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ROLLOFF

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Can anyone explain exactly what rolloff is ?  I have some SE864s and Shure talk about the rolloff. What is being rolled off, and why is it important in IEMs

 

Thanks

post #2 of 6

Hi,

 

You may find this interesting:

http://www.head-fi.org/t/401683/what-do-people-mean-by-rolled-off-highs

 

Best Luck!

post #3 of 6

Here's a place to start: http://www.head-fi.org/a/describing-sound-a-glossary.

 

This is what it looks like:

 

 

That is a rolled off treble.

 

You tell me what it sounds like.

post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanx for that but still not sure i understood it. 

 

I listen a lot to classical music and one thing i have noticed with these SE846s is that at the end of a note you can still hear the noise it made , almost like an echo that fades after the note itself has been played.    Is that anything to do with it ?

Cheers 

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

But thats just it, i don't know what it is supposed to sound like. Sometimes when a high note has been played i can hear a following on of the note, almost like an echo, that fades out after the note has been played.

 

Is that what it is ?

post #6 of 6

Frequency response measurements show how uniformly a headphone (or a speaker) reproduces sounds from the lowest tones to the highest.

 

Bass roll off means that the lower tones are clearly below flat.

Audeze LCD3 vs Shure SRH440 frequency response.

 

SRH-440 have rolled off bass, while LCD3s have pretty flat bass.

This means that the lower tones (20Hz to 60Hz) sound exactly as they were intended with the Audeze's while sound at lower volume with those Shures.

 

Same applies for High frequency roll off. A particular headphone with rolled off highs won't reproduce the highest tones as they were intended, they will reproduce them at lower volumes.

 

The perfect frequency response is yet to be done, and also a pretty personal thing, that's why some makers decided to sell products with adjustable frequency response (like your SE846). So you can decide what kind of sound signature your headphones provide.

 

The echo effect is probably on the recording, extended high frequency and fast decays allow echo to be perceived more clearly.

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