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Question about burning Apple Lossless in iTunes

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

I wanted to burn a CD with a playlist of ALAC files that was over 900 MB. I know that CD-R's can only hold 700 MB of data so I had previously tried to convert them to FLAC in hopes the converted files would total less than 700 MB but they didn't get more than a few MB smaller in total. Anyway, I already had them in a playlist in iTunes to see the duration so I just tried to burn it and iTunes went through with it somehow. I had the encoder set to ALAC and set it to have no gaps between tracks as per instructions for burning ALAC I saw a thread on this forum. When it was done it displayed the CD as being a little over 700 MB. So what happened? Did iTunes convert them to a lossy format? It would be pretty unfortunate if Tunes does so without at least warning the user.

post #2 of 8

The format a CD uses is neither FLAC nor ALAC but something very similar to WAV, which means that the 900MB of ALAC/FLAC files that you tried to burn to a CD is actually more like 1,800MB when converted to the CD format for burning. So my guess is that iTunes just burned a little less than half of the songs on your playlist to the CD. Please check and play the CD and post your findings.

post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 

Keep in mind I'm talking about CD-R's, which I've always understood as having a 700 MB limit. Are you saying whenever you burn an audio disc it gets converted to the "similar to WAV" format and a larger size? I played all but one of the tracks all the way through yesterday.

post #4 of 8

If you are burning in Audio CD format then the limit is basically 80 mins.

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Magnet View Post
 

Keep in mind I'm talking about CD-R's, which I've always understood as having a 700 MB limit. Are you saying whenever you burn an audio disc it gets converted to the "similar to WAV" format and a larger size? I played all but one of the tracks all the way through yesterday.

CD-R are either 750MB/74mintues or 800MB/80minutes in size/length. I would double check how you arrived at the 900MB of ALAC figure since something is not quite right.

 

The CD that you burned - does it play in a regular CD or DVD player, i.e. not in computer CD/DVD drive?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by namaiki View Post
 

If you are burning in Audio CD format then the limit is basically 80 mins.

Which is 800MB since the average is about 10MB per minute of audio.

post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 

It's over 74 minutes, just a couple minutes shy of the 80 minute limit. The collective size of the files was 900+ MB before and after adding to iTunes. I played it in my car CD player and I'll try it on my stereo player next.



 



"something is not quite right" was exactly what I thought and that's why I posted this. The only thing I can think of is iTunes encoded some or all the tracks lossy-ily when burning.



 



Should I try to rip my burn and check if all the tracks are true lossless? I'm not sure if there's an easy way to do that, I've heard Trader's Little Helper can but I've also heard you need to know how to do spectral analysis.



Edit: Edited for semantics. I know "lossy-ily" isn't a word
Edited by Horse Magnet - 3/5/14 at 10:01pm
post #7 of 8
Whatever format it was in, it will be converted to 16-bit 44.1KHz audio if necessary.
post #8 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Horse Magnet View Post
 

It's over 74 minutes, just a couple minutes shy of the 80 minute limit. The collective size of the files was 900+ MB before and after adding to iTunes. I played it in my car CD player and I'll try it on my stereo player next.

It's a little early in the day but I think that I may have a possible solution to this puzzle. The 900+MB size - is that what is being reported by iTunes when you are preparing to burn the ALAC files to a CD or is the 900+MB the actual size of the ALAC files?

 

What I'm thinking is that it could be that iTunes is letting you know the "burned" size of the files so that you can figure out what songs to include and what songs to exclude. A guess another way to check this is give us the total playing time of the original 900+MB playlist since a playlist with 900+MB of ALAC files should be something like 160 to 180 minutes.

 

Plus there is also the possibility that the original ALAC files are 24bit rather than 16bit, which would account for the large size and iTunes is (correctly) converting the files to 16bit when burning them to CD Audio.

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