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Why do you think De-essing isn't used much in recording?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I have a set of DT770 and the sibilance can get quite annoying on certain tracks.  Guess the treble peak doesn't help either.  This lead me to spend 500 dollars on the Sennheiser HD-650s.

 

Just about every audiophile headphone besides the real bass monsters and the HD-650 and LCD-2 are the only ones without this sibilance.  Or was there a cheaper option I overlooked?  Even modifying my DT770 drivers with felt only helped a little bit.

post #2 of 7

Any tracks in particular that stand out to you? I'd like to hear for myself what bad sibilance really sounds like. I've never come across anything that bad or intolerable. I mean I've heard cases where it's clear there's a sibilance issue, but nothing that stood out.

post #3 of 7

Unless you listen to modern pop music, the problem is likely in the cans, not the recordings. A flat response should sound clean. If your cans are goosing some particular frequency, all bets are off.

post #4 of 7
In my experience it's in the recordings. I've found two tracks where it is really noticeable with my cans (HD600 and ATH-M50) that I use to test for sibilance. Both of these cans are relatively neutral and definitely not boosted in the treble. The tracks are "Killer Queen" from the Queen Sheer Heart Attack early EMI made in Holland CD and "Lover's Will" from the John Hiatt Riding with the King MFSL CD.

These tracks always bothered me. I've since gotten the Hifiman HE-500 and it's still there but it is not near as bothersome.
post #5 of 7

Listen to well recorded classical solo violin music. That will tell you quickly where the problem is. If you get shrillness and little harmonics, it's the cans. Rock music is notorious for being recorded over the line into distortion. There it's just sloppy recording and or mastering

post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
 

Listen to well recorded classical solo violin music. That will tell you quickly where the problem is. If you get shrillness and little harmonics, it's the cans. Rock music is notorious for being recorded over the line into distortion. There it's just sloppy recording and or mastering

Would Chee-Yun Kim's Propose album be good for this?

post #7 of 7

Not familiar with that recording. Try any violin concerto (Mendelssohn, Sibelius, etc.) in a good recording and see.

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