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Corsair SP2500's died; now what? - Page 2

post #16 of 32
I don't know about your speaker stands, but most are designed to take speakers with bigger footprints than the top plates because most people don't want that showing. As long as the stand is designed to hold the weight of a speaker, and the stand is stable itself, you just have to place the speaker center of gravity on the stand correctly.

Superzeros are good speakers, but they do need a sub probably crossed over at 80 to 100hz. However, I would guess that the Corsairs probably had a higher crossover like that, too (if not higher).

The Indeed t-amps will not have a subwoofer line out. Some subs like the PSW10 have speaker level inputs and outputs. One runs the speaker out from the amp to the sub, and then the speaker out on the sub to the speakers. Other subs (perhaps more than you want to spend) will have rca in/rca outs that let you run the output from your computer to the sub, and then connect the amp to the sub. That would mean then controlling the volume with your computer.
post #17 of 32
Thread Starter 

The speaker stands I made myself. They are made out of 1/4" aluminum plate and aluminum square tube and are filled with sand. No issues that wise putting a bigger speaker, I just have limited room with the way the monitors are on my desk. 

 

Audio is coming from my Audinst HUD-MX1. I control the volume from it so no issue there. 

post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bun-Bun View Post

The speaker stands I made myself. They are made out of 1/4" aluminum plate and aluminum square tube and are filled with sand.

Nice work. I wish I could do that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bun-Bun View Post

Audio is coming from my Audinst HUD-MX1. I control the volume from it so no issue there. 

In that case, you can even split the audio signal coming from the HUD-MX1 line outs and run it to both the sub and the amp as long as you get a sub with left/right RCA inputs.
post #19 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post


Nice work. I wish I could do that.

In that case, you can even split the audio signal coming from the HUD-MX1 line outs and run it to both the sub and the amp as long as you get a sub with left/right RCA inputs.

 

Thanks. I like how they turned out.

 

Split how? Wouldn't a passive wye reduce the output to each device?

post #20 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bun-Bun View Post

Split how? Wouldn't a passive wye reduce the output to each device?

Sure. But I was told by someone--and it made sense to me, but I'm not electrical engineer--that the loss in signal is only a few db, not enough to be noticeable if you have a good source. In fact, when I bought my sub, they recommended I try that, but I actually like using the 80hz high pass filter on my RCA outputs on my sub so that I can can crossover my speakers there.
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cel4145 View Post

I don't know about your speaker stands, but most are designed to take speakers with bigger footprints than the top plates because most people don't want that showing. As long as the stand is designed to hold the weight of a speaker, and the stand is stable itself, you just have to place the speaker center of gravity on the stand correctly.

Superzeros are good speakers, but they do need a sub probably crossed over at 80 to 100hz. However, I would guess that the Corsairs probably had a higher crossover like that, too (if not higher).

The Indeed t-amps will not have a subwoofer line out. Some subs like the PSW10 have speaker level inputs and outputs. One runs the speaker out from the amp to the sub, and then the speaker out on the sub to the speakers. Other subs (perhaps more than you want to spend) will have rca in/rca outs that let you run the output from your computer to the sub, and then connect the amp to the sub. That would mean then controlling the volume with your computer.

 

 

They would be maybe suitable for a 100 or 105Hz crossover if you were using the minimum THX requirement of a -3db point as a crossover, but if you use the more conservative half octave rule then you'd be looking at a 140 to 150Hz crossover.

 

I believe most high end PC speakers will just use the min THX spec which usually means a bass hole off-axis, as the THX -3db rule only guarantees no gaps in FR on-axis.

post #22 of 32
Thread Starter 

Yeah the Corsair's were crossovered high. They had a hole around 150hz. Only complaint I have about that set. 

 

I really like the sub though. So I have a new idea. Since the P4's are still a little big for my desk, I think I am going to go with the powered A2's and build a class D amp to power the sub from the Corsair's. That way I get that sub that I like and can improve upon the 150hz hole of the set. 

post #23 of 32
And if you know enough to build a Class D amp, why not first see if you can just use the amp already built inside of it? Save some money smily_headphones1.gif
post #24 of 32
Thread Starter 

The amps in the Corsair set are too integrated with the DSP and ARM chip in the control console. By the time I reverse engineer it enough to modify it I could have built a Class D amp from scratch. 

 

I am going to try and reuse the power supply though. 

post #25 of 32
Hopefully the DSP wasn't applying any significant EQ to the sub.
post #26 of 32
Thread Starter 

I doubt it. crossovers will be in there but I can make my own crossovers. 

post #27 of 32
Thread Starter 

 

 

Found a deal on some Mirage Omni 150's. And then a display model on closeout Denon AVR-1613. The unique design of the Omni 150's allows them to fit on my desk nicely without the need for stands and I realized I have lots of room on the top of my hutch that I don't need to look at small desktop amps. 

 

Now on the hunt for a sub woofer and amp so I can design/build my own bandpass box. 

post #28 of 32
The Mirage Omnis are some neat speakers. Congrats!

And that Denon 1612 (previous year model) tested extremely well for an entry level receiver. No reason to think that Denon 1613 isn't a great performer as well. Have you tried running Audyssey yet to see if it helps?
post #29 of 32
Thread Starter 

No I haven't tried Audyssey yet. Haven't had time after hours to do that. Be interested to try that once I get a sub though. 

 

Yeah I like this Denon. I had an Onkyo HT-RC430 and it sounded like crap in comparison to the Denon. I also have a Pioneer VSX-523 that I don't think sounds as good but I have no way to truly A/B them. 

 

Anyway, I also found locally a deal on Klipsch RB-41 II bookshelf speakers for $250. So I have them to try out as well. This is going to be a hard decision. There are aspects of both that I like. The Omni 150's definitely go lower and make me not want a sub as much. But the high end on the RB-41's is clearer...

 

post #30 of 32
The Klipsch horns can be fatiguing--it's why they sort of have a love 'em or hate 'em reputation. I would think the Omnis would be easier on the ear for nearfield listening--at least for me I know that they would.
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