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is it Sibilance?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

Yesterday evening I was listening to music using the hd800, and notice that in one recording with female vocals, there were acentuated sounds I never noticed before. They were not "ssssss" or "shh" as the description of sibilance I found here, but there are a lot of acentuated swalow and breathing noises.

so, the question is, if acentuated swalow and breathing can be considered sibilance.

Many thanks,

Daniel
post #2 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by daniel0407 View Post

"ssssss" or "shh" as the description of sibilance I found here

 

This is an internet forum. We can't make sounds here, we can only use words. Those two quoted sounds above are the best sounds to describe sibilance on an internet forum. I would add sibilance sounds kind of ringy, kind of like the ring of a ring modulator. Sibilance is very subtle and only the the most experienced listeners will pick it up, because they are experienced! Keep it real and don't worry about it. It's a common sound artifact.

 

To answer your question, probably not.

post #3 of 10

It sounds to me like you are using headphones with a 1kHz to 3kHz bump in the response.

post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

It sounds to me like you are using headphones with a 1kHz to 3kHz bump in the response.

 

Either that or its just the extra detail the HD800's have picked up.

 

I've experienced it too (HD650), the quiver in the singer's voice, inhalation/exhalation during notes. It's not sibilance in any way.

post #5 of 10

Sibilance sits from 3 to 6kHz. Breaths and mouth sounds sit lower from 1 to 3.

post #6 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

Sibilance sits from 3 to 6kHz. Breaths and mouth sounds sit lower from 1 to 3.

 

How do you know if the sound is just because the headphones can resolve it, or because there's a frequency bump? I haven't heard this effect with any low-tier headphones, some of which also have that 1-3Khz bump.

post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post
 

 

How do you know if the sound is just because the headphones can resolve it, or because there's a frequency bump? 

Those are effectively the same thing. Headphones don't 'resolve' sounds. They vibrate air according to the input signal. The brain resolves this into 'sounds'. If you can't hear it, it's because the distortion introduced by the headphones resulted in your brain being unable to resolve the sound.

 

Assuming no masking, you can hear a sound because the headphones are producing the fundamental frequency at a sufficient SPL.

Masking could make the sound unhearable, or distortion may alter the timbre of a sound making it difficult to identify.


Edited by higbvuyb - 3/4/14 at 5:58am
post #8 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by higbvuyb View Post
 

Those are effectively the same thing. Headphones don't 'resolve' sounds. They vibrate air according to the input signal. The brain resolves this into 'sounds'. If you can't hear it, it's because the distortion introduced by the headphones resulted in your brain being unable to resolve the sound.

 

Assuming no masking, you can hear a sound because the headphones are producing the fundamental frequency at a sufficient SPL.

Masking could make the sound unhearable, or distortion may alter the timbre of a sound making it difficult to identify.

 

Thats exactly what I meant by 'resolving'.

post #9 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by daniel0407 View Post

accentuated swallow and breathing

 

As long as they aren't even near as loud as the actual vocals I'd consider that a good thing, you're just getting more detail picked up by the mic. I read before where some systems would suddenly have a rumble in the middle of the song on audiophile CDs from one company, and later the magazine realized it was very likely the London underground passing near the studio. Impressive as that may be, in practice that will drive people nuts. I also heard one system before where the lip smacking came through clearly, but louder than the vocals  and everyone around me was just astounded by all the "detail." People, she's supposed to be singing, not complimenting the noodle and broth chef.


Edited by ProtegeManiac - 3/4/14 at 8:52am
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

Dear all,

 

Many thanks for your answers.

 

Daniel

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