music somehow got taken from like 50kbps and got scaled up to 320 Kbps. So a good recording of a very bad recording.

>_<<br />
Now how the heck can I fix this? I can't search though 20 years of scattered CD's scattered through the house and re-rip it all

Test with a HQ version of that song, buy it online to see if the quality of the recording is the issue. If it is, time to begin RE-ripping. Lol. If not, the headphones' peaky treble is to blame.
post #28 of 32
Thread Starter 
Yeah they sound great from a good recording
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reckless Raider View Post

Yeah they sound great from a good recording

 

Did you test on the recording that got converted from 50 kbps to 320 kbps (because you most likely shouldn't)?  Also, what service are you using to listen to music with? 

post #30 of 32
Thread Starter 
Yup. The albums I tested it on were the ones that were 320 Kbps versions of a 50 Kbps recording.

I use mostly rhapsody and pandora to stream.
They are not great quality are they?
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